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Submission + - Native Netflix support is coming to Linux, for real (themukt.com)

sfcrazy writes: Native support for Netflix is coming to Linux, thanks to their move from Sliverlight to HTML5, Mozilla and Google Chrome. Paul Adolph from Netflix proposed a solution to Ubuntu developers: "Netflix will play with Chrome stable in 14.02 if NSS version 3.16.2 or greater is installed. If this version is generally installed across 14.02, Netflix would be able to make a change so users would no longer have to hack their User-Agent to play."

The ball is now in the court of Canonical developers.

Submission + - Microsoft Suffers Another Cloud Outage With Exchange Online (crn.com)

cgriffin21 writes: A day after Microsoft’s Lync instant messaging service suffered a global outage, its Exchange Online customers are now having problems with the cloud email service. Customers began experiencing problems with Exchange Online a little after 8 a.m. ET Tuesday, according to posts on Microsoft's Office 365 community forum. Some customers reported being unable to send or receive emails from Exchange Online. Many customers reported experiencing long hold times when trying to contact Microsoft customer service representatives.

Submission + - Intel To Offer Custom Xeons With Embedded FPGAs For The Data Center (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: For years, we've heard rumors that Intel was building custom chips for Google or Facebook, but these deals have always been assumed to work with standard hardware. Intel might offer a different product SKU with non-standard core counts, or a specific TDP target, or a particular amount of cache — but at the end of the day, these were standard Xeon processors. Today, it looks like that's changing for the first time — Intel is going to start embedding custom FPGAs into its own CPU silicon. The new FPGA-equipped Xeons will occupy precisely the same socket and platform as the standard, non-FPGA Xeons. Nothing will change on the customer front (BIOS updates may be required), but the chips should be drop-in compatible. The company has not stated who provided its integrated FPGA design, but Altera is a safe bet. The two companies have worked together on multiple designs and Altera (which builds FPGAs) is using Intel for its manufacturing. This move should allow Intel to market highly specialized performance hardware to customers willing to pay for it. By using FPGAs to accelerate certain specific types of workloads, Intel Xeon customers can reap higher performance for critical functions without translating the majority of their code to OpenCL or bothering to update it for GPGPU.

Submission + - Hundreds of Cities Are Wired With Fiber—But Telecom Lobbying Keeps It Unus

Jason Koebler writes: In light of the ongoing net neutrality battle, many people have begun looking to Google and its promise of high-speed fiber as a potential saving grace from companies that want to create an "internet fast lane." Well, the fact is, even without Google, many communities and cities throughout the country are already wired with fiber—they just don't let their residents use it.
Throughout the country, companies like Comcast, Time Warner Cable, CenturyLink, and Verizon have signed agreements with cities that prohibit local governments from becoming internet service providers and prohibit municipalities from selling or leasing their fiber to local startups who would compete with these huge corporations.

Submission + - Windows 8.1 Finally Passes Windows 8 In Market Share

An anonymous reader writes: May was the seventh full month of availability for Microsoft’s latest operating system version: Windows 8.1 continues to grow slowly while Windows 8 remains largely flat, allowing the former to finally pass the latter in market share. At the same time, Windows 7 has managed to climb back over the 50 percent mark, while Windows XP still has more than 25 percent of the pie, despite support for the ancient OS finally ending in April.

Submission + - Apple says many users "bought an Android phone by mistake"

mrspoonsi writes: Apple CEO Tim Cook during his keynote said that around 130 million customers have purchased their first Apple device in the last twelve months states, "Many of these customers were switchers from Android," he said. "They had bought an Android phone by mistake, and then had sought a better experience and a better life." He added that almost half of those who have purchased an iPhone in China since December have switched from Android. However, it is worth noting that iPhones were not actually available in China until December, when pre-orders began, so it is unclear how much of the device's popularity there is simply down to the novelty factor, rather than a burning desire to flee from Android.

Submission + - 1 TB memory chip about to become reality (phys.org)

Taco Cowboy writes: Toshiba, teaming up with its memory partner Sandisk, in a deal worth a reported 500 billion yen ($4.84 billion) to set up a plant to produce flash chip which can be as large as One Terabyte (TB) each

Inside the 1TB flash chip several layers of wafers would be stacked on top of each other using the 3D packing technique

The different layers of wafer would hooked on and linked to each others using the through-silicon via (TSV) technology

The proposed chip would be 16 times as large as the 64gigabyte (GB) flash chip Toshiba produces.

Submission + - Apple and Google/Motorola End Patent War (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Reuters reports that Apple and Google's Motorola Mobility are settling all patent lawsuits over smartphone tech. The settlement 'does not include a cross license to their respective patents,' and the companies will work together for patent reform. According to Reuters, 'The two companies informed a federal appeals court in Washington that the cases should be dismissed, according to filings on Friday. However, the deal does not appear to apply to Apple's litigation against Samsung Electronics Co Ltd, as no dismissal notices were filed in those cases. The most high-profile case between Apple and Motorola began in 2010. Motorola accused Apple of infringing several patents, including one essential to how cell phones operate on a 3G network, while Apple said Motorola violated its patents to certain smartphone features.'

