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Comment: Re:uh, no? (Score 0) 340

by sonamchauhan (#48395555) Attached to: Alleged Satellite Photo Says Ukraine Shootdown of MH17

Its likely Russia-allied militia (not Russia) which brought MH17 down, because of two points:

1. As someone else wrote. "Pro russian/rusian forces used BUKs to shot down three other Ukrainian planes days before the MH17"...
2. Days previous, an entire air defense regiment, and its missiles, defected (the rebels apparently crowed about this on Twitter days prior to the attack).

But knowing about both points, Ukrainian ATC in Kiev cleared civilian aircraft to transit through the same airspace. This is either callous incompetence combined with greed (for airspace transit fees), or something worse. A fair enquiry should establish this.

Comment: Ãs Free Career Advice/Pet Theory (Score 1) 127

by sonamchauhan (#47684179) Attached to: Switching Game Engines Halfway Through Development

Principle 1. Create something you own

Spend time and energy making something that: (1) you own fully (2) is of value to others (3) you can exchange for value
This is because you can only ever give what you own. Examples: a mobile app, personal skills, bookshelf. Even raising poultry/vegetables in your backyard counts - you exchange these with yourself for money (a.k.a. 'saving cash').

Note, 'Writing code for cash' fails on point (1), but 'Honing C++ skills' ticks all three points. A life devoted tohelping others is the best deal of all - you exchange your life for treasure in heaven.

Principle 2. If you cannot work for yourself, search for a workplace like how long term investors search for stock.

Consider the most famous one of them all - Warren Buffet. He uses 'intrinsic value' to value stock. Companies with price to intrinsic value ratio (lets call it 'P/V' for this post) lower than 1 are more likely well-managed but undervalued -- and hungry to be valued higher -- so Warren 'buys' those companies.

My pet theory: unlike Warren, you want to 'buy into' workplaces that are consistently profitable and whose P/V ratio is as close to 1 as possible. This is because such companies are typically profitable, well run and will treat you fairly -- leaving you enough time and energy for Principle 1.

Let take a look at Netflix (NFLX) -- a well regarded company with a demanding work environment -- their ratio 1.85
  http://www.gurufocus.com/term/...
(To check others, replace 'NFLX' in the URL with another stock ticker - remember, its the median ratio we're looking for)

NFLX (1.8) , AMZN (4), and EA (2.5) for instance, have high 'stock price/intrinsic value' ratios. So, while these are very successful companies, these are more likely high-pressure work environments with little time to yourself outside of work. Even GOOG (1.6) and APPL (1.5) are getting a bit up there.

Going lower: SPLS (1.3), MSFT, WMT (Walmart), BA (Boeing) (all 1.2), and INTL (1.1).

Now the magic unity figure -- BRK.A (Warren's Berkshire Hathaway itself), BAC (Bank of America), PFE (Pfizer) - all around 1. Strangely, so is ODP (Office Depot - 0.97).

Further down seems to be the domain of banks -- FNF (Fidelity National -- 0.9), PRU (Prudential - 0.28), MS (Morgan Stanley - 0.26), JPM (JP Morgan - 0.27)

Comment: Re:It's tinfoil time! (Score 2) 232

by sonamchauhan (#47668355) Attached to: Fugitive Child Sex Abuser Caught By Face-Recognition Technology

Correct - lets hamstring the police. Information technology, image recognition, automation, are only permissible for use by mobsters, etc.

*Private* data should not be accessible without a warrant. Image recognition on data already presented to the government (a passport photo in this case) is perfectly permissible.

+ - CPAN as a webservice?

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Consider some very large software archive/library — e.g. http://openjsan.org/ (Javascript), http://rubygems.org/ (Ruby), http://cpan.org/ (Perl), http://mvnrepository.com/ (Java), http://pypi.python.org/ (Python), http://github.org/ (various). Lets say you want to automatically generate wrappers that enable remote subroutine invocation (say, some sort of web service call) for the majority of software in this library. What language would you target? Where would you start?

The aim here is a baby step towards language-agnostic reuse of code developed over decades at great collective effort.

My thoughts so far: the only code suitable for exposure are functions and methods that accept and return basic types (int, char, string) — or data structures or objects made up purely of basic types. Introspection/reflection capabilities in a language — including the ability to examine method signatures — are important. Languages like Perl (whose subroutine parameters passed in the @_ array, but without formal subroutine signatures) are a bit of a puzzle."

Two is not equal to three, even for large values of two.

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