Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Disengenous (Score 4, Insightful) 180

by _Sharp'r_ (#47571235) Attached to: Amazon's eBook Math

As an author, I can tell you that Amazon and their eBook pricing means more money (overall) for Authors. Maybe not for the "best seller"s who don't actually sell many books, but their publishing house prints lots of them and sends them out to stores, so while they end up on the bargain rack or destroyed, they still make the NY Times list based on the lay-down. Yeah, the authors people don't actually want to read will ultimately make less money, but the real authors that people like and want to buy from will make a lot more.

There is currently a battle going on in the industry between the special favorites of the big 6 publishing houses and the midlisters and independents. There are very few authors who can get a reasonable deal out of one of the publishing houses. Everyone else is getting contracts which require them to sign away their works forever, sign away any future works in the same genre, sign away all electronic rights, etc... for a $5K advance on a one or two book contract.

The midlisters and indies are running to ebooks and small publishing houses as fast as they can. It's not a mystery why. Amazon will pay 70% on an ebook. A publisher will typically pay maybe 15% (on poorly documented bookscan sales numbers, even on eBooks, which should be exact!) Where they used to purcahse only limited publication rights, which expired after they took the book out of print, now they want contracts where the author will never get their book back, even if the publishing house isn't actually doing anything with it.

If you are a well-known celebrity, or you sell millions of copies, then a big 6 publisher may work with you on somewhat fair terms. Otherwise, they won't edit you (it's gotten much worse over the last few years), they won't market you and they'll barely make sure your latest book stays on store shelves for a month.

The big 6 publishers are not only an issue in terms of IP rights and author payments, but they are also a very bad gatekeeper. Ever wonder why so many old SF authors stopped publishing and much of what is out there now is crap? It's because they're being picked by a publishing house with a NY "editor" who probably doesn't even like SF. They literally drove popular authors (who wrote what people actually wanted to read) out of the business. If an author sold too much (i.e. more than the editor projected), did they reprint and push the book? No, they'd keep the same print run and just stop publishing it when it hit the number projected as the max, usually tiny. Baen was the only real exception of any size in the industry. Jim Baen also did eBooks right from the start (gave old ones away in order to promote newer books in the same series/by the same author). That's all just starting to turn around because of Amazon, on-demand publishing and eBooks. Old famous authors are even starting to put out the books their publishing house stopped selling, or that they couldn't get published in the first place because it wasn't the editor's latest fad.

Also, the big 6 publishing houses have a massively left-leaning bias. They've spent decades now killing the sales numbers of entire genres because the authors were required to toe the line of the latest politically correct movement. You can date books in some genres by the issues and characters the editors required. Many books that adults like have been pushed into YA categories, just because if it it's not "edgy" enough, the NY editors don't want to buy it. Forget about what will sell, they buy what they'll want to tell their NY publishing friends about at the next cocktail party.

Scalzi is the poster-child cheerleader for the big 6 publishing houses. He's on the "inside" of the publishing establishment and does everything he can to defend them. He could care less about SF authors, just about his publishing buddies.

You want the real scoop on Amazon and Authors? Go look at Mad Genius Club, or According to Hoyt.

Comment: JJ meets his Waterloo attacking high tech (Score 0) 393

by Simonetta (#47570623) Attached to: Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

JJ meets his Waterloo when he barges into the electronics lab. Even the black people in the electronics/high tech biz are about as far away from being black as you can be. All fifty of them.

For 400 years, the Afro-american community has been desperately breeding a certain type of individual. A type of person who can survive slave work and still pass their inherent africaness into the next generation. After 20 solid generations, they created the 'African-American'.

The technology industry is almost as old (if you see the industrial revolution and beginning of science as part of the tech industry). It too has created a certain individual type: the nerd.

The A-As and the nerds are about as far apart as people can be. All the characteristics bred into one group were bred out of the other group. They can barely talk to each other, even when they speak the same language.

