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Comment: But not a binding precedent (Score 1) 304

And the precedent is that distracted driving laws are not valid and can be ignored.

I don't see how that's true, for three reasons. First, the featured article states that the vehicle was stopped while the phone was in use. Second, a DA's decision not to prosecute isn't exactly a "precedent" in the common law sense. Third, even if the officer had been found not guilty in a court of law, another judge could apply the narrower precedent that police are above the distracted driving law but not necessarily above other laws.

Comment: Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (Score 4, Interesting) 75

by tepples (#47797531) Attached to: Yahoo Stops New Development On YUI

I really wish developers wouldn't use YUI or jQuery for things the web browser is more than capable of doing itself.

The whole reason for things like jQuery is that under old IE, the web browser wasn't capable of doing a lot of these things itself. If you go to the You Might Not Need jQuery site and set the compatibility slider to IE 8, for example, a couple solutions end up as "just use jQuery". Not needing massive workarounds for deficiencies in the latest version of the included web browser on a still-supported PC operating system is a relatively new concept. Five months ago, a Windows operating system that couldn't be upgraded past IE 8 was still in extended support.

Comment: Re:Choose CGNAT-compatible apps instead of UPnP (Score 1) 81

by tepples (#47797485) Attached to: Wi-Fi Router Attack Only Requires a Single PIN Guess
I guess the reasoning is that people behind a static IP probably don't need UPnP. If you pay extra for a static IP, you're probably doing so because you have more computer networking knowledge than the average user of the WWW, and you can just use your Internet gateway's configuration panel to forward incoming port ranges to particular machines.

Comment: Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (Score 3, Interesting) 75

by tepples (#47797107) Attached to: Yahoo Stops New Development On YUI
From the featured article:

Finally, browser vendors are now committed to making continuous improvements to their web browsers while aligning more closely with standards.

I'm curious how long Microsoft will continue improving Internet Explorer for Windows 7. Microsoft has historically ended development of new IE features once a particular version of Windows goes into extended support. This means Windows Vista is stuck on IE 9, and unless IE 12 comes out before January 2015, Windows 7 will be stuck on IE 11. In any case, even IE 9 supports enough of the W3C DOM that you might not need jQuery or any other monolithic framework in your site's JavaScript. People who can't give up IE might end up having to upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1 with Classic Shell.

Comment: Re:Why wouldn't they? (Score 1, Insightful) 60

by tepples (#47797063) Attached to: The Apache Software Foundation Now Accepting BitCoin For Donations

And due to it's nature, it is actually harder for the merchant to be defrauded than with regular credit cards... Not sure where the downside here is, especially if they are not holding them.

I can think of one downside: People might be less willing to pay with Bitcoin if they don't get the protections that they'd get from their bank's credit or debit card. Besides, how would one go about spending without Internet access, such as while inside a brick-and-mortar store with no guest Wi-Fi?

Comment: During the days of Nintendo DS online play (Score 1) 81

by tepples (#47795077) Attached to: Wi-Fi Router Attack Only Requires a Single PIN Guess

WPA/WEP (a.k.a. half-arsed encryption that we never really thought through): turned off on every router I've ever used, since day one of installation.

Was this true even during the days of Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, when the Nintendo DS couldn't use anything but WEP? Or did you just skip the DS?

Remote administration (a.k.a. let random strangers on the Internet sit and brute-force your passwords with no way to tell it's happening): turned off on every router I've ever used, since day one of installation.

So when you're setting up a home network for a relative who lives far away and is not technically inclined, and you have to troubleshoot it, do you make plans to get on an airplane whenever something goes wrong?

Seriously. There's zero impact on always VPN'ing over your wireless connection to a machine that has a fixed line to your actual Internet connection.

Except on machines that do not support OpenVPN, such as a video game console.

Comment: Re:Wireless security (Score 1) 81

by tepples (#47795065) Attached to: Wi-Fi Router Attack Only Requires a Single PIN Guess

If I want [remote administration] functionality, I'll have some sort of port knocking, a DMZ machine, and SSH with 2FA or via RSA keys to an inside machine to access the router.

That's a lot of electric power to waste on leaving two computers on 24/7 just so that you can troubleshoot problems with a router belonging to a not-so-technically-inclined relative who lives far from you.

Comment: Choose CGNAT-compatible apps instead of UPnP (Score 1) 81

by tepples (#47795057) Attached to: Wi-Fi Router Attack Only Requires a Single PIN Guess

UPnP - I am not going to manually configure every internet facing service every time I want to use a piece of software.

In the era of IPv4 address exhaustion and IPv6 foot-dragging, more and more users end up behind carrier-grade NAT. To serve these users, more and more applications are being written to bounce traffic off a server so that the client can get away with making only outbound connections.

Comment: The price of Netflix vs. unbundled broadband (Score 3, Insightful) 81

by tepples (#47795045) Attached to: Wi-Fi Router Attack Only Requires a Single PIN Guess

you can afford netflix and you're using my connection across the street? wtf?

Being able to afford Netflix ($120 per year) doesn't always imply being able to afford the inflated prices that cable providers charge for high-speed Internet access without a subscription to multichannel pay TV at the same address (often $700 or more per year).

Comment: Patent on this new feature (Score 1) 88

by tepples (#47791133) Attached to: MIPS Tempts Hackers With Raspbery Pi-like Dev Board

MIPS32r6 [...] added things like [...] the requirement that hardware supports unaligned loads and stores (or, at least, that the OS traps and emulates them)

What kind of patent does Imagination Technologies have on features essential to MIPS32r6? And how is it licensed, compared to (say) ARM? If you'll recall, unaligned loads and stores were one of the few things about the original MIPS ISA that were patented.

What this country needs is a dime that will buy a good five-cent bagel.

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