Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Arch Linux: what's the differentiating factor? (Score 4, Informative) 103

by some_guy_88 (#38725292) Attached to: Package Signing Comes To Pacman and Arch Linux

My favourite Arch feature is the AUR (Arch User Repository) where anyone can submit their own packages which other uses can then install.

Because of the AUR, Arch is more likely to have a package for some given obscure application that Debian would be missing. Also, these packages are kept up to date to a greater extent than you'll see on Debian. Finally they're all in one place where as you don't have to constantly add repositories to your package manager's repo list.

Comment: Re:Seems people are intentionally missing the poin (Score 2) 79

by some_guy_88 (#36815318) Attached to: Dumpster Drive: File-Sharing For Your Digital Trash

For instance, on installation, you tell it to only send mp3s, or pdfs to the dumpster drive, and even then, you have to go in and OK the individual files so you don't accidentally delete and upload your tax return.

It is an alternative to your normal trash, not a replacement. You have to explicitly drag a file in there that you wish to be deleted and shared.

Comment: Re:Mobile devices (Score 2) 175

by some_guy_88 (#36577118) Attached to: KDE 4.7 RC Is Here: GRUB2 Integration, KWin Mobile

I'd rather have a good desktop environment than yet another project parasitized by the mobile trends

Yeah I get that, but IMO a single framework that I can learn (Qt/kde) that allows me to build desktop and mobile apps is quite compelling. And qt is a good framework. It's some of the best competition out there for .NET so I want to see it succeed.

Also, recently, kde4 has become a good desktop environment. It has come a long way and is completely usable in it's current form.. assuming of course that you ignore the utter bullshit which is nepomuk and striggi.. :)

Comment: Re:How To Tweak GNOME 3 (Score 1) 353

by some_guy_88 (#35745906) Attached to: GNOME 3 Released

I haven't had much experience with macs either but as I understand it, on a mac, you have one "Application" active at one time. The active application controls the menu bar up the top of the screen. A keyboard shortcut exists which cycles the windows that belong to this application. Another keyboard shortcut exists that cycles the currently active application.

Also if you close all of an application's windows, you haven't actually closed the application. It's still running. The menubar will still show the application's menu and usually allow you to launch new windows.

The end result is that multi-monitor window management becomes a bit tricky because of the menubar thing and workspaces are slightly broken because the idea of grouping your windows by activity is lost as you are forced to group them by application. In Gnome/KDE etc, it doesn't matter what application created the window, you can group it with anything else by putting it on a workspace of it's own. I don't actually recall specifically what goes wrong when you try to work like this on a mac. I only recall that it's problematic.

I don't actually own a mac so I could be wrong about any of the above.

All the evidence concerning the universe has not yet been collected, so there's still hope.

Working...