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Comment: Re:Steve Jobs Was Ruthless, so cry ... (Score 1) 288

by tendrousbeastie (#47082991) Attached to: HP Makes More Money, Cuts 16,000 Jobs

"but go back to our grandfather's days and you would find social responsibility (which was hard fought for, during the union days). companies DID care and they DID shoulder the burden during hard times, because they saw value in the INVESTMENT in their work force! it was common for people to work at the same company for 20, 30 even 40 years!

find anyone like that today. I dare you. if you find someone working 20 yrs at the same place, its extremely rare."

It works both ways though. Most companies know that a great majority of their workforce will leave for a better job if they have the opportunity to do so. It is rare for people to spend 20 years at the place even when they have the chance.

Employers might not have much long term loyalty but neither do employees - I'm not sure in which direction (if any) the causality works.

Comment: Re:Steve Jobs Was Ruthless, so cry ... (Score 1) 288

by tendrousbeastie (#47082969) Attached to: HP Makes More Money, Cuts 16,000 Jobs

"HP puts 185 watt power supplies and changes the freaking components on the fly to save $.005 based on market conditions on the same model. So you can ahve +32 different combinations of the the HP 8500???! Sucks when you create an image as I never know which site at work has which HP 8500. They all ahve different hardware which is most likely defective."

But your company bought them, presumably in part because they where a good value purchase, which shows that there was a demand for such a range of products.

Your company could have chosen not to buy them and to buy something else instead, which if done in large enough numbers would cause HP to change its offering.

Comment: Re:Economic reasons (Score 1) 384

The Huns is a good proximate cause, but of course had the same situation occurred two hundred years earlier the Romans would have easily seen the Vandals off. A deeper explanation is needed as to why the Romans couldn't defend themselves against a simple Germanic barbarian tribe on the run.

Comment: Re:Err, no really (Score 1) 384

The lead thing doesn't make any sense as a reason. They used lead for hundreds and hundreds of years, so why weren't Pompey and Augustus and Cicero, etc. mental from lead poisoning too? How did they manage 3 centuries of inspired imperial growth if they were all suffering from debilitating lead poisoning? Why did it only affect the later imperial period?

Also, how come it didn't affect the eastern empire, latterly the Byzantine empire, which used the same infrastructure as the western empire?

Comment: Re:sugar (Score 1) 703

The Nile delta, back in the Egyptian old and middle kingdoms, was lush and green and almost tropical. This was around 2000 - 3000 BC.

Greenland is called Greenland because when it was found it was, well, green (possibly as early as 900AD ish if you believe that the Vvikings discovered it - I'm not so sure of the details here).

Comment: Re:Cranky for a military takeover, are we? (Score 1) 341

by tendrousbeastie (#45901427) Attached to: The Quiet Fury of Former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates

I'm in the UK and I earn about 50% above the median average income here. I pay around 35 - 40% tax, when you factor in local council taxes as well as income tax and national insurance.

I'm interested in knowing what the typical US middle income tax hit is, when factoring in all levels of taxation (sales tax not being counted). Any one able to give me an idea? I only ever hear about federal taxes when I read newspaper here in England.

Also, the talk from AC above about municipal bonds confuses me - I thought that sates and city level governments weren't allowed to run deficits in the USA, so how can they issue bonds? (Is a bond issue not just a form of deficit spending?).

(I'm not disputing the facts, I just think I don't understand the details and want some help).

The world is not octal despite DEC.

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