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Comment IANAL, but... (Score 1) 750

It doesn't take a lawyer to realize that the potential liability incurred by willfully ignoring a recall that is tied to issues that have already caused multiple deaths is significant. Imagine hearing the lawyer representing the people who were rear-ended by your runaway Camry as he introduces "Exhibit-A. A document signed by the respondent, wherein he acknowledges that his vehicle has the potential for loss of throttle and braking control, and that said loss of control could result in the respondent or others being injured or seriously killed..."
Get your car fixed. If the update bricks your ride, it's Toyota's problem. If your ride kills people because you ignored a recall, it's your problem.

Comment I'd love to have a conservative to vote for (Score 2, Insightful) 262

If you're not a liberal when you're 25, you have no heart. If you're not a conservative by the time you're 35, you have no brain.

Give me a real conservative to vote for, someone who stays out of both my pocket book and my bedroom, someone who restores free markets, someone who slashes corporate subsidies, and someone who restores the principle of personal responsibility in areas such as drugs and medical care and I will vote for him.

Sadly, the closest to a conservative in US politics are Democrats; while far from perfect conservatives, they do better in terms of liberties and fiscal responsibility. Republicans, on the other hand, restrict liberties, want a nanny state, are fiscally irresponsible, and waste even more money than the Democrats on their corporate buddies; Republicans, sadly, are even less conservative than Democrats.

Comment most users aren't aware of how much google knows.. (Score 2, Interesting) 330

...It's bad enough that they crawl though emails to find advertising targets, but the OS is one of their biggest plays yet to analyse every piece of seemingly benign and anonymous user data and assemble a specific user profile. Think about that: one company; the single biggest commercial data-miner knowing many of your details and habits and inferring others. Would they try to extract every possible profit out of that? Personally the last data-mining straw from google was them wanting my mobile number to create an email account. For verification? Yeah right... Wouldn't they just love to add that to the profile.

Comment Sounds like JournalSpace (Score 2, Insightful) 279

> "The outage was caused by a system failure that created data loss in the core database and the back up,"
> [Microsoft Corporate Vice President Roz Ho] wrote in an open letter to customers.

It sounds like their "backup" was a replica on another connected server.

No actual offline backups at all.

When JournalSpace was destroyed, one SlashDot thread was "Why Mirroring Is Not a Backup Solution".

My favorite comment was by JoelKatz:

>> The whole point of a backup is that it is *stable*. Neither copy is stable, so there is no
>> "backup on the hardware level". There are two active systems.
>> If you cannot restore an accidentally-deleted file from it, it's not a backup.
>> ... if the active copy of the data is corrupted, there is no backup.

Comment Re:Highly Imaginitive (Score 1) 301

The office application suite was a pretty nifty idea, for example.

WordPerfect did it first. As did Lotus, IIRC.

Um... hrm... Active directory? I think that was original, and it was damned nice.

Active Directory is LDAP, which was not at all new at the time. The only thing Microsoft did new was follow it through to its logical conclusion - if you've got a database available on the network which you control the schema of, why not use it to configure every aspect of every PC on the network, rather than as nothing but a fancy password repository?

Yes, we will be going to OSI, Mars, and Pluto, but not necessarily in that order. -- Jeffrey Honig