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Comment: Re:Inflation, slow Internet, skill, slow PC (Score 1) 117

by tepples (#49566547) Attached to: Valve Pulls the Plug On Paid Mods For Skyrim

A much better analogy would be watching other people play board games.

In certain circles, chess and poker have become spectator sports.

Also, we're talking "let's plays" here. There's no "skilled play" involved. It's an idiot with a camera playing a game poorly while making dumb jokes. It's dumb, it's pointless, and it's copyright infringement. Just ask Nintendo.

This is why e-sports won't take off, as the publisher has power to shut down any league competing with the publisher's approved league.

Comment: Inflation, slow Internet, skill, slow PC (Score 5, Insightful) 117

by tepples (#49566435) Attached to: Valve Pulls the Plug On Paid Mods For Skyrim

Now we're getting "day one DLC." What the fuck?

In the Super NES era, games used to cost $60, which is about $90-something in today's money after inflation. Now in the Xbox 360 and Xbox One era, games still cost $60. Day one expansions make the extra $30 of content optional to buy.

Why the hell would anyone per-order a digital game, where there's no chance it'll sell out and they won't be able to get a copy?

Because they can't afford an Internet connection that'll transfer 30 GB in one hour. So instead, they let Steam download the game over the preorder period and then install it on release day.

Why are people sitting around watching OTHER PEOPLE play games that they themselves could be playing?

Lack of skill, lack of strong enough PC, lack of the correct console, game being out of print, etc. Why do people watch football instead of playing football?

Comment: Depends on how you define JavaScript (Score 1) 180

by tepples (#49566159) Attached to: JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

You can't use jQuery without knowing ECMAScript, but you can use it without knowing W3C-standard DOM API. This technically means you can use it without knowing JavaScript, so long as you define JavaScript as the sum of ECMAScript and DOM API. I'm assuming that the so-called guru implicitly defines it as such.

Comment: Re:Yes, if you like stupid eye-candy crap. (Score 1) 180

by tepples (#49566051) Attached to: JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

[Raw JavaScript] is good, it is fast, and there are VERY TINY inconsistencies between browsers, even old IEs, unless it is DOM-crap or stuff relating to inputs and CSS rules. Everything else is FINE.

Except that's exactly why people use jQuery: to ensure that "DOM-crap or stuff relating to inputs" works for all viewers.

Comment: Not available for your platform (Score 1) 180

by tepples (#49566035) Attached to: JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

Learning Javascript is a ghetto because so many entry-level people, who are ignorant and arrogant as shit, write bad tutorials, give anti-pro tips, and generally don't have any fucking clue what they're doing.

In common use, "JavaScript" refers to both the DOM API or the ECMAScript language that calls it. To which are you referring? If the latter, inside ECMAScript is a beautiful language struggling to get out. JavaScript: The Good Parts exposes this language.

FWIW (for those less experienced devs/engineers), most JS frameworks are bullshit, replicating functionality found in the browser.

Only if you are willing to fire customers who use outdated browsers on unsupported operating system. Some of this functionality isn't in IE before 9.

I'm not advocating reinventing the wheel, I am advocating not using a wheel when you walk next door.

Some people routinely use a wheel to walk next door. Likewise, on the web, it's wise to make your web application accessible to people with disabilities.

CSS, Javascript, and HTML are a clusterfuck compared to native-development and provide a worse experience.

How is "This application is not available for your platform" a better experience?

Comment: Sometimes you have to fire some customers (Score 2) 180

by tepples (#49565907) Attached to: JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

but when your "users" are more properly called "customers" -- or even more important, "potential customers" -- then some web dev's desire to preach the gospel must take a back seat to doing the job the way it needs to be done, rightly or wrongly.

There are customers you want, and customers you ought to fire. Users of Internet Explorer before version 9 are probably using Windows XP, an operating system that cannot run IE 9. This means they're less likely to spend money on replacing a decade-old unsupported system with known security vulnerabilities. This in turn means they're less likely to have disposable income to buy your product. It also means they're less likely to care about the security of the payment information with which they buy your product, which can lead to an increased rate of chargebacks.

Comment: Expand details of part of the document (Score 2) 180

by tepples (#49565879) Attached to: JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

Instead of throwing many small fragments at the browser and stealing user cycles to cobble it all together, just serve up the content already.

I have served the document. Now the user has activated a control to expand details of a particular part of the document. How should this click be processed?

Or I have served the document. Now the user has opted into real-time updates of part of the document. How should these updates be served?

Comment: Device's camera (Score 1) 149

by tepples (#49562321) Attached to: Has the Native Vs. HTML5 Mobile Debate Changed?

If you're Home Depot, no ... while it's important, those few milliseconds of lag and somewhat less native UI isn't a primary business concern.

Low latency integration with the device's camera is a primary business concern when you're trying to let the user visualize how a particular home improvement product will look next to other things in the room.

Comment: Why are Disqus scumbags? (Score 1) 275

by tepples (#49561681) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Features Would You Like In a Search Engine?

So any site that uses discus would vanish from my search results.

Did you mean Disqus? So I guess unlike a lot of other users who have complained in comments to this story about Google's, you want a web search engine to correct your spelling.

Those scumbags need to burn in hell

Could you explain why Disqus are more "scumbags" than other comment section hosts? Or could you explain why all comment section hosts are "scumbags"?

"Dump the condiments. If we are to be eaten, we don't need to taste good." -- "Visionaries" cartoon

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