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Comment MGNT might know on-prem site is closing, can't say (Score 1) 154

It's senior management's call unless they request otherwise. Maybe the obvious on-prem location is closing abruptly, and senior management isn't allowed to announce that yet. Or maybe the cloud decision has already been made by a competent IT team of an unannounced acquiring company. Unsolicited technical objections might be, at best, a waste of time.

Comment statuses/filter in Twitter Streaming API works (Score 1) 424

My filter.json API requests to still seem to do a plain search (except punctuation). Up until last month, was extremely useful for plain search, but I think they changed it (either to give far fewer results, or to make its own guess of what I actually want).

Comment million fake tweets with blurry question pictures? (Score 1) 95

Although nobody should send fake tweets, I wonder what plans Pearson has for a scenario with a huge amount of chaff to investigate. For example: suppose many accounts sent tweets in a 1 hour period after school on your local area's testing day, all of the tweets had relevant text keywords and a picture reminiscent of a PARCC sample test question, and all of the pictures had various problems (blurriness, poor contrast, aimed at the corner of a page, etc.) that would make analysis expensive.

Comment anti-spam sites force centralization, help SIGINT (Score 2) 235

Originally email was decentralized in a practical way. Now, unless you arrange for your outbound email to arrive from a server operated by a large email provider, your deliverability is probably low. All of the email reputation systems, blocklists, DKIM, SPF, etc. are advertised as anti-spam measures. The reality is that they force email centralization in a way that helps the monitoring of email by the major SIGINT players.

Comment long-term storage of phone location records? (Score 1) 295

The critical question is not why the cell phone records are released, but what records exist and why they exist. News reports often state that, at the very beginning of an investigation, law enforcement had information such as "the last time this person's phone pinged a tower was in Bridgehampton three days ago at noon." Wireless carriers can't predict who might be investigated, so this may imply long-term storage of every person's location. Questions include: A. Can I compel my carrier to tell me what information it currently retains about my own previous locations? B. How about other people's locations, with a civil subpoena? C. Is my carrier using my historical location data for its own internal purposes (marketing, etc.)?

"What people have been reduced to are mere 3-D representations of their own data." -- Arthur Miller