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+ - From the electrophone to Beats: Interactive History of the Headphone-> 3

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Did you know that the first headphone was invented back in the 1890s? Since then, headphones have evolved and developed into the personal audio devices we all use today.

Headphone maker Ligo has put together an interactive guide to the 120-year history of the headphone, complete with period-correct background music for each decade. Plug in your own headphones and take trip through the history of tuning out everyone around you."

Link to Original Source

+ - Gene Therapy Converts Heart Cells Into "Biological Pacemakers"->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "Pacemakers serve an invaluable purpose, by electrically stimulating a recipient's heart in order to keep it beating at a steady rate. The implantation of a pacemaker is a major surgical procedure, however, plus its presence in the body can lead to complications such as infections. Now, for the first time, scientists have instead injected genes into the defective hearts of pigs, converting unspecialized heart cells into "biological pacemakers.""
Link to Original Source

+ - Dell's Chromebook sales go crazy, so company halts sales->

Submitted by mpicpp
mpicpp (3454017) writes "Dell’s only Chromebook is at least temporarily unavailable for online purchase through the company’s website, only seven months after the model started shipping.

Facing rising commercial demand for the devices, Dell has not been able to keep up with orders.

The Chromebook 11, which shipped in December, is listed as unavailable on Dell’s Chromebook website, and the company is asking potential buyers to call in orders.

“Due to strong demand, the Dell Chromebook 11 is currently not available for order on Dell.com. It continues to be available for our education customers and can be ordered through their sales representative,” said Ellen Murphy, a Dell spokeswoman, in an email.

The laptop will eventually come online again, though the company did not provide a specific date.

With Dell keeping Chromebook purchases open mainly to commercial customers, individual buyers may have to turn to competitive products from Samsung, Toshiba, Lenovo and Hewlett-Packard, which are available online starting at under $200."

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+ - Google Kills Quickoffice->

Submitted by sqorbit
sqorbit (3387991) writes ""With the integration of Quickoffice into the Google Docs, Sheets and Slides apps, the Quickoffice app will be unpublished from Google Play and the App Store in the coming weeks,". It seems Google is cleaning house lately."
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Comment: Fanboys.. (Score 1) 192

by sqorbit (#47265735) Attached to: Amazon Announces 'Fire Phone'
The Kindle Fire seems to have fans just like Apple. While not nearly coming close to Apple fans numbers they are just as set in their ways. It will sell to those fans. The media/books/apps they suck down from the Amazon store and the shopping they do with Prime it should do well enough to stick around as a niche product.

+ - Spotify announces single user hacked, no personal data stolen.

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Announced on the company blog, CTO Oskar Stål apologized to users that there has been a security breach at Spotify, where some systems and internal company data was accessed without permission. Evidence given suggests only one Spotify user's account was accessed and that no security or payment information was taken. As a security step, Spotify have announced they are releasing an updated android application over the coming days as well as requiring some user's to re-enter their login details."

+ - Hacker 'Sabu' gets lenient sentence after helping US->

Submitted by k280
k280 (2593657) writes "A convicted hacker-turned-informant, who was facing in excess of 20 years in prison, has been handed a sentence of a year's supervision.

Hector Xavier Monsegur — known as "Sabu" — was arrested in 2011 on hacking charges.

He had faced a lengthy term, but instead agreed to work with US authorities to identify other hacking suspects.

The FBI said Monsegur had stopped more than 300 hacking attacks.

In a New York court, a judge sentenced him to seven months — which he has already served — and a year's supervision."

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+ - Apps on your Android phone can take photos without you knowing 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A researcher has demonstrated that it's possible for malicious attackers to create an Android app that will surreptitiously take pictures and upload them to a remote server without the user being aware of or noticing it. There are many apps on Play Store that aim at taking pictures without any visual indication but all of them require app activity to be visible and phone screen to be on. But he managed to create an app that does so without displaying any notification, without the presence of the app being visible (i.e. on the list of installed applications), and even without the screen being on."

+ - 50 Years (And Then Some) Of Computer Science At MIT->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "In 1964, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology launched Project Mathematics and Computation, the forerunner of its modern Computer Science department. But even before then, MIT researchers had chalked up several milestones in the embryonic field, from the invention of core memory to the first shooter video game. All in all, MIT faculty, students, and graduates have shaped the world of high tech as we know it, laying the foundation for the Internet and many of the programs we use on a daily basis today."
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+ - The Unintended Consequences of DRM

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The security and privacy concerns obfuscated by DRM aren't always apparent. Simon St. Laurent talks DRM, Privacy, and DRM creeping into the physical world: "Terrified by the sudden collapse in the cost of duplication and distribution, locking everyone’s shelves down seems like the only way to maintain their balance (sheets). Worse, products from beyond publishing are appearing with the new key-management practices built in, including cars, coffee, and of course printer cartridges.""

+ - 404-No-More project seeks to rid the Web of '404 not found' pages->

Submitted by blottsie
blottsie (3618811) writes "A new project proposes an do away with dead 404 errors by implementing new HTML code that will help access prior versions of hyperlinked content. With any luck, that means that you’ll never have to run into a dead link again. ...

The new feature would come in the form of introducing the mset attribute to the element in HTML, which would allow users of the code to specify multiple dates and copies of content as an external resource."

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+ - Heartbleed Disclosure Timeline Revealed 1

Submitted by bennyboy64
bennyboy64 (1437419) writes "Ever since the Heartbleed flaw in OpenSSL was made public there have been various questions about who knew what and when. The Sydney Morning Herald has done some analysis of public mailing lists and talked to those involved with disclosing the bug to get the bottom of it. The newspaper finds that Google discovered Heartbleed on or before March 21 and notified OpenSSL on April 1. Other key dates include Finnish security testing firm Codenomicon discovering the flaw independently of Google at 23:30 PDT, April 2. SuSE, Debian, FreeBSD and AltLinux all got a heads up from Red Hat about the flaw in the early hours of April 7 — a few hours before it was made public. Ubuntu, Gentoo and Chromium attempted to get a heads up by responding to an email with few details about it but didn't get a heads up, as the guy at Red Hat sending the disclosure messages out in India went to bed. By the time he woke up, Codenomicon had reported the bug to OpenSSL and they freaked out and decided to tell the world about it."

Gee, Toto, I don't think we're in Kansas anymore.

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