Submission + - Proton-M rocket carrying Russia's most advanced satellite crashes (rt.com)

schwit1 writes: When it rains it pours: A Russian Proton rocket crashed today nine minutes after launch.

Considering the tensions between the U.S. and Russia over space, combined with the increasing competition for the launch market created by SpaceX’s lower prices, another Proton failure now is something the Russians could do without. Moreover, the Russians were planning a lot of Proton launches in the next few months to catch up from last year’s launch failure. Many of these scheduled launches were commercial and were going to earn them hard cash. This failure definitely hurts, and will certainly be used as justification by their government in increase its control over that country’s aging aerospace industry.

Submission + - Jury Finds Apple and Samsung Infringed Each Other's Patents 1

An anonymous reader writes: A U.S. jury concluded Friday that Samsung had infringed on two of Apple's patents and that Apple had infringed on one of Samsung's patents. Prior to the trial, the judge had ruled that Samsung had infringed on one other Apple patent. Samsung will receive $158,400 in damages, although they had requested just over $6 million. Apple will receive $119.6 million in damages, although they had requested just over $2 billion and a ban on certain Samsung phones. Some say that a sales ban is unlikely to be approved by the judge. The jury is scheduled to return on Monday to resolve what appears to be a technical mistake in their verdict on one of the patents, and Apple may gain a few hundred thousand dollars in their damages award as a result.

Submission + - Problems with Windows XP caused by Microsoft.

Futurepower(R) writes: We are seeing 4 kinds of problems with Windows XP today at 2 remote locations:

1) One kind of problem is similar to the one in this April 7, 2014 story about computers in Australia: Pop-ups irritate Windows XP's remaining users. Microsoft Security Essentials on computers in the United States give pop-up messages about the MSE service being stopped.

2) Computers are requiring far longer to start, perhaps 12 to 15 minutes. Then the MSE pop-up appears.

3) Microsoft Security Essentials now calls into question whether XP is genuine. These are all computers that have run without issues for several years. The customer bought licenses when Windows XP was first released.

4) We have seen problems with the Windows XP operating system detecting a key stuck down when no keys were pressed on the keyboard. That is a software problem, not a keyboard hardware problem. It causes the system to be un-responsive because the key being detected is not one actually pressed, but is actually a key combination. Again, that is happening on computers that have been trouble-free for years. That problem began happening after a Windows update.

Microsoft said it would support MSE on Windows XP for another year. See the Microsoft article, Microsoft antimalware support for Windows XP. Apparently that support is not happening in the normal way.

Submission + - Microsoft malware attacks taking down XP computers 6

An anonymous reader writes: In an apparent attempt to force Windows XP users to update, Microsoft is now using its Security Essentials program as a malware trojan to make XP machines unusable. It slows the machine down to a crawl, mimicking a virus attack. In other cases, it locks it up completely. The timing couldn't be an accident. Shouldn't this be illegal?


Submission + - PowerVR "Wizard" GPU Is First Mobile Gaming GPU With Hardware Ray Tracing (imgtec.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Imagination Technologies, the people who make the PowerVR line of mobile GPUs, have unveiled a new mobile gaming GPU ("Wizard") that does realtime ray tracing in hardware, at gaming frame rates. It has long been predicted that 3D games would eventually begin to employ true ray tracing to create computationally expensive visual effects like realistic reflections, refractions, shadows and lighting in realtime games. The PowerVR "Wizard" GPU is the first mobile GPU that can do just that in hardware. It remains to be seen how many commercial game engines, game development studios and mobile games will decide to make use of this new interesting new hardware capability. The question whether rival GPU manufacturers like Nvidia or AMD will also jump on the ray tracing bandwagon and put hardware ray tracing units in their future GPUs is also open at this point. If the hardware ray tracing trend catches on, however, and the hardware needed for it becomes mainstream, and more powerful in time, it could make for interesting virtual experiences like "true photoreal VR" when used in conjunction with a VR headset like the Oculus Rift for example.

Submission + - Five Year Old uncovers XBOX ONE log in flaw. (bbc.co.uk)

Smiffa2001 writes: The BBC are reporting that five-year-old Kristoffer Von Hassel from San Diego has uncovered a (frankly embarrassing) security flaw within the XBOX ONE log in screen. Apparently by entering an incorrect password in the first prompt and then filling the second field with spaces, a user can log in without knowing a password to an account.

Young Kristoffer's Dad has submitted the flaw to Microsoft — who have patched the flaw — and have generously provided four free games, $50, a year-long subscription to Xbox Live and an entry on their list of Security Researcher Acknowledgements.

Submission + - Android to ship on 884 million more devices than iPhones, iPads, Macs in 2014 (theinquirer.net)

llebeel writes: Android is expected to lead shipments of devices in 2014, with Gartner projecting that shipments of Android phones, tablets and PCs will hit 1.17 billion this year, rising to 1.36 billion in 2015.

This will be 884 million more shipments than Apple can manage for all its Mac machines plus iPads and iPhones. However, Mac and iOS are also expected to see strong growth from 241 million devices shipped last year to 286 million in 2014 and then 324 million in 2015.

MSDOS is not dead, it just smells that way. -- Henry Spencer