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Comment: Re:Just remove Flash from office machines (Score 1) 125

by spcebar (#42840869) Attached to: Adobe Hopes Pop-up Warnings Will Stop Office-Borne Flash Attacks

There's absolutely no reason to have Flash installed on machines in an office.

Slow down there, that's not really fair. Considering that not all offices in the world perform the same work, generalizing that Flash is of no use in any office is sort of counter productive. Flash may be losing its ubiquity, but I can still think of a number of practical uses that aren't cat videos and games.

Comment: Re:Google should then provide signed certs (Score 2) 299

I don't think anyone's arguing that you should have to pay for a service that costs money to provide- I think we're just miffed that a service that worked and was free has been altered so that it can be no longer. I think anyone would be willing to pay for a service that costs money to provide (and a lot of us geeks do, i.e, linux is free but support costs money), but when it comes down to it, A. Google isn't exactly strapped for cash, and B. As IBitOBear suggested, the cost is trivial, and Google really ought to offer an alternative means to comply without paying a third party. But that's just my two cents, take it or leave it.
Science

+ - What if reality was really just a 'Sims universe?-> 3

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Physicists propose experiment to test hypothesis that reality is just a computer simulation.

Originally published:
Dec 14 2012 — 5:00pm

By:
Joel N. Shurkin, ISNS Contributor

(ISNS) — What if everything — all of us, the world, the universe — was not real? What if everything we are, know and do was really just someone's computer simulation?
The notion that our reality was some kid on a couch in the far future playing with a computer game like a gigantic Sim City, or Civilization, and we are his characters, isn't new. But a group of physicists now thinks they know of a way to test the concept. Three of them propose to test reality by simulating the simulators.

Martin Savage, professor of physics at the University of Washington, Zohreh Davoudi, one of his graduate students, and Silas Beane of the University of New Hampshire, would like to see whether they can find traces of simulation in cosmic rays. The work was uploaded in arXiv, an online archive for drafts of academic research papers.

The notion that reality is something other than we think it is goes far back in philosophy, including Plato and his Parable of the Cave, which claimed reality was merely shadows of real objects on a cave wall. Sixteenth-century philosopher-mathematician René Descartes thought he proved reality with his famous "I think, therefore, I am," which proposed that he was real and his thoughts had a reality.

Then, in 2003, a British philosopher, Nick Bostrom of the University of Oxford, published a paper that had the philosophy and computer science departments buzzing.

Bostrom suggested three possibilities: "The chances that a species at our current level of development can avoid going extinct before becoming technologically mature is negligibly small," "almost no technologically mature civilizations are interested in running computer simulations of minds like ours,” or we are "almost certainly" a simulation.

All three could be equally possible, he wrote, but if the first two are false, the third must be true. "There will be a"

Link to Original Source
AMD

+ - AMD Unveils Preliminary Radeon HD 8000M Series Mobile GPU Details->

Submitted by
MojoKid
MojoKid writes "AMD has just released some preliminary information regarding the company’s upcoming Radeon HD 8000M series of mobile GPUs. Based on the naming convention alone, it may obvious that the Radeon HD 8000M series is AMD’s second generation of products featuring the GCN (Graphics Core Next) architecture, which debuted in the Radeon HD 7000 series. Like its predecessors, the Radeon HD 8000M series targets gamers with full DirectX 11.1 support and improved gaming performance over the previous-gen, but the architecture also lends itself to GPU compute applications as well. The Radeon HD 8500M sports 384 Stream Processors with an Engine Clock up to 650MHz. Memory clocks will vary based on the use of GDDR3 or GDDR5 memory. The Radeon HD 8600M is essentially the same, but with a slightly higher Engine Clock up to 775MHz. The Radeon HD 8700M is also based on the same GPU, but will be clocked at up to 850MHz, for a further increase in performance over the 8600M. The Radeon HD 8800M series, however, is based on a larger, more powerful chip and will sport 640 Stream Processors with an engine clock of up to 700MHz. GDDR5 memory will be used exclusively with 8800M, at speeds up to 1125MHz. It will be interesting to see how these new GPUs stack up versus NVIDIA's latest GeForce 600M series of mobile chips."
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AT&T

+ - AT&T Extols Telecom Monopoly In Groovy 1970 Video->

Submitted by
jfruh
jfruh writes "For many Slashdotters, the day in 1984 when the AT&T telecommunications monopoly was broken by court order is at best a hazy childhood memory, and they can't remember a time when the telephones in your house weren't your property. A Ma Bell propoganda video from 1970 was an early salvo in the fight to end that monopoly. With groovy, Sgt. Pepper-style graphics, AT&T explained why owning your own phone could damange phone service for everybody; why early experiments in competition were unfair (they were skimming off cheaper customers and leaving AT&T with the legal responsibility of connecting less profitable rural users); and why subsidizing high-quality phone service for everyone ought to be seen as a public good."
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Science

+ - Single Microbe May Have Triggered World's Largest Mass Extinction-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "About 251 million years ago, 90 percent of the Earth's species became extinct. The mass extinction, called the "Great Dying" or the more scientific-sounding Permian-Triassic extinction event, made 96 percent of marine animals and 70 percent of land-dwelling animals extinct in just a few thousand years, and it took the earth as much as 10 million years to regain the biodiversity that it had lost. Researchers believe that they may finally know why the event occurred, but the theory is not without controversy.
There are several theories, including the possibility of a meterorite hitting the planet. Previously, most researchers believed that the Permian mass extinction was a result of a series of volcanic eruptions in what is now Siberia. These eruptions would have caused a dramatic rise in the amount of greenhouse gases which would have, in turn, killed off a bulk of species.
However, Daniel Rothman from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is floating around a different theory. As he presented in a meeting for the American Geophysical Union, he believes that the mass extinction could have been caused by something much smaller. His theory is that the extinction was caused by a single strain of bacteria."

Link to Original Source
Earth

+ - Ticking Arctic Carbon Bomb May Be Bigger Than Thought-> 2

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Scientists are expressing fresh concerns about the carbon locked in the Arctic's vast expanse of frozen soil. New field studies quantify the amount of soil carbon at 1.9 trillion metric tons, suggesting that previous estimates underestimated the climate risk if this carbon is liberated. Meanwhile, a new analysis of laboratory experiments that simulate carbon release by thawed soil is bolstering worries that continued carbon emissions could unleash a massive Arctic carbon wallop."
Link to Original Source

The bogosity meter just pegged.

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