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Why Tor Users Should Be Cautious About P2P Privacy 122

An anonymous reader writes "I went across your post a few days ago saying that a machine connected to the Internet was all one needed to spy on most BitTorrent users of the Internet. I followed the link to find out that those researchers from INRIA claimed their attacks also worked for BitTorrent users on Tor. I didn't believe it at first, but then today I found this link on the Tor Project. It seems their attacks don't only link your real IP to your BitTorrent files on Tor but also to the web pages that you're browsing! Tell me it's a joke." No joke, but according to Jacob Appelbaum (a Tor developer), the security flaw is more nuanced — and the fault of software outside of Tor. Read on for his explanation of how the privacy benefits of Tor can be easily lost.

Comment Re:Now it gets interesting.... (Score 1) 501

I'm not sure if you're a troll or just seriously misinformed...but opera mini is currently in the app store downloaded to many people's iphones. As for iPhone not having HTML5, that's also a fairly ridiculous assertion to make, since they are one of the major backers encouraging its adoption, going so far as to make major media outlets rework sites to remove flash dependencies. I do agree Apple has made a few dickish moves here recently, but this comment seems to be full of misinformation on dick moves that are completely contrary to Apple's longstanding positions. As far as the android/winmo stuff, you seem to be confusing HTML5 and Flash 10.1 support, and the assertion that apple's devices couldn't do video is demonstrably false. Fact check much?

Submission + - Cable Companies Restrict Olympics on Net 2

TechForensics writes: NBC won't let you see replays on the NBC site unless your cable operator
gets a cut.

In a slap in the face to all netizens who expect Cable programming
interests to be distinct from those of their ISP, visitors to the NBC
website wanting to see replays of Olympic events get the following

"You have selected a premium video (e.g. live stream or full-event
replay). Please follow the simple process below to view this free
and other GREAT PRIZES!

To begin this ONE-TIME ONLY process, please identify your HOME cable, satellite or IPTV provider.

NOTE: This is required ONLY for viewing live competition & full-event replays on NBCOlympics.com during the Vancouver Games.

(List of providers)

If your cable, satellite or IPTV provider is NOT listed above, then it's not in partnership with NBC Olympics. Don't worry though, you ALREADY CAN VIEW hundreds of video clips such as athlete features and Torino highlights, and you will have access to event highlights during the Vancouver Games. Click here to watch video now."

Apparently a subscription to MSNBC or CNBC is de rigeur. That is not free if you do not have
a "premium cable package".

What's going on here? Are we to see more of this kind of thing?

Comment When Hell freezes over... (Score 5, Interesting) 212

As a gamer who has made purchasing decisions based on the fact that PSN is free and Xbox Live costs money, I believe this would be a big negative for Sony at a time when they are actually making headway in the console wars. The only way I see this working out is if all the current services offered by PSN are free and these new features are optional, not essential for having a good gaming experience, and priced modestly. Otherwise, I think this will amount to Sony shooting themselves in the foot when they have momentum, just like they did with the PS2 to PS3 transition.

Submission + - TSA seized a travel blogger's laptop (huffingtonpost.com)

An anonymous reader writes: This morning two black sedans with TSA special agents came to the Connecticut home of blogger Steven Frischling and walked out with his laptop computer. They promised to return it, but later claimed that there were "bad sectors" on the drive.
The agents were looking for the anonymous source who leaked a TSA Security Directive which advised airlines to restrict passengers from getting out of their seats, concealing their hands, or accessing carry-on luggage an hour before landing.

Submission + - ClimateGate: 30 Years in the Making (joannenova.com.au)

An anonymous reader writes: Mohib Ebrahim, who designs professional timelines for exhibitions, has created a visual history of climategate titled "ClimateGate: 30 years in the Making" which depicts "... the full timeline of ClimateGate, laying out the analysis, graphs, emails and history of the scandal as revealed by dozens of researchers over the past weeks, months and years." Available in many sizes for printing and viewing here

Submission + - Amazon DNS down?

An anonymous reader writes: www.amazon down? DNS doesn't resolve in 3 different geos

Submission + - Fox Threatens to Leave TWC Unless They Pay Up (mediapost.com) 1

wkurzius writes: News Corp. is demanding $1 per cable subscriber from Time Warner Cable and will pull their Fox channels as of January 1st if they don't comply. News Corp. believes that they need two revenue streams in this day and age in order to compete with cable networks, and Time Warner naturally doesn't want to pay. Senator John Kerry (D-Mass.) has stepped in to try and settle the argument.

Submission + - Comcast pays for blocking large file transfers (yahoo.com)

hessian writes: Comcast Corp. has agreed to pay up to $16 million to settle a class-action lawsuit accusing the cable TV operator of delaying transfers of large movie and music files despite promises of unfettered Internet access.

Submission + - SPAM: Arrington Responds To the JooJoo

itwbennett writes: Not normally 'one to enjoy a casual read of a lawsuit,' blogger Peter Smith admits to finding the suit Michael Arrington is filing against Fusion Garage over the JooJoo (nee CrunchPad) fascinating. 'Skip to page 4, starting with item 11,' says Smith. 'At this point I don't know what to think,' Smith writes. 'Everytime I get close to pretty much accepting Arrington's story at face value, he pulls something that makes me stop and reexamine his arguments.' For example, says Smith, in one bullet point in Arrington's latest salvo, he calls out the press, saying 'it is irresponsible for press to link to the pre-sale site.' 'This attempt to directly sway the press away from Fusion Garage really spikes my suspicion meter' says Smith. 'After all, Arrington is the press. If I started writing screeds advising him on what he should or should not say about a product, what would he think?'
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Tamiflu's Efficacy In Doubt (theatlantic.com) 1

sackvillian writes: Investigations into Roche's claims that its drug, Tamiflu, is safe and effective have shown that there are serious problems with the science. Considering that the US has a stockpile of $1.5 billion of this drug, and right now there's a lot of commotion about climate-gate and swine flu scares, this news couldn't come at a worse time.

Submission + - AT&T's Odd Retail Strategy (daniweb.com)

rsmiller510 writes: During a trip to the AT&T Store yesterday, I was surprised that the staff shuttled us off to retail partners Best Buy and Radio Shack instead of trying to sell us a phone in the store. Seems like the in-store focus is iPhones and data plans.

Comment Re:Flu !DNA (Score 2, Interesting) 80

Good catch on the RNA vs. DNA. However, this would not effect how quickly a vaccine could be made with this technique nor its efficacy, as it is just training the plasma cells to recognize a folded conformation and produce antibodies to bind that 3d conformation, allowing the immune system to clear it after the virus is bound (opsonized).

I have a theory that it's impossible to prove anything, but I can't prove it.