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Comment: Re:Magnet links? (Score 1) 153

by takeda64 (#41020263) Attached to: Content-Centric Networking & the Next Internet
1) It will work on top of IP, but the way it is designed it can work without it as well. 2) Well, you miss the main reason behind this protocol. The reason for its existence is because of sites like youtube, which provide the same content for many users. Now the way it works, youtube sends the same content over and over for every single person. I could turn around your question and ask you who is paying for the bandwidth? I'm not just saying that this reduces network traffic allowing to handle higher demand, but any ISP which isn't peering (i.e. not Tier 1) is paying for access and in fact they are generally paying per amount of data received. If they have 100 people requesting the same data this reduces their cost to 100:1. So it's not like cost of youtube is brought on someone else's shoulder, but instead the cost of youtube will be simply reduced. Anyway, it is not like the ISPs wouldn't have control of what names are cached. The only one who wouldn't be happy are Tier-1 who get paid by other ISPs for their access.

Comment: Re:Magnet links? (Score 1) 153

by takeda64 (#41020159) Attached to: Content-Centric Networking & the Next Internet
I have some involvement with the mentioned network protocol (there's actually an implementation of it on http://www.ccnx.org/ and wrote few applications in it. Actually when coding something you need to reboot the way you normally think about network protocols. You need to think like the network is a giant filesystem with some limitations to listing contents. Instead of planning how headers would look like you would instead plan how your hierarchy would be designed to provide maximum advantage toward your goal. If you want to send a file over network you can go with just one name (I'm ignoring segments for simplicity), but if you want to provide something more advanced like streaming a video with ability of seeking you probably will use more than just one name. So there's no transport protocol in the same sense as we think in IP. Though I guess a naming convention would be an equivalent of it?

Comment: Re:Price? (Score 1) 122

by takeda64 (#40163685) Attached to: Sergey Brin Demos Google Glasses Prototype
Did anyone wonder where the cpu will be contained? I mean, even the bluetooth headphones are relatively big because of the battery and radio needed. The teaser video implies that it would have GPU, Internet access, storage etc. I'm starting to think, that the only reasonable way this could be feasible to do today would be if it would be simply an accessory to the Android phone (perhaps using bluetooth or the WiFi direct?) What do you guys think?
AT&T

+ - At&t to launch WIFI Commercials->

Submitted by butilikethecookie
butilikethecookie (2566015) writes "If you are a frequent traveler with a laptop, tablet or even a smartphone, you are likely always on the lookout for a way to get some free WiFi access. More often than not, however, you are forced to pay a fee to link up to a solid WiFi connection and sometimes those prices can be expensive.

Now AT&T has confirmed it will begin an experiment that's designed to give users a free WiFi connection on their network, but as usual there's a catch. GigaOM reports that the service will involve the user watching a 30 second video ad for every 40 minutes he or she is connected to the WiFi network.

The experiment is slated to launch in September at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. While the service has been confirmed for laptop users, there's no word if tablet or smartphone owners will be able to access it as well."

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+ - USGS Implies Connection Between Seismic Activity and Fracking->

Submitted by samazon
samazon (2601193) writes "According to a recently proposed abstract by the United States Geological Survey, hydraulic fracturing, or more specifically the disposal of fracking wastewater, may be directly correlated to the increase in seismic activity in the midwest. Results of the paper will be presented on April 18th, but the language of the abstract seems to imply that there is a connection. After years of controversy regarding hydrofracking including ground water contamination and disclosure of chemical solutions, the results of the study, if conclusive, could influence the cost of natural gas due to increased regulations on wastewater disposal."
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Comment: Re:Wayland vs X (Score 1) 315

by takeda64 (#39601279) Attached to: Update On Wayland and X11 Support
I would say that it depends on complexity, there are some programs that are simple and short you can compare them to tools. Majority of programs though are complicated and they grow. You could compare them to a house. When you built it it is fresh, everything works fine, and it has latest goodies. But with time, regulations and requirements change. Maybe you need to tear down a wall, make another room, build another floor. With time no matter how well you took care of it it shows sign of its age. You might not even be able to make some changes because regulations forbid you. For similar reason some changes might require fundamental changes and will be very expensive, so it will be more feasible to just tore it down and build a new house. I'm not sure whether you're involved in software development but if you will look at source code of some programs that were there for some time you can see how complicated they become. X11 is one of the well known for its complexity.
China

+ - Chinese Kid Sells His Kidney for an iPad and iPhone, Now Needs A Transplant->

Submitted by assertation
assertation (1255714) writes ""Though you might say you'd give your left arm for an iPad, you only mean it figuratively. But one Chinese teen actually sold his kidney to make enough money to buy the Apple tablet and an iPhone. Today, Wang suffers from renal deficiency, meaning his kidneys can no longer filter out toxins from his blood. Doctors say he's going to need a transplant of his own""
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Idle

+ - Chinese Kid Sells His Kidney for an iPad and iPhone, Suffers Renal Failure-> 2

Submitted by assertation
assertation (1255714) writes "Though you might say you'd give your left arm for an iPad, you only mean it figuratively. But one Chinese teen actually sold his kidney to make enough money to buy the Apple tablet and an iPhone. Today, Wang suffers from renal deficiency, meaning his kidneys can no longer filter out toxins from his blood. Doctors say he's going to need a transplant of his own"
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+ - Android developer being sued by Cequint-> 2

Submitted by SpiceInvaders
SpiceInvaders (1179555) writes "The developer of the City Caller ID application for Android is being sued by Ceguint. Apparently "they have a patent on displaying a city name with state on a LCD screen with a limited processor." Doesn't this cover practically every cordless phone? Wonder if their case goes away if you run the application on a core-i7 phone equipped with a OLED screen instead?"
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