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Comment: Re:They asked for it (Score 1) 630

by teh_chrizzle (#27967081) Attached to: Remote Kill Flags Surface In Kindle
It has little to do with working better and more to do with people not having to pay for stuff and little chance of getting caught or punished. Copyright laws may be flawed, but they are not completely unjust. The people who use things without paying their fair share are the unjust ones...not rebels against an unfair law.

yeah right. piracy is always about getting shit for free. we are all a bunch of cheap bastards who steal things, end of discussion.

pirated copies are always a superior product because you can do whatever you want with them. the media market has failed consistently to deliver a product that is on par with that which is available on bit torrent. i never have to worry if a file will play in my media player. i never have to worry that i can't make a CD or DVD. i never have to worry that my backup copies will not work if they don't talk to the mothership on a regular basis. i never have to worry that my new laptop will take me over the arbitrary number of computers that are permitted to play/watch/listen to a given file.

also, pirated copies are more plentiful. i have torrented stuff that isn't available in a store, on itunes, or anywhere else. how in the world are you going to digitize everything that was ever made and make it easily searchable and quickly downloaded? there is no way a company could do that profitably even if the licensing and permissions problem was handled. it has to be done by volunteers who to donate time, bandwidth, and indexing effort because that is the only way that works.

I find it a bit ironic you trust pirates of all people to deliver you a product free of root kits and trojans.

you're goddamn right i trust pirates more than media conglomerates. piracy is a meritocracy. only the good stuff gets seeded and the bad stuff dies on the vine. viruses, rootkits, spam, and other bullshit just fades into oblivion because no one will seed it. there is plenty of transparency in piracy (just read the comments for the torrent before you download it) and there is no transparency at all with media corporations.

also, piracy has more longevity than anything else. how many people bought yahoo music and got screwed with yahoo shut down it's DRM servers? MS did the same thing. what happens when amazon pulls the plug on it's ebooks or apple terminates your itunes authorizations? on the piracy side, shutting down sites and services only makes the system more fault tolerant. the only way to be sure that your media files will always be available is to pirate them.

so you can waste your breath railing away against piracy, but it cannot be stopped. you can declare it wrong, or call it stealing, or say it funds terrorism or whatever but stopping it is impossible. all the DRM in the world can't stop it. all the laws in the world can't put an end to it. unless you are willing to go house to house and shoot people, there is no way to prevent it.

Comment: Re:shocking!! (Score 1) 642

by teh_chrizzle (#20653787) Attached to: Walt Mossberg Reviews Ubuntu

I always disliked the car analogy, because as you stated, cars have a single use.

yes the car does one thing, and it's had years to perfect doing it. any engineer will tell you that if you design a machine to do several things at once, it will be far more prone to malfunction and harder to maintain than a single purpose machine. this is not to say that the PC is a flawed design; it's to say that "mainstream users" don't understand that the PC is a machine with no clearly defined function or purpose and that it should be treated as such.

if i built a factory to make anything on a moment's notice, using the manufacturing equivalent of lego blocks, conventional wisdom would say that i had lost my mind. yet that is what the PC does... either with windows, or mac os, or linux. it does "anything" by using software, the computing equivalent of lego blocks.

though as Ubuntu touts the phrase "it just works" is that not the idea?

nothing "just works". compared to earlier v windows doesn't, macs don't, nothing does. it's up there with "the check is in the mail" and "i won't cum in your mouth" as some of the greatest lies ever told to unwitting suckers. we all know this because we all know computers, but for some reason linux gets held to a higher standard because it requires "ordinary" people to learn something new instead of tolerating something that's been wrong for years. some how, learning how to edit a text file or type a command in a window is heinous compared to removing (or pating someone to remove) spyware and viruses, or buying additional software to make your machine useful.

and when i say "edit a text file" or "type a command in a window" i really mean, "use google to find what you need and copy and paste it in the appropriate place" it's most heinous, egregious even. why would i do something so onerous when i can just reinstall windows every 6 months, or manually navigate the morass that is the windows registry, or just buy another suite of tools to protect me from the security flaws inherent in the first suite of tools i bought?

does more progress need to be made in linux? absolutely. but the unwashed computing masses need to step up and learn a thing or two as well. they need to learn that the "accepted way" of doing things is no longer acceptable, and that there are worse things in the world than the command line, like treacherous computing, loss of privacy, and data corruption from system failures.