The tech industry hires two types of people: nerds and people who support the needs of nerds. And since the tech industry is one of the most important industries in the world today, (along with food production and high finance) , they get to choose who they will pay to work for them.

The only reason the nerds will hire black people is as office pets. And then only the ones who know the difference between flux and a capacitor. And the ones "just know" without being specifically taught that you can type "ST7735R" into Google when you want to get the 250 page manual of a thin-flat-transistor screen. And who would never bring up the subject of "mah dih'que" in the workplace. Not too many people like this around, and the ones that are, are already working in the high tech biz.

So let's just redirect our conversation to the vast legacy of great JJ jokes that have written over the past half century. Old standards like:

Q: What's this? fee foh fii - fii fee foh foh A: JJ's telephone number (from 1977)

-or, the more esoteric,

JJ visited the Middle East and met with Palestinian leader Yassir Arafat. After the meeting, JJ was overheard saying to himself: "...been a long time since I said 'Yah, sir' to anyone".

Comment: Yeah, Roo-see-uh (Score 2) 79

Fascinating. If they can detect suspicious fraud nodes, TOR could build into their project a blacklist support that they publish and honor in their code. Then it becomes a whack-a-mole issue, which is better han the current situation.

Ummm...what with Russia trying to de-anonymize TOR and all. Bad Rooskies.

Comment: Re:The Alliance of Artists should lose this suit (Score 0) 287

Lots of old, cranky people have CDs. This is why they included cassette players up through he 2000s as "dual media" player options. Old fucks with money buying cars and why the hell can't I play my Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass cassette?!?!?

Comment: Re:Good luck with that. (Score 1) 287

Well, that applies to any device.

I worked on these devices in the late 90s when they were moving from high end cars to upper mid range. The hardware has the ability to rip radio and phone audio streams, too, but they didn't wanna touch either of those with a 40 foot lawyer's schwantz.

Ripping CDs (and USB sticks) was deemed OK because you could do this at home already. And as long as you couldn't take it back off, they felt OK.

Service has a way to shift all your stuff on a "repair" that is a radio swap, without cloning the HDD, but again that is not end user.

Comment: Re:Appropriate punishment (Score 1) 248

He also labors under the left-wing echo chamber meme about "corporate personhood".

In the ruling, the SC made it expressly clear this was not some corporate pseudo-person's right to speech, but rather the rights of the owners, who carry along the right of free speech whatever they do, like anyone. Congress is specifically disempowered from attaching conditions to speech when creating groups of people, such as a "corporation".

For that matter, the money is speech because it buys use of a press, which is also specified in the First Amendment, and deliberately so, lest rulers want to try to control speech indirectly by banning or controlling the press, which they did all the time, too.

Comment: Re:OKC's match algos suck (Score 1) 161

by Impy the Impiuos Imp (#47554173) Attached to: OKCupid Experiments on Users Too

It's called the "tyrrany of dimensions". The more variables you have, the more data points you need exponentially to derive meaningful partitioning analysis from it, regardless of how clever your distance algorithms are.

And they have hundreds of questions when a dozen would be about all the entire population of Earth could support.

Comment: Re:The only good thing (Score 1) 505

Drug abuse in the tech industry is growing

No. It isn't. Its always been there, always been there in every workplace and every industry, and always will be... it may fluxuate in popularity within certain parameters, but it is nothing new and it is not "growing." Never heard of it? Clue: illicit and illegal drugs are hush hush; loose lips sink ships. "Do not share with Brad... that guy will not shut up. Who is that guy he's talking to... is that a damn reporter?!"

Comment: Re:Customer service? (Score 1) 885

I fly once or twice a year, I'd prefer to be seated first, get comfortable, and not have to worry about everyone else (and not fight for overhead space). In business or first class, people can easily get by you if they are in your row and you were first. I don't think I'm in the miniroty there, as most first class and airline club members seem to enjoy being first. First class and business seats are also more comfortable than anything in the boarding area, and you often start getting service immediately.

Nothing ever becomes real until it is experienced. - John Keats

Working...