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Submission + - BetaNet Sues Everyone for Remote SW Activation (

eldavojohn writes: Not to be out patent trolled by Eolas, a mystery company named 'BetaNet, LLC' is suing: Adobe Systems, Inc, Apple, Inc., Arial Software, LLC, Autodesk, Inc.,, CARBONITE, INC., Corel Corp., Eastman Kodak Co., International Business Machines Corp., Intuit, Inc., Microsoft Corp., McAfee, Inc., Oracle Corp., Rockwell Automation, Inc., Rosetta Stone, Inc., SAP America, Inc., Siemens Corp. and Sony Creative Software, Inc. for infringement of their patent entitled Secure system for activating personal computer software at remote locations. And of course, this was filed in our favoritest of favorite places: Marshall, TX (Texas Eastern District Court).

Submission + - Main Toilet on ISS Craps Out 4

The Narrative Fallacy writes: "NASA has spent years getting ready for a crowd in space — adding additional sleeping quarters, learning how to recycle liquid waste into drinking water, and installing a second bathroom last year but now BBC reports that the main toilet has broken down on the International Space Station while a record 13 astronauts are on board. For now Mission Control has advised the astronauts to hang an "out of service" sign on the toilet as it may take days to repair. In the meantime, Endeavour's seven astronauts will be restricted to the shuttle bathroom. Last year a Russian cosmonaut complained that he was no longer allowed to use the US toilet because of billing and cost issues but now the six space ISS residents will have to get in line to use the back-up toilet in the Russian part of the station. The pump separator on the malfunctioning toilet has apparently flooded and ESA astronaut Frank De Winne is the guy tasked with putting his plumbing skills to work on short notice. "We don't yet know the extent of the problem," says flight director Brian Smith, adding that the toilet troubles were "not going to be an issue" for now."

Submission + - WoW gamer earns Federal Investigation achievement.

barnyjr writes: A teenager could face federal charges after investigators say he made online threats to kill Americans on a plane from Indianapolis to Chicago. According to investigators, a monitor of the online interactive game World of Warcraft saw the alleged threats in an on-line chat and called Johnson County authorities. She told investigators the chatter didn't seem like a game. Full Story

Microsoft Won't Vouch For Linux 208

theodp writes "Gov. Christine Gregoire applauded Microsoft's job training partnership with WA state and county government agencies, which calls for the distribution of 30,625 training vouchers statewide during the next 90 days. 'This program [Elevate America] is all about equipping people with the new skills they'll need to get a job in the changing economy,' said Microsoft Counsel Brad Smith, who also made it very clear that getting 'workforce ready' won't involve acquiring any Linux skills. At least this offer appears to be no-cost, unlike the $35 Microsoft requested in an e-mail come-on for 'The Stimulus Package for Your Career' (so much for Smith's and Gregoire's war on spam)."

Dictionary For Kids Perplexed By Old Slang Screenshot-sm 3

A dictionary has been created to help kids who are all balled up trying to figure out what some dappers are saying in their bull sessions. The authors thought the idea of a dictionary of this sort was the bee's knees, and made another while they were at it so the old timers could understand the young birds too. Nigel Hare-Scot, big cheese at Home & Capital advisers, said: "There is a vast array of guides on youth street slang to assist older people in bridging the generational gap, but nothing on the market to aid teenagers understand the language of pensioners." I say he's all wet.

Submission + - Is Anti-Virus software dead?

An anonymous reader writes: After stumbling over several unanimous recommendations against using viral scans for your email (which somewhat shattered my security world view), I started to notice a bigger and bigger movement which argues against the use of anti-virus software altogether, as it is ineffective against the main threats of malware, counter-productive (as it eats up system resources), and seems to be more of a "good-luck charm" than anything else.

I have to admit that, even though I deal with loads of suspicious software, I can't even remember when I got the last real virus warning.

So — is it time to dump your anti-virus software, go "commando", and free yourself from the shackles of these system drags?

I like work; it fascinates me; I can sit and look at it for hours.