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Comment: Sitting team handball perhaps? (Score 1) 180

by tepples (#48669569) Attached to: Should Video Games Be In the Olympics?

Basketball, team handball, soccer, rugby and gridiron football are members of a family of sports based on advancing the ball into the goal based on restrictions against arbitrarily carrying it. A Paralympic sport in the same family is wheelchair basketball. I wonder what sort of other sports in the same family could be invented for people with no legs like Jennifer Bricker in the same way that volleyball was adapted into sitting volleyball.

Comment: StepMania, but not yet (Score 1) 180

by tepples (#48669485) Attached to: Should Video Games Be In the Olympics?

How do you define dancing games as well? These are clearly very physically demanding games.

Once Konami's patents on Dance Dance Revolution expire in a few more years, I would be willing to add StepMania alongside floor exercise. StepMania is physical but doesn't need nearly as many human judges as the existing gymnastic events.

Comment: Games leave the market (Score 1) 180

by tepples (#48669465) Attached to: Should Video Games Be In the Olympics?

Any argument against e-sports works equally well against shooting and archery

You can still buy new equipment for shooting or archery. You can't buy new equipment for pre-infinite-spin Tetris because Tetris Holding won't let anybody sell it.

competitive archery is one of the oldest sports, at least 2800 years old

I'm in favor of including any sport that's at least 95 years old.

Comment: Unavailability of copies of old games (Score 1) 180

by tepples (#48669431) Attached to: Should Video Games Be In the Olympics?

Because virtual shooting changes far more rapidly than physical shooting. Strategies that work in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare may fail in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. Even if you standardize on one particular iteration of a series, there's no guarantee that the game's publisher will still be willing to sell copies of the old iteration. And the demise of GameSpy has shown that multiplayer won't even be available in older games after a service provider hardcoded into the game pulls the plug.

Comment: Re:Motion blur is temporal AA (Score 1) 148

by tepples (#48669385) Attached to: Human Eye's Oscillation Rate Determines Smooth Frame Rate

You need something like 50+ images per frame to create the illusion of smoothness, and at that point you're better off simply presenting 100 frames per second and letting the human eye apply blur.

A standard TV can't present 100 frames per second. The tradeoff becomes whether to improve realism by adding more detailed lighting (which takes longer to compute) or by simplifying geometry and lighting to hit 120 fps, rendering twice, and combining them into a 60 fps picture for the TV.

Comment: Re:Can YOU show me where I claim that? (Score 1) 283

by tepples (#48669359) Attached to: BT, Sky, and Virgin Enforce UK Porn Blocks By Hijacking Browsers

even if at times you've appeared to claim that the hosts file is a panacea.

I never *ONCE* have!

You don't claim that. Others have accused you of claiming that, and that's where they pick up misconceptions. The hosts file is one layer, and in-browser policy add-ons are another layer to pick up anything bad that slips past hosts.

hosts even add anonymity (vs. dns request logs)

This use of hosts essentially treats it as a DNS cache. But you still have to make DNS requests after the cache period expires to see if the record has changed. Otherwise, after the site you're trying to access has moved to a different IP address, you'll likely end up hitting the server of the attacker who has snagged that same address.

Comment: Motion blur is temporal AA (Score 3, Interesting) 148

by tepples (#48667331) Attached to: Human Eye's Oscillation Rate Determines Smooth Frame Rate

There are several ways to apply temporal antialiasing or "motion blur", each of which is analogous to a well-known spatial antialiasing method. One is to render the scene twice at a slight time offset and average the two; this is the temporal counterpart to FSAA. Or find the motion vector around the frontmost mesh in each 8x8 pixel section of the screen and add a local blur filter; this is more like MSAA. But in the march from 240p (PlayStation and Nintendo 64) to 1080p (current consoles) and higher (PC master race), the preference has been for more detail in each frame rather than a better illusion of motion within a frame.

Comment: Re:Aha/Wait a second (thanks for fast reply) (Score 1) 283

by tepples (#48667249) Attached to: BT, Sky, and Virgin Enforce UK Porn Blocks By Hijacking Browsers

So, this ISN'T some website, but rather a way of getting online period?

Correct. It's an ISP that offers an option for censorware as a service to its customers. When you first sign up, or when the ISP first rolls out censorware in your area, it captive-portals all packets until the householder completes the setup of the connection. In this case, completing the setup includes deciding to turn censorware on or off. Some parents will want it; other subscribers won't. Public Wi-Fi hotspots do something similar to ensure that each user has seen the acceptable use policy.

Again - see subject, & thanks for your fast replies

I'm a bit more "stateless" (in the computing sense) than some other Slashdot users. This means I'm not disposed toward ad hominem attacks; I instead take each post on Slashdot as I see it. And you've shown yourself to be reasonable, even if you're a little verbose, and even if at times you've appeared to claim that the hosts file is a panacea.

Comment: Underemployment (Score 1) 224

by tepples (#48666415) Attached to: The Slow Death of Voice Mail

Being cheap is no excuse for annoying people.

So where should someone who's underemployed come up with the money to pay for all these recurring expenses to keep up with the Joneses? One has to buy a cell phone and cell phone service because voice mail users are annoying, one has to buy a car, insurance, maintenance, and fuel because cyclists are annoying, etc.

Comment: You haven't finished asking for service (Score 1) 283

by tepples (#48666387) Attached to: BT, Sky, and Virgin Enforce UK Porn Blocks By Hijacking Browsers

It seems to me that the solution is not to interfere with the service they're providing to me, which is the service I ASKED FOR, in the first place.

The only reason they throw up this page is because in their mind, you haven't finished ASKING FOR service. Until they know what specific kind of service you prefer, namely a filtered service or an unfiltered service, they don't provide any service.

Comment: Re:I.E. - it checks the IP address requested (Score 1) 283

by tepples (#48666381) Attached to: BT, Sky, and Virgin Enforce UK Porn Blocks By Hijacking Browsers

in any event, use a site like that & you get what you get (I get it).

In a lot of areas, it's either the monopoly cable ISP or expensive satellite Internet with a far smaller monthly data quota.

This is LARGELY a combination of clientside script-driven work (like in "registered 'luser'" accounts here) [...] Let me know please when you can - this isn't one I am familar with as to what's going on in it, both client AND server-side, mechanics-wise

The server knows which subscribers have expressed a filtering preference. It also knows which modems' MAC numbers are associated with each subscriber's account. So packets coming from a modem on a "don't know whether to filter" account don't go to the Internet at all. There's no "client-side scripting" about it; the closest thing is how the server intercepts requests on port 80 to all addresses, so that when you open your browser to the start page for the first time on this connection, you get an HTTP response whose Location: header points to the filtering preference page.

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