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Comment: MariaDB because Oracle does an excrement job (Score 1) 41

by tepples (#49759659) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can SaaS Be Both Open Source and Economically Viable?

Even if someone got a copy of their code and decided to try their own business, are you going to trust them over the original creators when it comes to your job security?

MariaDB is a fork of Oracle's MySQL. I guess people are trusting MariaDB in part because Oracle has done an excrement job of security, especially with its Java virtual machine. (Excrement is the opposite of excellent.)

Comment: GNU Affero General Public License (AGPL) (Score 4, Insightful) 41

by tepples (#49759539) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can SaaS Be Both Open Source and Economically Viable?

The GNU Affero General Public License version 3 was designed to preserve user freedom and flexibility even when software runs on a leased server. It ensures that users can obtain and improve the software that they are using even when they are currently running it on someone else's computer. That way, if a particular service goes out of business, its customers can spin up an instance on their own servers with little interruption.

Comment: Explaining my thought processes: which tools? (Score 1) 406

by tepples (#49759521) Attached to: The Reason For Java's Staying Power: It's Easy To Read

Rapidly switching back and forth between en-US and the keyboard layout for your native language can be uncomfortable as well.

Your poor reading comprehension is perhaps the root of your confusion. I didn't say anything about a tool for all jobs.

I apologize for imperfectly understanding your comment. I'll instead try to explain my miscomprehension one step at a time so you can help me understand where I went wrong. As far as I understand your comments so far, you're suggesting using one tool for entering code and another for entering native language text. Writing a program includes both code in a programming language and comments in the language of the programmer team. And as I understand dunkelfalke's comment, the programming language is optimized for the en-US keyboard language, but the language of the programmer team is not en-US. If one's responsibilities include rapidly switching between writing code in a programming language and documenting it in a human language, what are you trying to say is the appropriate tool for each job?

Comment: Re:For me, yes, but with a caveat (Score 1) 166

by tepples (#49758943) Attached to: Video Games: Gateway To a Programming Career?

And when I asked for new games, they would say "games are so expensive. Why don't you program your own?"

"Because compilers and graphics editors are expensive too." I imagine that this was the era before GCC and GIMP and other free software took off in popularity. And nowadays, it's more "Because game consoles don't let amateurs load their own programs and run them" and "Because you need a Mac to make iPad games, and a Mac is more expensive than a hundred iPad games."

Comment: Specifically indie PC games (Score 1) 166

by tepples (#49758717) Attached to: Video Games: Gateway To a Programming Career?

That said, what Zuckerberg is saying may be right if kids are encouraged to play *indie* games?

And not just that but specifically indie PC games. Major video game consoles tend not to come with interfaces through which an end user can load homemade programs. (The reasons for this date back to a 1983-1984 recession in the North American video game market.) Debug consoles do, but console makers sell those only to financially stable companies that either A. have already published a few PC or Android games or B. are staffed by veterans of the traditional video game industry.

Comment: Re:Games (Doom) helped me into an IT career (Score 1) 166

by tepples (#49758645) Attached to: Video Games: Gateway To a Programming Career?

It isn't even possible to mod most games out there these days.

There are a couple reasons for that. One is that consoles' ease of use outweighs desire to play mods for a lot of users. Another is that publishers may have realized that people squeezing the last bit of replay value out of a years-old game by playing mods is competing with sales of the same publisher's newer games.

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