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Comment: Re:Same old thing... (Score 1) 457

by suggsjc (#32350190) Attached to: Pacific Northwest At Risk For Mega-Earthquake

We just don't have any good idea as to how to tell when it's going to happen.

What if we did, or if we could "trigger" the earthquake to happen (even if it would still be an ~8+)? I wonder what the "total cost" would be to prepare everyone, evacuate, etc. as compared to it "randomly happening"?

I mean according to your post, it IS going to happen and the longer it waits to do so, the larger it will be. Could it even be possible to "beat the earthquake to the punch" by say setting off explosives (even nuclear if necessary) in strategic areas so as to force it to happen?

So again, even if we could do it, would it be worth it? Could we get all of the nearby residents to buy into the concept? The end result will be catastrophic either way, but even if you completely ignore the "cost of life" factor (I for one don't want to have to come up with a dollar figure), would the cost to coordinate the effort be justified?

Anyway, sorry for the (potentially) off-topic post but the thought popped into my head and just wanted to see what others thought about both whether it would be possible and also if it would be worth it.

Comment: Re:Anonymous Cow (Score 2, Interesting) 305

by suggsjc (#32292886) Attached to: Google Outlines Feature Set For Android 2.2

I haven't found a better or faster browser for a mobile device yet

Tried microB (the default browser) on the N900?

FWIW, I'm also really liking Opeara Mobile 10 (on the n900) as well. I particularly like it in portrait mode as it scales very well horizontally and you are able to see a considerable amount vertically.

I don't think either one is "perfect" as I use both depending on what I'm trying to do. I'm finding Opera a little faster to render at the expense of a little stability (and no flash, which I'm ok with). MicroB is rock solid and renders everything just like on a desktop browser (including flash), and I can use it to access all of my online banking.

Conclusion, we aren't there yet, but getting closer. I doubt there will ever be (or should be) "one true" browser as competition is good and everyone is going to have personal needs/preferences. Also, froyo looks interesting...but I think the carriers are going to make it or break it (at least for the non-custom rom crowd).

Comment: Re:Doesn't link it to YOU (Score 1) 175

by suggsjc (#32253066) Attached to: EFF Says Forget Cookies, Your Browser Has Fingerprints
Either I'm missing something or your creating a strawman.

First you say "A lot of http access logs are web-accessible." My guess would be that mainly smaller/lower trafficked sites (not that the information couldn't be valuable), are the ones making their logs available whereas the more popular sites would do their due diligence and secure them. However you then write "So if I can associate you with your browser signature on ANY site..." Like I said, I may be missing something, but can you, Cmdr-Absurd, get access to the logs to ANY site and compile that information across ALL the sites on the web? If you can, please let the /. community know how because I'd say you've stumbled across a very large security/privacy hole.

Comment: Re:your first sentence is technically flawed (Score 1) 531

by suggsjc (#31822374) Attached to: Ubuntu on a Dime
You make a valid but snarky point. However, most of those tasks you mention are either a "solved problem" or scale with hardware fairly lineraly. If you've built the infrastructure to handle 500Gb of storage space the capacity planning for handling 1Tb is not that much of additional effort. Yes it costs more money than simply "add a new hard drive" but if you are growing at such a rapid rate and/or are providing for such a large number of users then you must also consider all of the collective time/effort required by the users to manage their storage quotas and that cost as well.

All in all, I don't think there are too many cases where it makes more sense to artificially keep the storage space low when that decision causes any significant amount of extra time/overhead for the users consuming the service. Granted I don't have any facts or figures to back my argument up, but if you have some that prove otherwise I'd love to see them.

Here is a wired article that somewhat backs up my point (if not indirectly).
http://www.wired.com/techbiz/it/magazine/17-07/mf_freer

Comment: Re:DynDNS honours their own one time donatations (Score 1) 125

by suggsjc (#30742160) Attached to: DynDNS.com Acquires EveryDNS
Exactly. I've been a supporting user for several years as well. I have not once had any issues with their service. I did have a question once, so I sent an email and was answered within minutes.

Anyway, I hope that DynDNS will continue to honor the "donate once for lifetime service" at least for those existing users covered under that plan. But even if they don't, so long as they keep the same level of service, then I would not mind paying (within reason).

Comment: Re:People work on the "easy" problems (Score 1, Insightful) 195

by suggsjc (#30312132) Attached to: Linux Kernel 2.6.32 Released

People tend to gravitate towards problems that they think they can solve--and ignore the problems they don't understand or don't want to deal with.

I think that should have read

Engineers tend to gravitate towards problems that they think they can solve--and ignore the problems they don't understand or don't want to deal with.

Comment: Re:No thanks, last.fm (Score 1) 125

by suggsjc (#30270642) Attached to: The Technology Behind Last.fm

The same general pool of artists is popular on Last.fm as is popular on radio.

So are you suggesting that because popular music is...popular that it is inherently "bad music" and that once anything becomes "popular" that it was due to the "uninformed masses"? Yes, there is horrible music being created and promoted that gets to the top, but do you have an inherent dislike for something just because it reaches a certain level of notoriety?

Comment: Re:Gee, it's almost like they have a monopoly or s (Score 1) 330

by suggsjc (#30143812) Attached to: Less Than Free

Arguably, bundling turn-by-turn navigation software in Android is similar bundling IE in Windows (enter the MS anti-trust suits) but it's a tough argument to make when the whole lot is open-source.

Could you please show me where the code (and subsequent api call documentation) to recreate turn-by-turn navigation on a non-android platform are publicly available/accessible? I'd love to port this to maemo, but you'll find that Android the OS is open-source, but many of the apps that make it valuable are still closed and controlled by Google. I don't necessarily have a problem with this, but I think many people (wrongly) assume that just because Android is open-source they can tinker with not only the core OS, but all of the applications as well. The Android Market is NOT like a traditional linux repository where you "install" your apps from.

Comment: Re:MOD PARENT DOWN (Score 1) 555

by suggsjc (#30032960) Attached to: Verizon Droid Tethering Comes At a Hefty Price

But the people who want him to fight the case can't afford his fees

I think you underestimate the power of large groups. If someone can rally enough people around a (worthy) cause...enough to donate $5 here, $20 there and the occasional $100-$1000 then large sums are not as unreachable as you would think.

That however depends on someone actually taking the lead and being able to get people to rally around said cause...

Comment: Re:I have a better idea (Score 1) 220

by suggsjc (#29768187) Attached to: The Sad State of the Mobile Web
I guess it all depends on features and scope, but the "mobile web" is only as complicated as you want to make it. If you have good markup, then things translate very well to mobile phones.

In general, there are two types of mobile browsers. Ones that try to emulate the "real web" (ie. iPhone/Safari, Opera Mini, etc) and ones that just strip out all of the css and just display the text (ie. Blackberry browser).

I've found that if you take a look at your site without css enabled (in Firefox, View -> Page Style -> No Style), if the site looks good and is functional, then you'll be "ok" on mobile phones. If your site looks horrible, then you should probably not consider yourself a web developer...

Those who do not understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it, poorly. -- Henry Spencer

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