Announcements

+ - SDF Public Access UNIX System Celebrates 20 Years->

Submitted by
Stephen Jones
Stephen Jones writes "The SDF Public Access UNIX System Celebrates 20 Years!
http://sdf.lonestar.org/

It was on June 16th, 1987 that the SDF-1 received its first caller at
300bps. This little Apple ][e BBS of the late 80s turned into a Public
Access UNIX System with the demise of "killer.dallas.tx.us" during the
"Operation Sundevil" raids. Since then it has grown to become the oldest
and largest continually operating PUBNIX on the planet."

Link to Original Source
Unix

+ - SDF Public Access Unix System Turns 20->

Submitted by Eileen
Eileen (798477) writes "Remember those days when you could get a free Unix shell account and learn all about the command line? You still can at the Super Dimension Fortress (SDF). SDF is celebrating its 20th birthday on June 16.

Full press release text:
The SDF Public Access UNIX System Celebrates 20 Years!
http://sdf.lonestar.org


It was on June 16th, 1987 that the SDF-1 received its first caller at 300bps. This little Apple ][e BBS of the late 80s turned into a Public Access UNIX System with the demise of "killer.dallas.tx.us" during the "Operation Sundevil" raids. Since then it has grown to become the oldest and largest continually operating PUBNIX on the planet.

Over the years SDF has been a home to 2+ million people from all over the world and has been supported by donations and membership dues. SDFers pride themselves on the fact that theirs is one of the last bastions of "the real INTERNET", out of the reach and scope of the commercialism and advertising of the DOT COM entities. It is a proponent of SMTP greylisting as opposed to content filtering and offers that as an option to its members.

While access to basic services are free to everyone, lifetime membership can be obtained for a mere onetime donation of $36. And it is the members who decide which programs and features are available. The members communicate via a web free, google inaccessible, text bulletin board ('bboard') as well as an interactive chat ('com') where users battle each other in the integrated netris matches. The interface of these programs harks back to the days when TOPS-20 CMD J-SYS ruled the ARPANET.

SDF has also become home to well known hackers such as Bill Gosper, Tom Ellard (Severed Heads), Geoff Goodfellow, Carolyn Meinel and Ezra Buchla, son of the father of the Synthesizer. From this pool of talent you might expect more than just computing, and you'd be correct. An annual music compilation is published featuring original music ranging from electronic noise to improvised piano sonatinas. Gosper's puzzles which he has cut at his favorite laser shop are frequently given away as membership perks or through fundraising raffles.

There are always classes being taught on SDF as well, where instructors and students enjoy free access to the latest teaching and programming tools. Instructors manage their own classes in such a way as not to be encumbered by their own school's outdated utilities or computer security restrictions, which can hamper the learning process.

And where else would you expect to be able to locally dialup at 1200bps from just about anywhere in the USA and Canada with a Commodore 64 and get a login prompt? SDF! As well as direct login, SDF offers PPP and PPPoE via analogue dialup (1200bps — 56kbps), ISDN and DSL. Members also have access to the SDF VPN (Virtual Private Network) and Dynamic Domain Name Service.

One of the many interesting and esoteric aspects of life on the SDF-1 is GOPHER. All users have access to their own GOPHER space and a number of them continue to find it a useful way to share text and data. And if you don't want to relive that past, SDF's 'motd.org' project offers a collaboration amongst members to share source and security tweaks for the latest wikis, web forums, photo galleries and blogs.

SDF runs NetBSD on a cluster of 12 DEC alphas with 3 BGP'ed T1s linking it to the INTERNET. It is an annual supporter of the NetBSD foundation and the Computer History Museum (CA). One of its original incarnations, an AT&T 3B2/500, is displayed annually at the Vintage Computer Festival."

Link to Original Source
Unix

+ - SDF Public Access UNIX turns 20!

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "It was on June 16th, 1987 that the SDF-1 received its first caller at 300bps. This little Apple ][e BBS of the late 80s turned into a Public Access UNIX System with the demise of "killer.dallas.tx.us" during the "Operation Sundevil" raids. Since then it has grown to become the oldest and largest continually operating PUBNIX on the planet.

