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Comment: Security through obscurity is also security (Score 1) 349

by talornin (#42926481) Attached to: SSH Password Gropers Are Now Trying High Ports
It seems like everyone is in agreement that moving sshd to a non-standard port is stupid and a waste of time.

I disagree. It is of course not a matter of just changing the port and then be done with it. In addition to all the other security measures (fail2ban, iptables-woodo, key-based auth, etc) moving your sshd (or any service) to a non standard port is both an advisable and mildly effective security enhancing activity.

It might be that some bots are taking the time to scan the entire port space, but the number probes that bother to try your high hanging ports are negligible compared to the never ending avalanche of zombies that tries to squeeze through port 22 (or any other standard port for any other popular service for that matter.)

There is also the matter of bugs in the software. Though sshd is one of the most vetted, and hardened pieces of code out there it only takes one bug to cause a disaster (which has happened before). Attacks never get worse, they only get better! In the case of a 0-day in sshd that allows for arbitrary code execution I sure as hell don't want to be amongst the masses running on port 22.

In conclusion: If your only security measure is to move your services to non-standard ports, you might as well not bother. But your security level is a shade of gray, and using non-standard ports moves the slider a tad in the right direction.

Comment: Skills to pay the bills (Score 1) 266

I'm a highschool dropout that spent my spare time tinkering with unix and general tech.

I started as a customer service consultant at a telco, and now I work as a network engineer at a marjor telecom equipment vendor. I never lied about anything, just applied for positions that seemed interesting, and did convincing interviews and solid good work.

It did and does require a considerable amount of self study and eksperimentation, but I really do enjoy tech, so it's not a problem for me.

The tech industry is generaly forgiving with regards to lacking formal education. Basically, whatever gets the job done.

Comment: Future of education (Score 1) 230

by talornin (#34457104) Attached to: Using the Web To Turn Kids Into Autodidacts
With no higher education what so ever (stopped at high school) the internet has been my salvation. I now work as as an engineer at one of the worlds biggest telecom network equipment vendors.

I belive that future generations will be more focused on finding, evaluating, and applying information rather than outright remembering it. Computers do remembering alot better than humans do, but we still have the upper hand in dynamic evaluation and application of information and data, so it only makes sense that a shift will occure to focus on educating a mind to be highly capable of absorbing and utilizing available information.

Comment: Bubba! (Score 2, Interesting) 484

by talornin (#30542674) Attached to: Best Filesystem For External Back-Up Drives?
I ended up doing as most in this thread did. Networking.

I bought a BubbaII from http://www.excito.com/ its a small fan less linux box with 2x usb, 2x ethernet, and 2x extSata.

NB: NICs are gigEthernet, but they perform substantially slower than one expects. This according to the manufacturer, is by design to keen the temperature at a resonable level to accommodate the fan less design.

Comment: Indeed (Score 1) 132

by talornin (#22996838) Attached to: A Decade of OSS, 10 Years After the Summit
I work as a sysadmin in a pretty large mobile network operator. This is a business packed with obscure and higly proprietary systems (tho most protocols are free and open), yet I use OSS every single day. All of our machines, from the most mission critical call handling clusetrs to the most insignificant terminal pc, are in some way depending on OSS tools. Even an ancient Sinix/Reliand UNIX cluster from like... 1996 runs openssh and some other gnu apps.

I could not for my life imagine a world without OSS tools readily available for almost any platform I use. So, a big thank you to everyone who is making it possible!

Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of tapes. -- Dr. Warren Jackson, Director, UTCS

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