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Submission + - MSL Landing Timeline: What to Expect Tonight ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: When the Curiosity rover lands on Mars later tonight, she'll be executing a complex series of maneuvers. JPL will be relying on the Mars Odyssey orbiter to relay telemetry back to Earth in time-delayed real-time, and if all goes well, we'll be getting confirmation on the success (or failure) of each entry, descent, and landing phase, outlined in detail here.

Submission + - Raspberry Pi To Cross The Ocean In Autonomous Boat (

lukehopewell1 writes: The Raspberry Pi is a triumph in computing, and it's now set to become a triumph in robotics as one developer plans to build a model boat around it and sail it across the Atlantic Ocean, completely unmanned.

It's codenamed "FishPi" and will see a model boat sail across the Atlantic all by itself save for a camera, GPS module, compass and solar panels. It's only a proof of concept right now, but if this guy set it up on Kickstarter and offered a live stream of the crossing, I'd be opening my wallet.


Submission + - Tattoo Removal Becomes More Popular Medical Procedure

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "FoxNews reports that a tattoo of a giant iguana curling up her chest seemed like a good idea to Kaylie when she was younger but she recently made the decision to have it removed to improve her job prospects. “I was tired of wearing turtle necks to job interviews, and I didn’t like the way the more closed-minded people judged me just because I had a tattoo," After spending more than $2,000 on laser treatments to have her ink removed, Kaylie is now tattoo-free on her chest and lower neck, a story that repeats itself a thousand times a day, says tattoo removal specialist Dr. Glenn Messina. “I have heard from most all of my clients that they’re being discriminated against in the workplace and they can’t find work. Even when it’s a beautiful tattoo, a lot of employers don’t like it." In a study conducted by The Patient’s Guide, the number of tattoo removal procedures grew by 32% from 2011 to 2012 and the majority of people having tattoos removed cited “employment reasons” as their motivation for having the procedure. Individuals without tattoos are approximately twice as likely to get hired as individuals with body art that can be seen in professional dress, says employment specialist Andy McCall and if two candidates are equally qualified for the same job and one has a tattoo, nine times out of ten, the candidate without the body art will be hired for the position, McCall adds. "There is a fine line between having someone think it’s ‘cool’ and having someone wonder, ‘Is this person someone I can count on to mentor me, or is this someone who had a bad streak in life?’”"

Submission + - Should ISPs cut off bot-infected users? ( 1

richi writes: "There's no doubt that botnets are a major threat to the safety and stability of the internet — not to mention the cleanliness of your inbox. After years of failure to act, could we finally be seeing ISPs waking up to their responsibilities? While ISPs can't prevent users getting infected with bots, they are in a superb position to detect the signs of infection. Contractually, the ISP would be reasonably justified in cutting off a user from the internet, as bot infection would be contrary to the terms of the ISP's acceptable-use policy.

However, the main counter-argument is that consumer ISPs operate on razor-thin margins. Perhaps there's light at the end of the tunnel. After last week's news that Comcast is warning customers found to be infected, today, Microsoft's Scott Charney spoke at the International Security Solutions Europe Conference in Berlin, Germany, advocating bot detection and remediation.

Is this an idea who's time has come?"


Submission + - Fifty Meter Asteroid Might Hit Earth in 2098 (

eldavojohn writes: The Bad Astronomer brings word of an asteroid discovered with a tiny chance of hitting Earth. While it's only 50 meters wide, it could have the impact of a 20 megaton bomb. It's still twenty million miles away so if it hits us, it won't happen until 2098. The real story here is how a remarkable telescoped dubbed Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System that went operational in May found its first potential target in our growing impact alert system for Earth.

Submission + - Thousands of sites taken offline in 4Chan misfire ( 1

littlekorea writes: Anonymous attackers have taken aim at Australia's anti-piracy lobby, AFACT today, in a concerted 12-hour effort. Some 8,000 other Australian websites using the same web host were taken out in the process. The AFACT site resumed service after several hours of downtime. Similar attacks have been leveled at anti-piracy groups such as the MPAA and RIAA.

Submission + - Sorting Algorithm Breaks Giga-sort Barrier ( 2

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers at the University of Virginia have recently open sourced an algorithm capable of sorting at a rate of one billion (integer) keys per second using a GPU. Although GPUs are often assumed to be poorly suited for algorithms like sorting, their results are several times faster than the best known CPU-based sorting implementations.

Submission + - Tech's Dark Secret: It’s All About Age 2

theodp writes: Universities really should tell engineering students what to expect in the long term and how to manage their technical careers. But since they're not, Vivek Wadwha uses his TechCrunch bully pulpit to give students a heads-up about the road ahead. Citing ex-Microsoft CTO David Vaskevitch's belief that younger workers have more energy and are sometimes more creative, Wadwha warns that reports of ageism's death have been greatly exaggerated. While encouraging managers to consider the value of the experience older techies bring, Wadwha also offers some get-real advice to those whose hair is beginning to grey: 1) Move up the ladder into management, architecture, or design; switch to sales or product management; jump ship and become an entrepreneur. 2) If you're going to stay in programming, realize that the deck is stacked against you, so be prepared to earn less as you gain experience. 3) Keep your skills current — to be coding for a living when you're 50, you'll need to be able to out-code the new kids on the block. Wadwha's piece strikes a chord with 50-something Dave Winer, who calls the rampant ageism 'really f***ed up,' adding that, 'It's probably the reason why we keep going around in the same loops over and over, because we chuck our experience, wholesale, every ten years or so.' Well, Microsoft did struggle with problems that IBM solved in the '60s.

Submission + - Quiptxt massive privacy fail (

stevegee58 writes: My Google alert on privacy issues returned this tidbit today on reddit:

"QuipText is a service that lets iPhone users send picture messages to others over the internet. The service works by saving the image as a webpage on their server with its own unique URL and then texting the person in question the url. The only problem? They're only using 5 alphanumeric, noncase-sensitive characters for the URL, meaning it can be brute forced in a few seconds."

So all those naughties the users uploaded via this service were pawed through, lulled over and used for harassment of Facebook users.

Without life, Biology itself would be impossible.