Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:a different perspective (Score 1) 687

by stefski66 (#40247517) Attached to: A Day In the Life of a "Booth Babe"

It's the same with my dwarf son ! He goes to clubs at night, and offers his body to be thrown away by other people for fun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwarf_tossing). He is tired at the end of the show but it's good money and he meets interesting people. He's not an object - he knows that he's being mocked, but he is born like that and is proud of it. He gets hurt occasionally, but he's a, well, big boy and can handle himself.

Jesus, I'm glad I don't live where people debate this shit endlessly.

Because, the way women or tossed dwarfs are considered in this situation has nothing to do with the way women and dwarfs are considered in this society. Glass ceiling, anyone ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_ceiling

Comment: Re:Another "solution" without a problem (Score 1) 249

by stefski66 (#39549807) Attached to: Flying Car Makes Successful Maiden Flight

or "another solution without a problem, that will cause problems". This can work as advertized ("Avoid traffic jams") if it's expensive and few people can afford it. But if ever it becomes mainstream, this will generate an amount of traffic that will need to be regulated, and here it comes, 'air traffic jam'. Yes, you'll be able to commute from farther and less accessible places. But the commute time will be the same.

Comment: new input=success; new output=failure (Score 1) 215

by stefski66 (#35977148) Attached to: Nintendo Chief: Consumers Don't Understand 3DS Yet

Have you noticed that this equation seems to apply fairly well to nintendo products ?

by order of appearance:

super nintendo, better graphics (output) = success
gameboy, worst graphics (output), not really new input = success
virtual boy, new output method = failure
gamecube, 3D games, "new" output = fair, but not really a success
DS, stylus input, new input = success
WII, wiimote, new input = success
3DS, 3D, new output = bad start (according to nintendo people)

When explaining nintendo's products successes compared to more powerful console, people sometimes say that good graphics are not enough, but good games are important. It seems that novel input also plays a role here... Let's see how this applies to 3DS in a few month...

Comment: Re:OOP in freshman year (Score 3, Interesting) 755

by stefski66 (#35622126) Attached to: CMU Eliminates Object Oriented Programming For Freshman

What is worse, many of these introductory courses were given in Java - producing students who were completely lost when the black box of the Java runtime and libraries was taken away - e.g. when having to transition to C/C++.

What is worse, many of these introductory courses were given in C/C++ - producing students who were completely lost when the black box of the C/C++ runtime and libraries was taken away (stl, libstdc++, libc, stdlib/malloc) - e.g. when having to transition to Assembly.

What is worse, many of these introductory courses were given in Assembly - producing students who were completely lost when the black box of the Assembly runtime and libraries was taken away (OS virtual mem) - e.g. when having to transition to an OS-less embedded machine.

What is worse, many of these introductory courses were given in Assembly on powerful CPU - producing students who were completely lost when the black box of the runtime support was taken away (CPU mem protecion, FPU) - e.g. when having to transition to a simpler CPU.

Point is: whatever the language, it always come with support that you don't want to cope with in 95% of the case. Garbage collection (a la java) is one of these. Mem Protection, FPU, virtual memory (remember handles in MacOS before X ?) etc. I don't want to re-implement them, thanks.

Comment: Re:Tried it today (Score 1) 470

by stefski66 (#34998470) Attached to: LibreOffice 3.3 Released Today

ok, I copy a previous message I wrote about ribbon (http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=1379697&cid=29527359):

In short: Microsoft (which I do not support usually) people has done a lot of work usability-wise (see the end of this msg): no it's not eye-candy.

It's ok for some people used to the old interface to complain: they have to learn new ways of interacting, it's costly, but the designer's bet is that it will pay off in terms of efficiency at the end. ALL interfaces need users to learn before (hopefully) becoming efficient. Changing for changing will only oblige users to forget what they've learnt. But changing for more efficiency is valuable, and that's what Ribbon designers claimed they have done, and it seems the processus they have used to design the thing is good. I think you can't blame them for that.

A link about the story of the Ribbon: http://blogs.msdn.com/jensenh/archive/2008/03/12/the-story-of-the-ribbon.aspx

In summary:

word 1: 50- menu items Word 2003: 250+ (not counting toolbars, small property windows etc)
something has to be done
design took five years

Designers have:
Visited people at their workplace
Visited people in their home
Invited people into our labs for freeform working and discussion
amassed over 10,000 hours of video of people using Office, Over 3 billion data sessions collected from Office users ~2 million sessions per day
Over the last 90 days, theyâ(TM)ve tracked 352 million command bar clicks in Word
tracked nearly 6000 individual data points

Analysis:
Which commands do people use most?
How are commands commonly sequenced together?
Which commands are accessed via toolbar, mouse, keyboard?
Where do people fail to find functionality theyâ(TM)re asking for(in newsgroups, support calls,etc.)?

They also iterate a lot to find new solutions, and they evaluate the solutions until they were satisfying.

Comment: Re:Programming lesson (Score 1) 194

by stefski66 (#34443088) Attached to: <em>Pac-Man's</em> Ghost Behavior Algorithms

and of course, the supposedly better performances of men at 3D things has nothing to do with culture i.e. how did men/women learn to acquire this ability during childhood ?
"boy, go outside and play football" "girl, why don't you stay inside, and do some paintings instead" - this happens even in today's schools !

and of course, a statistically "significant result" (p.05) is always significant (67% vs 66,9% for example), and can be generalized to everyday activities such as parking a car. And parking a car has nothing to do with the behavior of men looking at you while you do so.

about humor vs discrimination: try replace "women"/"blond" by "jewish/black/arab", and see how your "humor" is impacting your humor-mates.

and the comparison with color-blindness is particularly bad: one knows that he is colorblind, and it's easy to detect. What you think about one woman's ability to drive a car is completely different, its "determinism", "I don't know about (this particular) her, but I generalize on suspicious beliefs, and I take for granted that she's bad at it".

