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Comment: Re:That said... (Score 3, Interesting) 57

by swillden (#47437985) Attached to: Sand-Based Anode Triples Lithium-Ion Battery Performance

Some EVs also let you limit the max that your pack charges up to to further extend lifespan (it's usually destructive both to use the very top end and the bottom end of the discharge range).

That is the theory, but real-world experience with the world's most successful EV (Nissan LEAF) isn't bearing it out. There doesn't appear to be any significant benefit to limiting charging to the 80% level. What is proving to matter, a lot, is temperature. The risks of very cold temperatures are so extreme that the cars have built-in battery heaters (powered by the batteries, obviously) to protect against them, so in practice cold just reduces range, but hot temperatures seriously impact battery longevity.

Another theoretically-predicted battery-killer that is not showing real-world degradation is quick charging. I believe Nissan has even stopped telling people they should limit the amount of level 3 charging they do.

Excellent points about larger capacity batteries needing to survive fewer cycles, though.

Comment: Re:Manager (Score 3, Insightful) 188

by swillden (#47437931) Attached to: New Microsoft CEO Vows To Shake Up Corporate Culture

Their goal has unswervingly been lock-in from top to bottom, while trying to nickel and dime you the whole way.

This is exactly the corporate culture shake-up that's required.

Microsoft has a lot of really smart people, and the financial and other assets needed to put them to work doing great things that can compete and win on their own, actually serving customers rather than trying to lock them in and then exploit them.

MS could be great. But they need a radically different internal dynamic to get there. Will this guy be able to do that? I'm skeptical, but I really hope he can.

Comment: Re:why new balls (Score 1) 143

It looks like every world cup but perhaps a couple has had a different stitch pattern on the ball.

No, it doesn't. They were all somewhat different up until the Telstar introduced the 32-panel, pentagon-and-hexagon stitching pattern, but it appears to me that remained unchanged for almost 40 years, from 1970 to 2006. The balls in between appear to have the same stitching pattern, just different printed designs.

Comment: Re:Void warranty (Score 1) 77

by swillden (#47428297) Attached to: Hacking a Tesla Model S Could Net $10,000 Prize

I dunno.. my LEAF's maintenance schedule for the first 150K miles is pretty much "rotate tires, every 7500 miles, check brakes every 15,000". Checking the brakes, of course, involves checking the brake fluid levels, so there is a fluid. At 150K miles you do have to replace the oil used to cool the battery charger.

But, in general, EVs are very close to maintenance-free.

Comment: Re:translating for the athiests. (Score 1) 144

by swillden (#47416459) Attached to: Physicists Spot Potential Source of 'Oh-My-God' Particles

It amazes me that this needs to be pointed out. Using a deity's name in a secular and preferably angry context is one of the fundaments of swearing, by deus.

And one that is generally frowned upon by religious people. The names are essentially anti-religious, not religious, in nature.

Comment: Re:translating for the athiests. (Score 1) 144

by swillden (#47416141) Attached to: Physicists Spot Potential Source of 'Oh-My-God' Particles

other particles we find similar to it could be given normal names like UHE particles, or super high energy rays but that doesnt secure grant funding in the theocratic Mormon state of Utah.

If the state of Utah is theocratic and makes funding decisions based on particle names, choosing blasphemous ones is not the path to big research bucks. Mormons take the prohibition against taking the name of deity in vain pretty seriously.

Refreshed by a brief blackout, I got to my feet and went next door. -- Martin Amis, _Money_

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