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Comment: [off topic] he should not have a patent (Score 1) 267

by sorin25 (#42947297) Attached to: Do Patent Laws Really Protect Small Inventors?

I've seen this guy a few years back on Discovery Channel and I laughed my ass off.

"an invention is unpatentable if it would have been obvious to a person having ordinary skill in the art"

Anyone with minimal knowledge in mechanics and electronics can think about a radio powered by a hand crank. No one has had the nerve to patent it because it's OBVIOUS it can be done, and there is no RESEARCH needed, and also there IS NO MARKET for it.

I have inherited a torch with a hand crank made in USSR from my grandfather and he died in 1984 .. and the god dam thing was old
I've seen a radio that was powered by thermocouples placed on a gas lamp (and it was a commercial product)

So there were other people to try to power small devices from something else than a battery.

His only "merit" is that he "found" the market in African countries. In my opinion he is just a patent troll who wasn't able to make it.

 

Comment: Re:older developers... (Score 1) 742

by sorin25 (#31890046) Attached to: Why Linux Is Not Attracting Young Developers

> Maybe it's because there are basically ZERO jobs in most places for real hard-core CS.

A real hard-core CS would be able to do the jobs that are available faster and better ...

Engineering is an art, and the colleges should promote people with talent for that art. Code monkeys do not need a college degree, they can survive with a 3 month introductory course in whatever programming language they need ...

Comment: Welcome to the real world (Score 1) 709

by sorin25 (#30674268) Attached to: Office Work Ethic In the IT Industry?
I while back I was thinking about this, in terms of selling time .. versus selling work. Some of the people I work seem to regard employment as selling time, they come to work, sit on their ass for 8 hours and expect to get payed .. on the other hand, I usually get complaints because I finish what I have to do early and want to leave .. Mostly this is the management fault, because they fail to recognize the difference between being there ... versus working there.

Comment: Re:Didn't Japan just come out ... (Score 1) 550

by sorin25 (#29278511) Attached to: Japan Plans $21B Space Power Plant

Actually canned foods are far easier to target accurately and throw at high velocity. I'll take canned good vs gold bricks at 50 feet any day. The guy with the can opener doesn't stand a chance against either of us.

nobody trows food ... especially when there is nothing else to eat around there .. or if he trows it .. then the gold bricks still win ;)

Comment: Re:To be more specific (Score 4, Insightful) 673

by CannonballHead (#29205175) Attached to: Fear of Porn URL Exposure Discourages Firefox 3 Upgrade

Oh stop with the morals and ethics stuff. I should be able to do whatever I want to do, regardless of what I promised or said I'd do or what is good for my relationships with other people or what is good for other people. And, by the way, all this corporate and political corruption is really getting on my nerves, why can't they be good, ethical, moral, scientific, non-hypocritical promise-keeping citizens like me?

[/sarcasm]

Comment: Bonus (Score 1) 395

by whisper_jeff (#29202667) Attached to: Company Laptop, My Data — Can They Co-exist?
Ask for the "reimbursement" to be made in the form of a bonus so it's clear who owns the laptop - what you do with your bonus is your business. Yes, you'll have to pay taxes on it (I assume your tax laws count a bonus as income) but that's cheaper than the full price of the laptop and now it's yours, without question.

So long as there's 1) no contract to spell things out clearly and 2) the computer is "theirs", there will always be the risk of someone claiming the data on it is owned by them, not you. You may have an amazing relationship with your current boss but that situation may change (new boss, turn-for-the-worse in your relationship, whatever). If there's a contract in place, fine, but I suspect you're hesitant to ask that a contract be drawn up for just this situation.

Thus, if the company is willing to fork over the money, have them fork it over in a way that does not link it to the computer.

Or, of course, pay for it yourself. You obviously thought it was worth it given that you already bought it. Yes, an extra grand in your pocket is nice but you already decided you were willing to part with the money so if ownership of the data is important then you're not really out anything - it was an expense you were willing to pay.

Comment: Re:The Problem with New CS/IT Grads (Score 1) 328

by sorin25 (#27234295) Attached to: Computer Science Major Is Cool Again

You have a point, but even if a doctor doesn't know how exactly to perform brain surgery he is certainly able to describe the steps involved. I'm not against specialization, I'm against having a narrow view of your specialization.

As for the cost of learning C or any other language, the more languages you are familiar with, the easier is to learn a new one. The principles are the same ..

Comment: Re:The Problem with New CS/IT Grads (Score 1) 328

by sorin25 (#27233413) Attached to: Computer Science Major Is Cool Again
And who will write the Java interpretor for the next generation of processors ? Knowledge is power, knowing how the instructions look to the processor is helpful in many situations, being able to read 20 year old C code to implement something similar is also useful. You don't have to write in C or Assembly to make good use of that knowledge.

"Indecision is the basis of flexibility" -- button at a Science Fiction convention.

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