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Submission + - Mozilla Wants To Deprecate Non-Secure HTTP

An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla today announced its intent to phase out non-secure HTTP, and that it will be making some proposals to the W3C WebAppSec Working Group soon. Specifically, the company says it is committed to "new development efforts on the secure web and to start removing capabilities from the non-secure web." Richard Barnes, Firefox's security lead, emphasized the company needs to work with the broader Internet community to achieve this ambitious objective. "Since the goal of this effort is to send a message to the web developer community that they need to be secure, our work here will be most effective if coordinated across the web community," Barnes said, and then outlined Mozilla's plans as two-fold, though details on how exactly Firefox will be impacted are still unclear.

Submission + - Steve Blank: No One Cares About Your Education (

itwbennett writes: "Retired entrepreneur and Stanford professor, Steve Blank, recalls in a blog post how a recruiter once suggested he fudge a degree on his resume to land a plum job. He didn't do it, got the job, and to this day doesn't include an education section on his resume. The fact that he has no college degree is part of the reason, but also if your're using your education to catch the attention of whoever is filtering resumes, you might as well use the space to mention your Mensa membership. Better yet, let your work experience do the talking."

Submission + - WiFi WPA2 vulnerability found (

BobB-nw writes: Perhaps it was only a matter of time. But wireless security researchers say they have uncovered a vulnerability in the WPA2 security protocol, which is the strongest form of Wi-Fi encryption and authentication currently standardized and available.

Malicious insiders can exploit the vulnerability, named "Hole 196" by the researcher who discovered it at wireless security company AirTight Networks. The moniker refers to the page of the IEEE 802.11 Standard (Revision, 2007) on which the vulnerability is buried. Hole 196 lends itself to man-in-the-middle-style exploits, whereby an internal, authorized Wi-Fi user can decrypt, over the air, the private data of others, inject malicious traffic into the network and compromise other authorized devices using open source software, according to AirTight.

"There's nothing in the standard to upgrade to in order to patch or fix the hole," says Kaustubh Phanse, AirTight's wireless architect who describes Hole 196 as a "zero-day vulnerability that creates a window of opportunity" for exploitation.


Submission + - The Amiga Turns 25 ( 2

harrymcc writes: Twenty-five years ago today, Commodore announced the Amiga--the first real multimedia computer, and the greatest cult computer of them all. It was launched with a demo by Andy Warhol and great expectations. But it never became a blockbuster and Commodore died in 1994. Still, the platform was amazing and influential, and it's never officially died. (The Amiga's current owner plans to release a new model later this year.) I was an Amiga fanatic in the 80s and early 90s, and took the anniversary as an opportunity to look back at its life and legacy.

Submission + - Motorola Droid x Gets Rooted (

An anonymous reader writes: The Droid X forums have posted a procedure to root the new Motorola Droid X, putting to rest Andoid fans' fears that they would never gain access to the device's secrets due to a reported eFuse that would brick the phone if certain boot files were tampered with. Rooting the phone is the first step in gaining complete control over the device.

We're here to give you a computer, not a religion. - attributed to Bob Pariseau, at the introduction of the Amiga