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Web-based IDEs Edge Closer To the Mainstream 244

snitch writes "Last week Mozilla released Bespin, their web-based framework for code editing, and only a few days later Boris Bokowski and Simon Kaegi implemented an Eclipse-based Bespin server using headless Eclipse plug-ins. With the presentation of the web-based Eclipse workbench at EclipseCon and the release of products like Heroku, a web-based IDE and hosting environment for RoR apps, it seems that web-based IDEs might soon become mainstream."

City In Georgia Planning Virtual World For Civic Interaction 39

GamePolitics reports that Decatur, Georgia is looking into the development of a virtual environment to "encourage community networking, improve civic engagement, and promote economic development in the city." They've put out a request for ideas (PDF) on how to adapt a blending of MMOs and social networking to suit a city's civic needs. "The virtual environment should mimic, though not necessarily mirror, the layout and visual aspects of the City within the defined geographic area." They also want it to be avatar-based, friendly to businesses, and have a "fun and intuitive interface."

Musicians Protest Use Of Songs By US Jailers Screenshot-sm 210

The guy who wrote the Barney "I love you" song, and other musicians are banding together to protest the US military using their songs as weapons. The campaign has brought together groups including Massive Attack and musicians such as Tom Morello, who played with Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave. It will feature minutes of silence during concerts and festivals, said Chloe Davies of the British law group Reprieve, which represents dozens of Guantanamo Bay detainees and is organizing the campaign.

Opera Mini Not Rejected From iPhone (Yet) 202

danaris writes in to inform us that John Gruber has done some digging on the reported rejection from the App Store of Opera Mini, and has written up his findings. Some choice excerpts: "My understanding, based on information from informed sources who do not wish to be identified because they were not authorized by their employers, is that Opera has developed an iPhone version of Opera Mini — but they haven't even submitted it to Apple, let alone had it be rejected. ... If what they've done for the iPhone is [to get] a Java ME runtime running on the iPhone — it's clearly outside the bounds of the iPhone SDK Agreement. ... What Opera would need to do to have a version of Opera Mini they could submit to the App Store would be to port the entire client software to the C and Objective-C APIs officially supported on the iPhone. It could well be that even then, Apple would reject it from the App Store on anti-competitive grounds — but contrary to this week's speculation, that has not happened."

Submission + - OSS used to punish competition is bad biz (

Technical Writing Geek writes: "Oliver Alexy of Technische Universität München (TUM) Business School has written an interesting paper entitled "Putting a Value on Openness: The Effect of Product Source Code Releases on the Market Value of Firms." It says if a vendor is more worried about pulverizing its competitors than it is in serving its customers, the investment markets recognize this and punish its stock."


Submission + - Unofficial URI-patch for Windows (

dg2fer writes: For more than two month, the vulnerability of parsing URIs is known for several Windows programms, including Outlook, Adobe Reader, IRC clients and many more.

The latest Microsoft patches published for October did not include a solution for the URI problem, so according to an article on heise security hackers started to solve the problem theirselfes and published an unofficial patch which cleans up the critical parameters of URI system calls before calling the vulnerable Windows system function.

It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - How to survive eighty million years without sex (

bananaendian writes: "BBC is reporting on a discovery of how a creature has survived for 80 million years without sex. Scientists have long pondered how asexual organisms can survive the evolutionary pressures of changing environments but according to Science magazine, a team of UK scientists have shown that a tiny invertebrate known as a bdelloid rotifer has found a way to benefit from such long celibacy. The team has been able to show for the first time that gene copies in asexual animals can have different functions."

Unix is the worst operating system; except for all others. -- Berry Kercheval