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Comment: And... (Score 5, Informative) 380

by stressclq (#32838898) Attached to: Crack the Code In US Cyber Command's Logo
It was quite swiftly found out to be the MD5 hash of (remove quotes): "USCYBERCOM plans, coordinates, integrates, synchronizes and conducts activities to: direct the operations and defense of specified Department of Defense information networks and; prepare to, and when directed, conduct full spectrum military cyberspace operations in order to enable actions in all domains, ensure US/Allied freedom of action in cyberspace and deny the same to our adversaries."

News at 11..

Comment: Roddenberry’s Mac (Score 1) 227

by stressclq (#30291786) Attached to: Typewriters, Computers, and Creating?
Considering Gene Roddenberry’s Mac was auctioned for $8,260 back in October which was also discussed here, I'll have to say yes, it would make some money, though the number would probably depend on the owners popularity. For example I am no crazy fan of Cormac McCarthy, but just imagine what the Ubuntu box of someone in the likes of Elvis or Marilyn Monroe or Linus Torvalds (as mentioned above) would fetch if it was to be auctioned.

Comment: Hoping for Windows 7's success... (Score 5, Interesting) 350

by stressclq (#29975790) Attached to: Firefox Passes IE6 In Browser Share

What this article tells me is that a quarter of the internet users are still using a web browser that was released on August 27, 2001. From a peak market share of %95, it has only come down to %23 in eight years (and change). This survival is against massive "IE6 must die" campaigns, introduction of fairly decent, and standards compliant (comparatively) browsers such as Firefox, Chrome the ever improving Safari and the somehow still surviving gem named Opera.

I was hoping that the rise of social applications like Facebook, Youtube, Digg and popular business applications such as the ones made by 37signals would put an end, a final nail in the coffin if you like, to this monster from the digital stone age.

But obviously I was, surely together with a whole bunch of other fellow /.'ers, wrong. Obviously, the failure of adaptation of Vista played some role in this outcome. But seeing that building a better (faster, compliant, etc.) browser is not the answer, I'm now genuinely hoping that Windows 7 will massively succeed so that we can put an end to this abomination.

The Internet

+ - AU internet fails pigeon test-> 3

Submitted by bennyboy64
bennyboy64 (1437419) writes "A pigeon has transferred a 700 megabyte file faster than a car or a broadband internet connection in rural Australia. The bizarre experiment, conducted in rural New South Wales, was prompted by a comment made by the Prime Minister Kevin Rudd that 'Australians would be left using carrier pigeons for the future rather than accessing an internationally competitive broadband network' if the opposition party had their way. A similar test had been done in South Africa where an IT company tested their own internet speeds by replacing it with a carrier pigeon. That pigeon also won."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:They might lose (Score 2, Interesting) 865

by mwvdlee (#29948144) Attached to: Apple Says Booting OS X Makes an Unauthorized Copy

If - by some miracle - Apple would be legally forced to allow 3rd parties to install OSX on non-Apple hardware they would be knowingly selling OSX for non-Apple hardware. Wouldn't that automatically give them SOME support requirements?

Can't Apple just lower the service level for OSX?

How do companies like Microsoft and Red Hat handle this?

Role Playing (Games)

+ - Blizzard files suit against emulator operator->

Submitted by p0werhouse
p0werhouse (1045446) writes "Most would agree, Blizzard makes great games. Some of us, however, do not have $15 a month to spend on playing World of Warcraft, or just want to play once in awhile. In this vain, we play on emulated servers which attempt to simulate official servers with wholly independent code and development. The servers then fool the official client, through a server redirect, into connecting to them. I have often considered, though, the legal implications of doing so and wondered what legal defenses the operators have. It seems we shall soon find out as Blizzard has pressed charges against Alyson Reeves, operator of popular WoW emulator Scape Gaming (formally Wowscape)."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Esoteric Naming System (Score 5, Interesting) 255

by stressclq (#29670091) Attached to: NASA Discovers Giant Ring Around Saturn

Couldn't help myself, from TFA (emphasis added):

Before the discovery Saturn was known to have seven main rings named A through E and several faint unnamed rings.

What kind of a messed up numeral system do they use in NASA?

Joking aside, the ring divisions are labelled (from the closest to furthest) : D, C, B, A then F, G and finally E as the outermost ring.

Wonder what they will name this one, anyone good with sequence puzzles?

Networking

+ - Open source NAS Clustering

Submitted by dago
dago (25724) writes "I've been searching for a solution to make a "network raid" out of different NAS and storage servers, each with 2-4 HDD. In particular, I'm looking at a way to aggregate that space in a RAID5 way, to have a large, redundant space for backup and archiving. Access would be via SMB/CIFS or FTP and performance doesn't really matter.

I've already tried solutions like Lustre or GlusterFS, but they doesn't seem to provide directly "RAID5 over TCP/IP", just stripping, mirroring or both (RAID 0, 1, 1+0). On the commercial side, "scale out NAS" products usually requires to buy new, specific hardware and aims at very large installations.

Did anybody already aggregated NAS storage using open source components ? How ?"

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