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Comment: Re: No (Score 1) 232

by superswede (#48293187) Attached to: Will HP's $200 Stream 11 Make People Forget About Chromebooks?

Thanks. However, last time I played with Chrome Remote Desktop (on Windows) it required interaction on the receiving end (e.g. initiation or at least approval). I'm looking for something that requires zero interaction on the other end, i.e. "Just start the computer and I fix the problem for you". See, my mother sometimes get stuck when another windows gets in front of the web browser and she can do nothing, have an even harder time explaining the problem over the phone - it's at that level. So I need to be able to at a minimum log in remotely a view the screen - ideally take over a run it.

Comment: Re: No (Score 1) 232

by superswede (#48292957) Attached to: Will HP's $200 Stream 11 Make People Forget About Chromebooks?

[Serious question] I'm currently helping my mother on Windows remotely via TightVNC and it actually works alright. As long as it boots up I can do most/all work from across the Atlantic. My mother does have to do anything - no "click to accept" or similar.

Now, what's a similar option for a Chromebook/ChromeOS? Anything that just work without my mother's interaction? I need to be able to get full control just as if I was in front of the machine.

Related, being able to remotely control the device is also why I've retained from getting here a, preferably an Android, tablet, because of the built-in security making remote access tricky. I understand that one get around it if one root it, but if imagine the user base doing that is so small that the quality of such software is just not there yet, or?

Comment: Re: Shash-job-vertisement (Score 1) 205

by superswede (#48202151) Attached to: The One App You Need On Your Resume If You Want a Job At Google

True that native code is faster than plain R, but from your benchmarking it sounds like you're not doing things properly in R. If you know your vectorization and how and when objects are copied/allocated, then R is super fast. Nearly as fast as native code, because you're effectively using R to call native code with minimal overhead.

Comment: Re:What's wrong with typing? (Score 1) 77

by superswede (#45430041) Attached to: Skype Is Evaluating Adding Typing Suppression Feature

Solved a related issue a couple of years where we wanted audible feedback on the keyboarded being types. The use case was a complete mute person Text-To-Speech (TTS) generator to talk over phone/VoIP (in this case it was Skype). Without being able to hear the keyboard clicks the receiver of the call gets long periods of silence while the "speaker" is typing the next word. This silence is confusing and often leads to interrupts from both parts, similar to the problems one gets with walkie talkies. By adding virtual keyboard typing sounds, the other party (the "listener") knows that the "speaker" is typing and naturally waits. It was really helpful! (This was a Windows machine and the solution we ended up with was to use Sound Pilot [http://www.colorpilot.com/soundpilot.html].)

Comment: Re:KeePass (Score 1) 268

by superswede (#36039766) Attached to: LastPass Password Service Hacked

Maybe I'm paranoid, but I really don't like copying passwords to the clipboard. I'd much prefer some kind of automatic key pressing function.

From http://keepass.info/help/v2/autotype_obfuscation.html:

"The Auto-Type feature of KeePass is very powerful: it sends simulated keypresses to other applications. This works with all Windows applications and for the target applications it's not possible to distinguish between real keypresses and the ones simulated by Auto-Type. This at the same time is the main disadvantage of Auto-Type, because keyloggers can eavesdrop the simulated keys. That's where Two-Channel Auto-Type Obfuscation (TCATO) comes into play.

TCATO makes standard keyloggers useless. It uses the Windows clipboard to transfer parts of the auto-typed text into the target application. Keyloggers can see the Ctrl-V presses, but do not log the actual contents pasted from the clipboard.

Clipboard spies don't work either, because only parts of the sensitive information is transferred on this way.

Anyway, it's not perfectly secure (and unfortunately cannot be made by theory). None of the currently available keyloggers or clipboard spies can eavesdrop an obfuscated auto-type process, but it is theoretically possible to write a dedicated spy application that specializes on logging obfuscated auto-type."

Comment: Core setup for remote maintenance (Score 1) 253

by superswede (#33405272) Attached to: Persistent Home Videoconferencing Solution?

Having access to the remote machine(s) will be very useful, because there will always be something that breaks and you'll need to admin that computer. I maintain a Windows 95 computer trans-Atlantic via remote VNC access. Basic setup:

Dynamic DNS:
1. Signup for a DynDNS.com account. Free.
2. Install the DynDNS client IP updater on the remote machine. Having it update its IP number at the DynDNS.com account. This will

Comment: Re: British Airways pilots, always classy. (Score 1) 283

by superswede (#31869820) Attached to: Iceland Volcano's Ash Grounds European Air Travel
Yeah, classy pilots:

British Airways Flight 5390 was a British Airways flight between Birmingham International Airport in England and Málaga, Spain. On 10 June 1990 an improperly installed pane of the windscreen failed, blowing the plane's captain halfway out of the aircraft, with his body firmly pressed against the window frame.

URL: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Airways_Flight_5390

Comment: Hack: Use other RSS feed via redirects (Score 1) 185

by superswede (#30656384) Attached to: Kodak Wireless Picture Frames Open To Public

The hardware seems to be hardwired to framechannel.com. By using a (wireless) router that can either

  1. do URL redirects, or
  2. use a custom DNS service

it should be possible to use an alternative service, or setup your own RSS feed. There are lots of things you then could to.

Also, it would be possible to "hide" behind a hard-to-guess RSS URL, or possibly have the RSS server to only respond to certain IP numbers.

Comment: Re:Irony (Score 1) 118

by superswede (#28189385) Attached to: A Real-World Test of the Verizon MiFi

Irony is not about reciprocity. If person A does thing X, and somehow it comes back and bites them in the ass, that is not ironic". Instead, "Irony is the use of words in a way to conceal true intention with literal intention. More clearly, irony is when you say one thing but mean another." [not the thing you are describing].

Source: http://www.sc.tri-bit.com/Irony

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