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Comment: Copyright strike (Score 1) 61 61

But again, the scene speaks for itself in that it has:

...copyright strikes from a game's publisher against a league for broadcasting the league's matches.

That's the one big difference between physical sports and electronic sports: electronic sports are almost always non-free. See "Why Nintendo can legally shut down any Smash Bros. tournament it wants" by Kyle Orland.

Comment: Re:Nobody owns baseball (Score 1) 61 61

Activision Blizzard owns the exclusive rights to its games [...] Publishers [can] deny a license entirely and shut down a tournament's stream. [...] By contrast [...] Baseball leagues independent of MLB have existed and continue to exist.

that is different from professional sports in what way?

I just explained that. In professional sports, no entity has a government-granted exclusive right that lets it act as a gatekeeper for that sport. MLB has no power to prohibit another league unaffiliated with MLB from forming, playing baseball, and selling tickets to watch the match or stream matches on Twitch. Nor did the USFL and XFL need the NFL's permission to commence operations. Broadcast a video game, on the other hand, and expect a copyright strike.

Comment: Nobody owns baseball (Score 1) 61 61

When the kids were playing baseball and then grew up to play in the MLB... would it make sense to point at the crowd and talk about kids?

There's a difference. Activision Blizzard owns the exclusive rights to its games and has shown itself eager to enforce them (as in the bnetd case). Publishers of fighting games have been known to demand public performance royalties from tournament organizers or even to deny a license entirely and shut down a tournament's stream. I can fetch citations from Ars Technica and elsewhere if you want. By contrast, nobody owns the exclusive rights to baseball. Leagues like MLB can't ban people from baseball; they can only ban people from playing on MLB teams or MLB-affiliated minor league teams. Baseball leagues independent of MLB have existed and continue to exist.

Comment: Implant with a 666-bit keypair (Score 1) 70 70

You could implant a cryptographic radio transponder with a 666-bit keypair in people's forehead or right hand. The plus side is that it'd combine the positive aspects of a "something you have" transponder with biometrics' resistance to loss or theft. The minus side is protests from Christians who think it's the mark of the Beast mentioned in the revelation to John of Patmos.

* Actual theft, not copying.

Comment: Type 4 UUIDs (Score 1) 238 238

The combination of time (the UUID can be time boxed), activity (a successful login nullifies the UUID), and possession (control of the account's registered email address)

My concern is how to keep someone between your server and the subscriber's MUA from compromising "possession", or how to establish "possession" the first time.

Assuming the coders didn't decide to come up with their own GUID generation algorithm that is easily reverse engineered and seeded

I just use a PRNG. If I need it as a GUID, I request 120 random bits and format them as a type 4 UUID. Is that good enough?

Getting the job done is no excuse for not following the rules. Corollary: Following the rules will not get the job done.

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