Over the years SDF has been a home to 2+ million people from all over the world and has been supported by donations and membership dues. SDFers pride themselves on the fact that theirs is one of the last bastions of "the real INTERNET", out of the reach and scope of the commercialism and advertising of the DOT COM entities.

for more....http://sdf.lonestar.org/news/"
Networking

+ - Happy 20th SDF->

Submitted by
m0smithslash
m0smithslash writes "Where were you in 1987? 1987 was the year that Oscar Arias Sanchez won the Nobel peace prize, Supernova 1987A is observed (the first "naked-eye" supernova since 1604), the Unabomber, N.Y. Giants defeat the Denver Broncos, 39- 20, in Super Bowl XXI, and the The Legend of Zelda released for the NES in North America. June 16th, 1987 marked the day that the SDF-1 received its first caller at 300bps. From the press release:

This little Apple ][e BBS of the late 80s turned into a Public Access UNIX System with the demise of "killer.dallas.tx.us" during the "Operation Sundevil" raids. Since then it has grown to become the oldest and largest continually operating PUBNIX on the planet.
For crying out loud, all users have access to their own GOPHER space as well as more modern technologies like blogs, wikis and so forth. What more could you want?"

Link to Original Source
Unix

+ - SDF Public Access Unix System turns 20 ...->

Submitted by
edrdo
edrdo writes "SDF (aka Super Dimensional Fortress), the largest and oldest public access UNIX system (also a non-profit organization) has just turned 20. See the press release to get an idea of how rich the SDF story is and how hard these pioneering guys have stuck to their ideals and payed a great service to the Internet.

The SDF Public Access UNIX System Celebrates 20 Years! http://sdf.lonestar.org/ It was on June 16th, 1987 that the SDF-1 received its first caller at 300bps. This little Apple ][e BBS of the late 80s turned into a Public Access UNIX System with the demise of "killer.dallas.tx.us" during the "Operation Sundevil" raids. Since then it has grown to become the oldest and largest continually operating PUBNIX on the planet ...
"

Link to Original Source
Unix

+ - The SDF Public Access UNIX System Celebrates 20 Ye

Submitted by
claudzilla
claudzilla writes "The SDF Public Access UNIX System Celebrates 20 Years!
http://sdf.lonestar.org/

It was on June 16th, 1987 that the SDF-1 received its first caller at
300bps. This little Apple ][e BBS of the late 80s turned into a Public
Access UNIX System with the demise of "killer.dallas.tx.us" during the
"Operation Sundevil" raids. Since then it has grown to become the oldest
and largest continually operating PUBNIX on the planet.

Over the years SDF has been a home to 2+ million people from all over
the world and has been supported by donations and membership dues. SDFers
pride themselves on the fact that theirs is one of the last bastions of
"the real INTERNET", out of the reach and scope of the commercialism and
advertising of the DOT COM entities. It is a proponent of SMTP greylisting
as opposed to content filtering and offers that as an option to its members.

While access to basic services are free to everyone, lifetime membership
can be obtained for a mere onetime donation of $36. And it is the members
who decide which programs and features are available. The members
communicate via a web free, google inaccessible, text bulletin board
('bboard') as well as an interactive chat ('com') where users battle each
other in the integrated netris matches. The interface of these programs
harks back to the days when TOPS-20 CMD J-SYS ruled the ARPANET.

SDF has also become home to well known hackers such as Bill Gosper,
Tom Ellard (Severed Heads), Geoff Goodfellow, Carolyn Meinel and Ezra
Buchla, son of the father of the Synthesizer. From this pool of talent
you might expect more than just computing, and you'd be correct. An
annual music compilation is published featuring original music ranging
from electronic noise to improvised piano sonatinas. Gosper's puzzles
which he has cut at his favorite laser shop are frequently given away as
membership perks or through fundraising raffles.

There are always classes being taught on SDF as well, where instructors
and students enjoy free access to the latest teaching and programming
tools. Instructors manage their own classes in such a way as not
to be encumbered by their own school's outdated utilities or computer
security restrictions, which can hamper the learning process.

