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Submission + - Jack Daniels Shows How to Write a Cease and Desist Letter ( 2

NormalVisual writes: When the Jack Daniels distillery recently became aware of a book whose cover they felt substantially infringed their trademark, they didn't go into instant "Terminator mode" — instead, they wrote a very thoughtful, civil letter to the infringing party, and even offered to help defray the costs of coming into compliance. I believe plenty of other companies (and many in the tech world) could use this as an example of how *not* to alienate people and come off looking like a bunch of greedy jerks.

Submission + - Indian BMD shield ready ( 1

darkstar019 writes: The ballistic missile defense shield system (at par with Patriot 3 system) has reached its operational readiness and is ready to be deployed in two cities. One wonders how much time it would take to respond to an actual chinese/pakistani threat given the IRBMs are only minutes away from destroying major cities.
The two level BMD still appears a few years away.

Submission + - Boulder Votes for Amendment to Abolish Corporate P (

wooferhound writes: "Last night Boulder became the second city in the nation to pass a ballot measure calling for an amendment to the US Constitution that would state that corporations are not people and reject the legal status of money as free speech. At midnight, with 93% of the ballots counted, the measure was handily winning with 74% of voters in support.
Boulder’s campaign is the latest grassroots effort by Move to Amend, a national coalition working to abolish corporate personhood."


Submission + - 3D Printed bones cut cost of surgery operations (

Tasha26 writes: A trainee surgeon, Mark Frame, has figured out how to save UK's NHS thousands of pounds by taking advantage of 3D-printer technology. Success in orthopaedic operations relies on surgeons having an accurate 3D model of the area where the operation will take place. Such models take time to produce and cost upto £1200 ($1915). Mark, a self-confessed "technology geek," used open source OsiriX software to convert CT scans into files which are readable by the 3D printers at Shapeways, a company in the Netherlands. Within a week they produced & delivered the first plastic 3D model of a child's forearm at a cost of £77 ($123). Mark has written a free guide so that other surgeons can make their own bones which is being considered for publication by the World Journal of Science and Technology. He's also contactable via twitter: @3Dbones

Submission + - Vim Turns 20 (

quanticle writes: 20 years ago today, Bram Moolenaar released vim to the public. Share your vim stories and your tales of battles with emacs users.

Submission + - Wikileaks causes political storm in India (

tanveer1979 writes: White in the west wikileaks cable releases have been met with skepticism and negativity towards the messenger, the scene in the developing world is quite different. Unlike their western counterparts, the Indian press is taking the govt to a task, and opposition parties are stalling the parliament.

More than the content of the leaks, what is really interesting is the way the reactions to the cables have been in the general public. While most western voters stood by their leaders, and even called Assange a traitor, in India its quite the opposite, with everybody baying for govt's blood. It could be because democracy is more democratic in India, or maybe because the general notion of the public that all politicians are crooks, and if there is a bribery allegation, it must be true!


Submission + - India may switch off 3G on security concerns (

An anonymous reader writes: The home ministry has told the Department of Telecommunications to put 3G expansion plans on hold till tapping equipment is in place. Currently, the govt has capability of tapping into normal 2G cell phone conversations, but there does not exist any equipment with the govt. departments which allow tapping of video or high Bandwidth data calls between 3G handsets.

Submission + - GCC 4.5.0 released. (

jamesswift writes: "The GNU project and the GCC developers are pleased to announce the release of GCC 4.5.0.
This release is a major release, containing new features (as well as many other improvements) relative to GCC 4.4.x."

The changes are too numerous to list but the additional C++0x work is particularly encouraging.


Rocketman Crosses Colorado Gorge Screenshot-sm 71

nandemoari writes "Remember the 1991 film, 'The Rocketeer,' where a young pilot uses a jetpack prototype to become a masked vigilante and win the heart of Jennifer Connelly? That scenario isn't as far-fetched as it once was, given that an American stuntman recently used a jetpack to soar over Colorado's Royal Gorge. The stuntman in question is one Eric Scott, who recently appeared on CBS' Early Show and a variety of local cable channels after making his daring leap. Scott has been testing jetpack devices for 16 years, and was confident that he wouldn't plummet to his untimely death when he straddled the Gorge above the Arkansas River earlier this week. Despite an enormous gulf between the two sides — 1,500 feet across and 1,000 feet down — Scott made the trip safely."

Submission + - ZoneAlarm users warned off latest upgrade (

Barence writes: "ZoneAlarm users have been warned off upgrading to the latest version of the software — by its own publisher. Version 8 was pushed out to customers as an automatic update over a week ago, and since then there have been hundreds of complaints about the software on the ZoneAlarm users' forum. Reported problems include laboriously slow shutdown sequences, tardy resume from standby and botched installations. A statement published on the user forums by a ZoneAlarm representative says: "The automatic update for 8.0 was turned off on Monday. We recommend that users uninstall 8.0 and reinstall 7.""

Submission + - Hackers intercept CERN domain 1

noundi writes: Hackers have mounted an attack on the Large Hadron Collider, raising concerns about the security of the biggest experiment in the world as it passes an important new milestone.

The scientists behind the £4.4bn atom smasher had already received threatening emails and been besieged by telephone calls from worried members of the public concerned by speculation that the machine could trigger a black hole to swallow the earth, or earthquakes and tsunamis, despite endless reassurances to the contrary from the likes of Prof Stephen Hawking.

Now it has emerged that, as the first particles were circulating in the machine near Geneva, a Greek group had hacked into the facility and displayed a page with the headline "GST: Greek Security Team."

The people responsible signed off: "We are 2600 — dont mess with us. (sic)"

Submission + - Patent granted for Sports photography

tanveer1979 writes: "It cannot get any stupid than this. Photocrazy has been granted a patent for shooting events photography.
The gist of the patent is
Do you shoot participants in sporting events?
Do you associate a unique identifier (such as bib number, name or time) with each image?
Do the participants find the images using a unique pre-determined identifier?
By default cameras will assign an unique image name, and the EXIF data will have unique data/time. Your clients will use either image name, or tag name(of participant) to search for photographs.

And do not think its not enforceable. Many Photo companies including Smugmug, Printroom etc., have been sued. Printroom has already caved in, and as per a response on dgrin, even smugmug has partially caved in. The settlement with printroom is posted below

Printroom user now have an option in a gallery to participate in the printroom sports license program.
Printroom paid Peter Wolf a substancial fee to license for the technology/workflow, and as part of the agreement now Printroom sellers, can select this option if they feel they fall into the area covered in Peter Wolf's license.
Printroom has three questions:
* Do you shoot participants in sporting events?
* Do you associate a unique identifier (such as bib number, name or time) with each image?
* Do the participants find the images using a unique pre-determined identifier?
If your answer is yes to all the above printroom suggests you enable the licensing within that gallery.
Any image sold will have an additional fee of $1.50 added to the end user (customer buying the a print or prints from one image). (excluding photographer orders, and ordering all images in a gallery).
Just some information I received tonight from my contact at PR."
The Internet

Submission + - Demonoid shut down by CRIA?

L. VeGas writes: "For twenty-four hours, Demonoid has been offline.

The popular Dutch news site, is reporting that the world's second largest torrent tracker, Demonoid has apprently been shut down by the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA)

This happens just three months after Demonoid moved its servers to Canada under pressure from BREIN, a Dutch anti-piracy organization.

Wonder why> the Demonoid folks thought Canada would be a good safe-haven to begin with."

"Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb. "Necessity is the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth. -- Alfred North Whitehead