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Comment: Re:DRM, the bane of progress and freedom (Score 0) 113

by sreekotay (#38502538) Attached to: Boxee 1.5 Will Be the Last Supported Desktop Version
That's correct (and easily verified by visiting those sites w/o either installed). Saying "DRM" is a bit like saying "audio" or "video" --- there's more than a bit of nuance that makes it painful for everyone. Often the pain isn't JUST technical --- it may be contractual (with the content owners) or cost (with the DRM provider). In general though, it is just pain.

Comment: Re:The lie is so easy to detect it shows the shill (Score 0) 364

by sreekotay (#36995618) Attached to: Finding Fault With the Low, Low Price of Android

This is a shill article because the lie is so fucking obvious to detect. First of all, Android is made by the Open Handset Alliance. Google is of course a very major player in it same as Nokia was a major player in Symbian BUT it is called an alliance for a reason. Google doesn't work on it alone.

So basically Google and a LOT of other players pooled their resources to create a product they could all benefit from and made it available for "free". So? MS used its monopoly resources to create a product nobody else can use for free. Apple used it fast wealth to create a product nobody else can use or even create gadgets for without paying them and they often just refuse to license stuff.

Who is being the bad guy again? Oh of course, Google for being less evil. What people forget about Googles "Don't be evil" slogan is that doesn't say "Be good" it just means don't be as evil as the rest... and in American Business, that is a pretty low standard.

While the parallels between MS of the 90's and Google are exxxxtremely thin --- it works only if you squint REAAAALLLY hard and use a sarcastic dismissive voice :) --- its not a huge stretch to say that Google, and Google alone, controls the features, look&feel, and direction of Android, leveraging close source applications through which they acquire customers, usage, and derive monetization. From Ars Technica, "In fact, development of the Android private branch and the roadmap is controlled by Google, with little input from external parties or the Open Handset Alliance members" http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2011/08/study-android-is-least-open-of-open-source-mobile-platforms.ars And from Droid Life: "Google has really started to enforce 'non-fragmentation clauses', giving the Android team the final say on how much can be tweaked on their stock code" http://www.droid-life.com/2011/03/31/google-tightens-the-android-reigns-time-to-start-controlling-fragmentation/ This enforcement, allegedly, is through access to the very valuable closed-source Google suite of applications -- without which the Android device doesn't do much more than boot. See http://www.gomonews.com/the-android-vs-cyanogen-story-has-google-shot-itself-in-the-foot-by-shooting-down-developer/ That said, no question that its been good (to date) for consumers - it just seems like the contrast between the public stance of Android and the behind-the-scenes shenanigans is... interesting.

Image

Genghis Khan, History's Greenest Conqueror 279

Posted by samzenpus
from the taking-the-good-with-the-bad dept.
New research suggests that in addition to being one of history's cruelest conquerors, Genghis Khan may have been the greenest. It is estimated that the Mongol leader's invasions unintentionally scrubbed almost 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. From the article: "Over the course of the century and a half run of the Mongol Empire, about 22 percent of the world's total land area had been conquered and an estimated 40 million people were slaughtered by the horse-driven, bow-wielding hordes. Depopulation over such a large swathe of land meant that countless numbers of cultivated fields eventually returned to forests. In other words, one effect of Genghis Khan's unrelenting invasion was widespread reforestation, and the re-growth of those forests meant that more carbon could be absorbed from the atmosphere." I guess everyone has their good points.
Government

China's Influence Widens Nobel Peace Prize Boycott 360

Posted by timothy
from the friends-of-un-friends dept.
c0lo writes "Not only did China decline to attend the upcoming Nobel peace prize ceremony, but urged diplomats in Oslo to stay away from the event warning of 'consequences' if they go. Possibly as a result of this (or on their own decisions), 18 other countries turned down the invitation: Pakistan, Iran, Sudan, Russia, Kazakhstan, Colombia, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Iraq, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Venezuela, the Philippines, Egypt, Ukraine, Cuba and Morocco. Reuters seems to think the 'consequences' are of an economic nature, pointing out that half of the countries with economies that gained global influence during recent times are boycotting the ceremony (with Brazil and India still attending)."
Image

The World's Smallest Legible Font 280

Posted by samzenpus
from the because-he-can dept.
hasanabbas1987 writes "From the article: 'Well 'technically' they aren't the smallest fonts in the world as if they were you wouldn't be able to read even a single letter, but, you should be able to read the entire paragraph in the picture given above... we did. A Computer science professor called Ken Perlin designed these tiny fonts and you can fit 500 reasonable words in a resolution of 320 x 240 space. There are at the moment the smallest legible fonts in the world.'"
Google

Google Engineer Sponsors New Kinect Bounties 96

Posted by Soulskill
from the dead-or-alive dept.
ashidosan writes "Hot on the heels of the Adafruit competition, Matt Cutts (a search spam engineer at Google) is sponsoring two more $1,000 bounties for projects using Kinect. 'The first $1,000 prize goes to the person or team that writes the coolest open-source app, demo, or program using the Kinect. The second prize goes to the person or team that does the most to make it easy to write programs that use the Kinect on Linux.'" Relatedly, reader imamac points out a video showing Kinect operating on OS X.

Comment: Re:What about license? (Score 3, Informative) 172

by sreekotay (#32979070) Attached to: Lightspark 0.4.2 Open Source Flash Player Released
That was historically true, but is no longer the case (I believe they changed the license coincident with the Open Screen Project release). See here. There are still the H.264 and On2 (as well as Nellymoser and other specific media codec) issues, but not any with open implementations of Flash itself.

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