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Comment: Mobile game control on flat glass (Score 1) 196

by tepples (#48923345) Attached to: YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default

without bloating them by a factor of 10 by rendering them to WebM?

Many of the non-interactive videos can be found on Youtube now

That's what I was trying to avoid.

Similarly, most of the game concepts have been replicated in one way or another to various mobile devices.

Many of the mouse-based ones have. But the keyboard-based ones, like the falling object parkour game Tetris'd , wouldn't port very well to an input device that's a flat sheet of glass. I haven't seen a smartphone with a built-in gamepad other than perhaps the outdated, overpriced Xperia Play.

Comment: Describe the goal, not the step (Score 1) 196

by tepples (#48923223) Attached to: YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default

Don't just pretend that your question was always "What authoring tools do I have?" when your question WAS "What do I use instead?".

I was trying to avoid causing the XY problem by asking for tools to perform a step toward the wrong goal. Asking "What are usable authoring tools for animated SVG?" isn't helpful when animated SVG itself isn't a viable technology. So instead, I first asked for the right goal (what tech) and followed up by asking for the right step (what authoring tools). My question in full could have been phrased more formally as follows: "What is the most viable technology to replace SWF, and what are usable authoring tools for said technology whatever it might be?" What is the correct etiquette for asking a question contingent on another question?

Comment: Don't use WebGL. Use what instead? (Score 1) 196

by tepples (#48923217) Attached to: YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default

You appear to claim that both WebGL and Flash are "a giant security hole [that] should be avoided like the plague". If this is true, then which technology should be used instead for two- and three-dimensional vector animation?

Yay exposed and buggy interpreters.

I have the feeling you're about to say "native code". The problem is that native code all too often ends up being made for a platform other than the ones you have available to you.

Comment: Provided such an app exists (Score 1) 196

by tepples (#48920617) Attached to: YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default

when the user clicks the url, the browser opens the appropriate application for the urltype.

Which means "the appropriate application for the urltype" needs to exist for the user's platform. Not everyone wants to have to make 14 different apps for 14 different platforms, not to mention that several platforms require a long and involved developer pre-approval process. For example, the Flash Lite player in Internet Channel was the only publicly available game development environment for Wii before that console was cracked.

Comment: Authoring SVG and canvas animations (Score 1) 196

by tepples (#48920193) Attached to: YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default

Animated SVG for the simpler stuff, HTML5 canvas with JavaScript for more complicated animations.

So what tools would you recommend for building these without, say, having to type all the (x, y) coordinates into a script file? I haven't seen any animation stuff in Inkscape, unless there was some recent huge update of which I'm not aware.

Comment: Flash runs on PCs that can't run WebGL (Score 2) 196

by tepples (#48920171) Attached to: YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default

I go to get.webgl.org using Firefox 35.0.1 on a laptop with an Intel IGP and all I get is "Hmm. While your browser seems to support WebGL, it is disabled or unavailable. If possible, please ensure that you are running the latest drivers for your video card." Badgers, on the other hand, still plays perfectly.

Comment: Which better platform for vector animation? (Score 1) 196

by tepples (#48920155) Attached to: YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default

Still, there's no reason you can't do stuff like that on better, more secure platforms.

In theory, I agree. But in practice, which "better, more secure platforms" for authoring and presenting vector animation on the web would you recommend? And how should we convince contributors to the aforementioned sites to remake their works using the new tech?

"If you want to eat hippopatomus, you've got to pay the freight." -- attributed to an IBM guy, about why IBM software uses so much memory

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