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Submission + - Tattoo Removal Becomes More Popular Medical Procedure

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "FoxNews reports that a tattoo of a giant iguana curling up her chest seemed like a good idea to Kaylie when she was younger but she recently made the decision to have it removed to improve her job prospects. “I was tired of wearing turtle necks to job interviews, and I didn’t like the way the more closed-minded people judged me just because I had a tattoo," After spending more than $2,000 on laser treatments to have her ink removed, Kaylie is now tattoo-free on her chest and lower neck, a story that repeats itself a thousand times a day, says tattoo removal specialist Dr. Glenn Messina. “I have heard from most all of my clients that they’re being discriminated against in the workplace and they can’t find work. Even when it’s a beautiful tattoo, a lot of employers don’t like it." In a study conducted by The Patient’s Guide, the number of tattoo removal procedures grew by 32% from 2011 to 2012 and the majority of people having tattoos removed cited “employment reasons” as their motivation for having the procedure. Individuals without tattoos are approximately twice as likely to get hired as individuals with body art that can be seen in professional dress, says employment specialist Andy McCall and if two candidates are equally qualified for the same job and one has a tattoo, nine times out of ten, the candidate without the body art will be hired for the position, McCall adds. "There is a fine line between having someone think it’s ‘cool’ and having someone wonder, ‘Is this person someone I can count on to mentor me, or is this someone who had a bad streak in life?’”"

Submission + - Why Distributing Music As 24-bit/192kHz Downloads Is Pointless (

An anonymous reader writes: A recent post at provides a long and incredibly detailed explanation of why 24-bit/192kHz music downloads — touted as being of 'uncompromised studio quality' — don't make any sense. The post walks us through some of the basics of ear anatomy, sampling rates, and listening tests, finally concluding that lossless formats and a decent pair of headphones will do a lot more for your audio enjoyment than a 24/192 recordings. 'Why push back against 24/192? Because it's a solution to a problem that doesn't exist, a business model based on willful ignorance and scamming people. The more that pseudoscience goes unchecked in the world at large, the harder it is for truth to overcome truthiness... even if this is a small and relatively insignificant example.'

Submission + - UK Claims Link Between Child Porn and Terrorism ( 3

Brian Ribbon writes: "The Times reports claims made by government officials and security services, regarding an alleged correlation between the use of indecent images and terrorist activity. According to the article, "secret coded messages are being embedded into child pornographic images, and paedophile websites are being exploited as a secure way of passing information between terrorists" and "it is not clear whether the terrorists were more interested in the material for personal gratification or were drawn to child porn networks as a secure means of sending messages." The correlation is likely to be false; under UK law, nude photographs of all minors — including those who are over the age of consent — are illegal, so it's not surprising that many people (including terrorists) are found to have illegal material when their computers are searched. In reality, this story is probably just a poor attempt to justify the government's proposed big brother database."

Submission + - George Orwell Blogs from the Grave

flaming error writes: "The Orwell Prize organization will, every day, starting tomorrow, post the entry George Orwell made in his personal Diary for the same day 70 years prior.

'When one reads any strongly individual piece of writing, one has the impression of seeing a face somewhere behind the page', wrote George Orwell, in his 1939 essay on Charles Dickens.

From 9th August 2008, you will be able to gather your own impression of Orwell's face from reading his most strongly individual piece of writing: his diaries. The Orwell Prize is delighted to announce that, to mark the 70th anniversary of the diaries, each diary entry will be published on this blog exactly seventy years after it was written, allowing you to follow Orwell's recuperation in Morocco, his return to the UK, and his opinions on the descent of Europe into war in real time. The diaries end in 1942, three years into the conflict.

I'm not sure what "real time" means here, but it looks to be a wonderful way to revisit some interesting times."

The first version always gets thrown away.