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Comment: it's routine (Score 0) 130

I've worked with the Federal & California Dept of Food & Agriculture. This is a standard treatment for certain dangerous pests. We released millions of sterile medflies, for instance. The method has been successful.

So far as I know, this method hasn't yet been used on the most dangerous species- homo sapiens.

Comment: biological imperative (Score 0) 408

by swell (#48901853) Attached to: Anonymous Asks Activists To Fight Pedophiles In 'Operation Deatheaters'

Mammals, including humans, have a biological directive to protect infants. Even if of a different species. We are programmed. We are easily swayed by this kind of appeal because of that. I am swayed.

But this particular appeal smacks of conspiracy theory. High ranking, respected people joining in and protecting each other while acting in such a perverse manner? A few Catholics may have done so but this accusation is a stretch.

As the facts come forth we will know more. If the accusations are true then let the offenders be castrated and tortured to death. I will volunteer to do it with a rusty blade.

Comment: read your contract (Score 4, Insightful) 214

by swell (#48898777) Attached to: Calif. DMV Back-Pedals On Commercial-Plate Mandate For Ride-Share Drivers

Your insurance papers will probably make it clear that you are NOT covered for commercial use of your vehicle. Even if you don't read the policy, you know in your heart that commercial drivers pay more than ordinary drivers. Lots of people think they can deceive their insurance carrier and save money. The company gets the last laugh when it's time to pay for a claim. Any deception on the part of the insured is likely to negate the contract and no claim will be awarded. Yes, possibly years of payments to that company and all for nothing because you lied.

Like the people who watch your credit worthiness and the people who observe you for terrorist tendencies, the insurance industry has vast resources focused on you. If you try to cheat any insurance company, the word is spread and none of them want to deal with you. If you can get insurance it will be very expensive. Honesty is the best policy.

Comment: Honda CBX exhaust sound engineering (Score 3, Interesting) 818

by swell (#48877723) Attached to: Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

Engineers at Samsung, Apple and other marketing conscious companies are sometimes asked to do unusual tasks. At Honda, planning the introduction of the 6 cylinder CBX motorcycle in the 1970s, sound design became important:

"From the beginning," Irimajiri explained, "our Six produced a smooth jetlike exhaust sound. But with an ordinary exhaust arrangement, it wasn't that close to a jet. We thought if we worked on it we could come up with a motorcycle sound like no one has ever heard before.

"So we sent some engineers to the Hyakuri Japanese Air Force base in Chiba prefecture. For ten days they tape-recorded the sound of Phantom jet fighters, and then came back and designed an exhaust system for the CBX that could duplicate that sound. When I heard it for the first time I was amazed; they had captured the Phantom sound perfectly."
from: http://www.motorcyclespecs.co....

short Wiki article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H...
hear the sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

Comment: trademarked sounds (Score 2) 818

by swell (#48877371) Attached to: Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret

Of course we all benefit from patents, copyright & trademarks, right?

There may be a battle brewing in the sound of cars. ~20 years ago, Harley Davidson tried to trademark the sound of their motorcycle, but that didn't pass. Many others have though and we can expect more as 'sound branding' becomes more widespread.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S...
http://mentalfloss.com/article...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

Comment: deep thoughts... (Score 2) 300

by swell (#48758351) Attached to: The Search For Starivores, Intelligent Life That Could Eat the Sun

necessary

We have a general rule about life: anything that eats must also shit. As this entity wanders the galaxy in search of our sun it will leave a trail for us to follow. We will be able to track the brownian motion of this trail with our new b-ray telescopes. Our best defence may be to ship all of our stored airborn pollutants to a point between the entity and our star. The sun will appear so dim that the entity will choose another victim.

alternately

We already know of such a star eating phenomenon: black holes. We shouldn't jump to the conclusion that they are alive, much less intelligent, but hey nobody messes with them so they must be pretty smart. Fortunately they don't seem to be too mobile so they won't come to us. But they might expand and suck us in...

conversely

A mini hole, smaller than a donut hole, with the mass of a Wolf-Rayet star that mercilessly sucks in anything in its path as it dances around the universe. So small as to be invisible to our instruments, so massive that it warps space time making it even harder to detect. Intelligence? It's just a mindless bully bent on destruction. No smarter than that punk kid dealing drugs on your corner.

obversely

We know that virii can survive extreme heat, cold and even outer space. Even the corrupt environment of your body can host one or more virii. Who's to say the sun is immune? A cozy warm environment with no discernible bacterial competition and a virus could have its way with our sweet sun.

Comment: cio cio cio... (Score 1) 117

by swell (#48757059) Attached to: The Luxury of a Bottomless Bucket of Bandwidth For Georgia Schools

I'm happy for all those CIOs with all that bandwidth. Deliriously happy. But wait, has there ever been a CIO who didn't have lots of bandwidth compared to average people?

Tell me about the real people who benefit from this. The college students, high school students, government employees, etc. Oh, that's for the future? So why are we reading this on slashdot?

Comment: Re:capitals ? (Score 1) 230

by swell (#48749109) Attached to: AMD, Nvidia Reportedly Tripped Up On Process Shrinks

Have a look at Google news where headlines from many newspapers and journals are reproduced. You won't see many publishers capitalizing every single word.

"Proper English"? Your journalism text is from a different century. My copy of The Associated Press Stylebook (2005), says this: "*capitalization* In general, avoid unnecessary capitals. Use a capital letter only if you can justify it by one of the principles listed here." - I cannot find an exception for headlines.

Comment: so 1900s ... (Score 1) 290

by swell (#48707629) Attached to: War Tech the US, Russia, China and India All Want: Hypersonic Weapons

Hypersonic weapons, rail guns, tanks, naval vessels, drones ... all are expensive relics of another century. If the goal is to kill, there are better, cheaper ways for which there is no current defence.

Chemicals and bio weapons are so cheap, so easy to develop and distribute to large and small populations that any money spent on stupid hardware is a ridiculous waste. Any college student (much less an angry mob or small nation) with some talent could wipe out a large population right now in 2015.

Those with the tech, money and talent should be thinking seriously about how to defend against these weapons. This is a new century- wake up!

Factorials were someone's attempt to make math LOOK exciting.

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