And where else would you expect to be able to locally dialup at 1200bps
from just about anywhere in the USA and Canada with a Commodore 64 and
get a login prompt? SDF! As well as direct login, SDF offers PPP and
PPPoE via analogue dialup (1200bps — 56kbps), ISDN and DSL. Members also
have access to the SDF VPN (Virtual Private Network) and Dynamic Domain
Name Service.

One of the many interesting and esoteric aspects of life on the SDF-1
is GOPHER. All users have access to their own GOPHER space and a
number of them continue to find it a useful way to share text and data.
And if you don't want to relive that past, SDF's 'motd.org' project
offers a collaboration amongst members to share source and security tweaks
for the latest wikis, web forums, photo galleries and blogs.

SDF runs NetBSD on a cluster of 12 DEC alphas with 3 BGP'ed T1s linking
it to the INTERNET. It is an annual supporter of the NetBSD foundation
and the Computer History Museum (CA). One of its original incarnations,
an AT&T 3B2/500, is displayed annually at the Vintage Computer Festival."
Unix

+ - The SDF Public Access UNIX System turns "20->

Submitted by
arpawolf
arpawolf writes ""This is a great story of people helping people an doing it in high fashion in the UNIX world." Below is the story written by its users: The SDF Public Access UNIX System turns "20"! http://sdf.lonestar.org/ It was on June 16th, 1987 that the SDF-1 received its first caller at 300bps. This little Apple ][e BBS of the late 80s turned into a Public Access UNIX System with the demise of "killer.dallas.tx.us" during the "Operation Sundevil" raids. Since then it has grown to become the oldest and largest continually operating PUBNIX on the planet. Over the years SDF has been a home to 2+ million people from all over the world and has been supported by donations and membership dues. SDFers pride themselves on the fact that theirs is one of the last bastions of "the real INTERNET", out of the reach and scope of the commercialism and advertising of the DOT COM entities. It is a proponent of SMTP greylisting as opposed to content filtering and offers that as an option to its members. While access to basic services are free to everyone, lifetime membership can be obtained for a mere onetime donation of $36. And it is the members who decide which programs and features are available. The members communicate via a web free, google inaccessible, text bulletin board ('bboard') as well as an interactive chat ('com') where users battle each other in the integrated netris matches. The interface of these programs harks back to the days when TOPS-20 CMD J-SYS ruled the ARPANET. SDF has also become home to well known hackers such as Bill Gosper, Tom Ellard (Severed Heads), Geoff Goodfellow, Carolyn Meinel and Ezra Buchla, son of the father of the Synthesizer. From this pool of talent you might expect more than just computing, and you'd be correct. An annual music compilation is published featuring original music ranging from electronic noise to improvised piano sonatinas. Gosper's puzzles which he has cut at his favorite laser shop are frequently given away as membership perks or through fundraising raffles. There are always classes being taught on SDF as well, where instructors and students enjoy free access to the latest teaching and programming tools. Instructors manage their own classes in such a way as not to be encumbered by their own school's outdated utilities or computer security restrictions, which can hamper the learning process. And where else would you expect to be able to locally dialup at 1200bps from just about anywhere in the USA and Canada with a Commodore 64 and get a login prompt? SDF! As well as direct login, SDF offers PPP and PPPoE via analogue dialup (1200bps — 56kbps), ISDN and DSL. Members also have access to the SDF VPN (Virtual Private Network) and Dynamic Domain Name Service. One of the many interesting and esoteric aspects of life on the SDF-1 is GOPHER. All users have access to their own GOPHER space and a number of them continue to find it a useful way to share text and data. And if you don't want to relive that past, SDF's 'motd.org' project offers a collaboration amongst members to share source and security tweaks for the latest wikis, web forums, photo galleries and blogs. SDF runs NetBSD on a cluster of 12 DEC alphas with 3 BGP'ed T1s linking it to the INTERNET. It is an annual supporter of the NetBSD foundation and the Computer History Museum (CA). One of its original incarnations, an AT&T 3B2/500, is displayed annually at the Vintage Computer Festival."
Link to Original Source
Sci-Fi

+ - Favorite sci-fi spaceship carrier

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Favorite sci-fi spaceship carrier:
- SSD Executor
- Homeworld Mothership
- SDF-1
- Andromeda Ascendant
- USS Saratoga
- Battlestar Galactica
- Thundersub
- TCS Tiger's Claw"

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