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The Military

Sixty Years On, B-52s Are Still Going Strong 403

Posted by samzenpus
from the staying-power dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Those who grew up in the 1960s and 1970s knew the B-52 Stratofortress as a central figure in the anxiety that flowed from the protracted staring match between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Now CNET reports that it was 60 years ago, on April 15, 1952, that a B-52 prototype built by Boeing took off on its maiden flight and although the 1950s-vintage B-52s are no longer in the US Air Force inventory, the 90 or so H models delivered between May 1961 and October 1962 still remain on active duty. 'The B-52 has been a wonderful flying box,' says retired Brig. Gen. Peyton Cole. 'It's persevered all these years because it's been able to adapt and still continues to fly. It started out as a high-level flying platform during the Cold War. Then as air defenses got better it became a low-level penetrator, and more than that was the first aircraft to fly low-level at night through FLIR (forward looking infrared) and night-vision TV.' The B-52's feat of longevity reflects both regular maintenance and timely upgrades — in the late 1980s, for instance, GPS capabilities were incorporated into the navigation system but it also speaks to the astronomical costs of the next-generation bombers that have followed the B-52 into service (a total of 744 were built, counting all models) with the Air Force. B-52s cost about $70 million apiece (in today's dollars), while the later, stealth-shaped B-2 Spirit bombers carried an 'eye-watering $3-billion-a-pop unit price.' The Air Force's 30-year forecast, published in March, envisions an enduring role for the B-52 and engineering studies, the Air Force says, suggest that the life span of the B-52 could extend beyond the year 2040. 'At that point, why not aim for the centennial mark?'"
Google

+ - Google's False Start reduces SSL latency by 30 %->

Submitted by
sridharo
sridharo writes "Google implemented SSL False Start in Chrome 9 that lead to a significant decrease in overall SSL connection setup times. SSL False Start reduces the latency of a SSL handshake by 30%.
Considering that more and more sites are turning to SSL ( Facebook and Twitter moved to SSL early this year ) , this move might benefit in making the web more secure."

Link to Original Source
Android

+ - Android security practices? 1

Submitted by Soft
Soft (266615) writes "Smartphone security recommendations seem to boil down to Windows-like practices: install an antivirus, run updates, and don't execute apps from untrusted sources. On my own computers, running Linux, I choose to only install (signed) packages from the distribution's or well-known repositories, or programs I can check and compile myself, or run them as a dedicated user--and I don't bother with an antivirus.

What rules should I adopt on my soon-to-be-bought Android device? Can I use it purely with open-source apps and still make the most of it? Are Android's fine-grained permissions (accessing the network, contacts...) reliable? Can apps be trusted not to scan your files and keyboard for passwords and emails? What precautions do security-conscious Slashdotters take to keep control of their phones?"
Robotics

+ - Amazing Lego drawing robot->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A gyroscope turns a Lego toy into a robot capable of drawing any Encapsulate Postscript (EPS) file. The robot localises itself using the gyroscope and wheel encoders. The system does not use any external reference."
Link to Original Source
NASA

+ - 'Superflares' Spotted in Crab Nebula by NASA->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Astronomers were shocked when the dusty remains of an exploded star, the Crab Nebula, unleashed a surprising blast of gamma rays, the highest-energy light in the Universe.

The outburst, which was similar to an enormous 'superflare' five times more powerful than any flare previously seen from the object, was first detected by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope on April 12 and lasted six days."

Link to Original Source
Facebook

Facebook Admits Hiring PR Firm To Smear Google 172

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the yeah-we-meant-to-do-that dept.
hasanabbas1987 writes "The clash of the Internet Giants reached new heights after a spokesman for Facebook confirmed to Daily Beast that Facebook paid a high level Public Relation firm to publish and spread stories against Google throughout the media to study various methods to examine the allegations that Google has been violating user privacy."
Google

Google Lobbies Nevada To Allow Self-Driving Cars 275

Posted by samzenpus
from the to-drive-or-not-to-drive dept.
b0bby writes "The NY Times reports that Google is quietly lobbying for legislation that would make Nevada the first state in which self-driving cars could be legally operated on public roads. 'The two bills, which have received little attention outside Nevada's capitol, are being introduced less than a year after the giant search engine company acknowledged that it was developing cars that could be safely driven without human intervention.'"
Google

+ - Sergey Brin: Windows is "torturing users"->

Submitted by
jbrodkin
jbrodkin writes "Google created Chrome OS because Windows is "torturing users," Google co-founder Sergey Brin says. Only about 20% of Google employees use Windows, with the rest on Mac and Linux, and Brin hopes that by next year nearly all Googlers will be using Chromebooks. "With Microsoft, and other operating system vendors, I think the complexity of managing your computer is really torturing users," Brin told reporters at Google I/O. "It's torturing everyone in this room. It's a flawed model fundamentally. Chromebooks are a new model that doesn't put the burden of managing the computer on yourself." Google claims 75% of business users could be moved from Windows computers to Chrome laptops."
Link to Original Source

Comment: s/w dev != manufacturing (Score 1) 460

by sridharo (#36092572) Attached to: Is Process Killing the Software Industry?
Processes are defined in the manufacturing industries to prevent slippage of 'achievable/defined' quality. Unfortunately the extension of processes from these industries (six sigma?) to software development doesnt reap the intended benefits.
Blame it on the guy who thought the role of a programmer and the line technician are the same!

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