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Comment Bullshit (Score 2) 550

I had the opportunity to burn bridges that needed burning in an exit interview once.

I took complains, issues, and documentation. They took it seriously, and shook the hell out of the department when I left. My manager was "promoted" to a position where he had no staff. Soon after, he 'left.'

Exit interviews are situational, like everything else in life. Treat accordingly.

Comment Re:Sad (Score 3, Insightful) 129

There were three major factors that lead to Heathkit's success, which are no longer true.

1) The cost of manufacturing an item was significantly higher than the cost of the parts.
2) Items were sufficiently simple (or at least discrete) that they could be made at home.
3) Electronics were expensive!

Consider that at one point you could order a kit for about 60% of the price of the finished item. This could save you the modern-day equivalent of hundreds of dollars, and you could assemble it in a week or so.

Nowadays, a chunk of electronics is worth about a hundred bucks or so. Turning it into a kit would be _more_ expensive, and would take three minutes to snap together, if it could be done at home at all.

Comment Why? (Score 1) 214

They're going to save humanity. Why? If there's no one else out there, then we're going to go on, living our grumpy little lives. If there's someone else out there advanced enough to talk to, then they'll discover it too.

Sometimes I think we should take all of our great art, pack it up into a ruddy great rocket, and nuke ourselves back to the stone age and try again.

Comment Re:sleep? (Score 1) 249

Did you miss my last sentence? "And yes, I get paid well during those nine weeks."

I get paid 12 extra hours of straight pay per week of carrying a pager. If it goes off, minimum billing is two hours of overtime (usually 1.5x, but 2x on holidays).

In practice, the pager goes off less than ten times a year across our entire group, so I'll get one or two pages a year - but when they come, they're serious, and the company has no problem paying for it.

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