Image

The "King of All Computer Mice" Finally Ships 207

Posted by samzenpus
from the there's-a-button-for-that dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The much-anticipated, much-mocked 18-button joystick mouse from WarMouse is now shipping. The press release features an impressive set of user quotes from game designer Chris Taylor, new SFWA president John Scalzi, and a doctor who runs a medical software company. Crazy or not, it's obviously more than just a gaming mouse."

Comment: Based on the past, my computer predicted... (Score 1) 979

by stefski66 (#31103118) Attached to: When Will AI Surpass Human Intelligence?

... that in 20 years AI researchers will still foresee major advances in their field in 20 years again, as a justification for politicians to invest in their research (and salary).
Unfortunately, high hopes dating from the seventies had generated much momentum in computer science academics...

Comment: air traffic control (Score 1) 276

by stefski66 (#30851086) Attached to: NASA Designs All-Electric Personal Flight Vehicle

I want it... as long as I'm the only one: imagine a large city full of people wanting to benefit from individual flight transportation. What a mess. That's why we have ATC.
And you know what ? we'll have flight routes, which will be overcrowded like ground road, and you will still be a 2h-commuter, just way farther in distance.

So no, it's not a commuting solution. However, I leave 1h30 from the sea, it can be cut to 15 min with this thing...

Cellphones

iPhone-Controlled Helicopter With AR Games 51

Posted by Soulskill
from the get-to-da-ichoppa dept.
andylim writes "Parrot has unveiled a remote-controlled helicopter that boasts augmented reality games. The helicopter is controlled using an iPhone or iPod Touch's accelerometer and touchscreen. There's a camera on the front of the helicopter, which you can use to navigate and to play augmented reality games, including a game that involves fighting a gigantic robot."

Comment: a few related works (Score 1) 528

by stefski66 (#30356670) Attached to: Will Tabbed Windows Be the Next Big Thing?

The debate 'overlapping vs tiling' is as old as window managers [1]... And novel interaction techniques have been explored in 2001, though we are far from the ideas presented in the second paper [2], check the video http://open-video.org/details.php?videoid=8280 ...

cheers.

[1] Myers, B. A. 1988. A Taxonomy of Window Manager User Interfaces. IEEE Comput. Graph. Appl. 8, 5 (Sep. 1988), 65-84. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/38.7762
A taxonomy for the user-visible parts of window managers is presented. It is noted that there are actually very few significant differences, and the differences can be classified in a taxonomy with fairly limited branching. This taxonomy should be useful in evaluating various window managers, and it will also serve as a guide for the issues that need to be addressed by designers if future window-manager user interfaces. The advantages and disadvantages of the various options are presented.

[2] Beaudouin-Lafon, M. 2001. Novel interaction techniques for overlapping windows. In Proceedings of the 14th Annual ACM Symposium on User interface Software and Technology (Orlando, Florida, November 11 - 14, 2001). UIST '01. ACM, New York, NY, 153-154. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/502348.502371
This note presents several techniques to improve window management with overlapping windows: tabbed windows, turning and peeling back windows, and snapping and zipping windows.
http://open-video.org/details.php?videoid=8280

Open Source

Linux Kernel 2.6.32 Released 195

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the download-compile-reboot-repeat dept.
diegocg writes "Linus Torvalds has officially released the version 2.6.32 of the Linux kernel. New features include virtualization memory de-duplication, a rewrite of the writeback code faster and more scalable, many important Btrfs improvements and speedups, ATI R600/R700 3D and KMS support and other graphic improvements, a CFQ low latency mode, tracing improvements including a 'perf timechart' tool that tries to be a better bootchart, soft limits in the memory controller, support for the S+Core architecture, support for Intel Moorestown and its new firmware interface, run-time power management support, and many other improvements and new drivers. See the full changelog for more details."

Comment: GUI design is not common sense (Score 3, Interesting) 1124

by stefski66 (#29527359) Attached to: Firefox To Replace Menus With Office Ribbon

disclaimer: I use a Mac, I've never used the Ribbon UI, and I'm an HCI professor. These two facts make me competent to talk about it.

In short: Microsoft (which I do not support usually) people has done a lot of work usability-wise (see the end of this msg): no it's not eye-candy.

It's ok for some people used to the old interface to complain: they have to learn new ways of interacting, it's costly, but the designer's bet is that it will pay off in terms of efficiency at the end. ALL interfaces need users to learn before (hopefully) becoming efficient. Changing for changing will only oblige users to forget what they've learnt. But changing for more efficiency is valuable, and that's what Ribbon designers claimed they have done, and it seems the processus they have used to design the thing is good. I think you can't blame them for that.

A link about the story of the Ribbon: http://blogs.msdn.com/jensenh/archive/2008/03/12/the-story-of-the-ribbon.aspx

In summary:

word 1: 50- menu items Word 2003: 250+ (not counting toolbars, small property windows etc)
something has to be done
design took five years

Designers have:
Visited people at their workplace
Visited people in their home
Invited people into our labs for freeform working and discussion
amassed over 10,000 hours of video of people using Office, Over 3 billion data sessions collected from Office users ~2 million sessions per day
Over the last 90 days, theyâ(TM)ve tracked 352 million command bar clicks in Word
tracked nearly 6000 individual data points

Analysis:
Which commands do people use most?
How are commands commonly sequenced together?
Which commands are accessed via toolbar, mouse, keyboard?
Where do people fail to find functionality theyâ(TM)re asking for(in newsgroups, support calls,etc.)?

They also iterate a lot to find new solutions, and they evaluate the solutions until they were satisfying.

Slowly and surely the unix crept up on the Nintendo user ...

Working...