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Comment Re:Totally! Journalists should... (Score 1) 778

Except that's exactly why "ulterior motives" matter, it means the person presenting the argument wants the audience to believe something in particular, so because they have ulterior motives they will generally choose to present their audience with the best arguments for their position, and only the worst arguments against. As long as the presenter has ulterior motive, then the presenter has little incentive to address good arguments against their position.

So ulterior motives are bad, ok?

Comment Re:Dial-up is all there is some places... (Score 2, Informative) 250

>>>They sell those 3G USB dongles and pre-paid access at pretty competitive prices now

My dialup costs $7 per month. Are they competitive with that? I see Verizon charges $50 for every 500 megabytes. That 500 MB is equivalent to only 22 hours of dialup downloading.

Comment Re:AAAS, NAS, and AMS apparently disagree (Score 1) 874

How exactly does any of this call into question the credibilty of NAS? I agree with looking at the evidence, but most people are not qualified to do that, frankly, and need to trust somebody who understands the science to do it for them. Who would you trust to review the evidence and reach a conclusion? Have you reviewed the evidence yourself? I suspect that if you do, you'll find that it is quite sound.

Comment Re:Have a great trip! (Score 1) 1095

Frequenting the pubs is a key survival tip, it's the only place where you have any chance of getting something edible for a reasonable price.

Sorry, I have to disagree here. There are loads of great places to eat in London, here's some examples off the top of my head:

Woodlands, Marylebone High Street (Great, central, cheap South Indian food)
Rasa Sayang, Chinatown (Cheap but good Malaysian)
Tayyabs, East end (Great but cheap Pakistani food, behind the mosque, big queues most of the time)
Royal China, all over town (Pricey but good Chinese, good for dim sum, big queues weekends)
Meson Don Felipe, The Cut (yes, that's the name of a street) (Spanish Tapas, cheap, good wine, good atmosphere)
Hafez, Hereford Road (Great Iranian food)
Tas, all over town (Acceptable Turkish food)
Gordons Wine Bar - wine bar dive in the middle of town for a change from pubs, of which there are few good ones in the center
Princess Garden, Mayfair (Moderately priced dim sum)
Mildred's, Soho (Moderately priced veggie)

Avoid Convent Garden, Leicester Square, Brick Lane, and other touristy spots for eating/drinking (though Chinatown/soho is OK) and you should do fine. Most pubs will serve rubbish food in my experience, though there are some gastro pubs which do quite good food - if it's a trendy pub it might do quality food, otherwise probably not. Don't rely on reviews on google maps, which are often completely off base, ask a local.

As for geeky things, don't forget the observatory in Greenwich, on the top of the hill in a lovely park with great views of London, plus the foot-passage under the river Thames which leads from Greenwich to the Isle of Dogs - worth a day trip on the DLR if you have the time.

Comment Re:Random write speed? (Score 2, Interesting) 160

I think you're missing something about IOPS. With a 256K block size, you'd be lucky to crack 1000 IOPS over a SATA 3Gb/sec link. At such a large block size you hit the interface bandwidth limit way before you hit any IOPS limit.

Multithreaded database applications do not hit a drive with sequential 256K block requests. Under load, there will be several of those requests occurring simultaneously. Given the timing, a non-NCQ drive may receive the parallel requests rapidly alternating among multiple 256K streams in differing locations. The now highly random stream will bring non-NCQ drives to their knees, while an X25 will just keep right on cruising at very close to 100 MB/sec.

Allyn Malventano
Storage Editor, PC Perspective

Comment Re:As someone that suffers from depression too.. (Score 2, Informative) 645

Side note: Not all depression meds are 'hard'.
Check out something like Zoloft, which works to balance the level of seratonin, to work to fix the problem, as opposed to a med that simply 'props' you up.
I had similar issues years ago, found Zoloft was a good fit for a few reasons:
1) As mentioned above, it helps fix the cause, not the symptoms
2) Taking anti-depressives is depressing. Taking one you know won't fuck you up helps lessen the blow.

Chat to a sensible doctor. There may be something that fits you.

Comment If you want a virtual environment (Score 1) 264

If you want a virtual environment, witch in my experience is really easy to administer, you need some sort of SAN or iSCSI environment. Then you have a base for attaching the needed computing power to this storage solution. It will be costly to start up, mostly be course of the rather powerful switches you need to get. Those are easy 10K a piece.
We just set up a brand new virtual environment at my work (university it department serving about 5k people), the trick is really to get the infrastructure in place, network connectivity, and backbone/power redundancy etc. Then we are adding R710 Dell boxes, with 50GB ram(we are upgrading all 5 of them to 128GB next year) and 2x Quad core Xeons, those are cheap, only about 7k a piece. The processing power of those new Nahelem Xeons are awesome! Can definitely recommend.
For a not to expensive SAN i would recommend Dell's Equilogic boxes, they have all the new features, while being robust and built redundant (2 storage controllers, psu's etc), the basic box with 40TB is about 70k.

Since the main concern in my eyes are your aging hardware, you need to migrate one way or the other. Maybe just P2V'ing the old stuff to a vm is not desirable, if you need to update all software. Otherwise it is a easy way to move your old server in a convenient and safe way.

good luck.

Comment Re:Blame Goverment Regulations (Score 1) 1078

Huh? Why should you not be able to do a Service Pack or Maintenance Update for free? Most IT companies do it, and I haven't heard of them having to defer booking revenue under US-GAAP. Are you sure that what you heard about Apple's reason for withholding features is true?

Wireless-N wasn't a service pack or maintenance update; it was a new feature. I looked over the regulations and Apple's interpretation was at least plausible.

Quote from WinXP SP3 release notes: "This update also includes a small number of new functionalities..." and I could also find half a million other examples (almost every application does this). I don't believe that is the real reason. (Of course if the question is whether Apple PR goons are lying or whether they cannot afford competent CPAs, I know what I would assume.)

Comment Re:I don't blame them (Score 3, Insightful) 1078

If walking through a cloud of 2nd hand smoke isn't a hazard, why does it make me cough ? Is it a sign that I'm fit ? On the topic. I won't exactly blame Apple for this, in my personal experience a laptop coming from a smokers home is generally more dirty, particularly in the fan, where huge lumps of congested hair and dust will generally be thicker on a smokers machine nearly eliminating airflow.

Comment Re:60 cups (Score 1) 628

There's a meaningful difference between having your perception of what is there altered, and perceiving things that are not there. The latter is a hallucination (in the technical sense), the former is not. That doesn't mean that the altered perception is real. It doesn't even say much about whether the hallucination or the distortion is a stronger effect. Is hearing your cell phone ring when it didn't a milder effect than having the geometric designs of your wallpaper morph into animals that walk across the wall? Probably. It's also a true hallucination, while the other isn't.

Going the speed of light is bad for your age.