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Submission + - Twitter provides Boston police and Suffolk prosecutors with subscriber info (

lmw94002 writes: Anonymous speech is free. But free speech is not necessarily anonymous. "Social media giant Twitter has handed over subscriber information for some Twitter accounts indirectly tied to the Occupy Boston protest, ending a court battle fought behind closed doors as Boston law enforcement investigated hacking attacks on the Boston police and a police union."

Submission + - Faster-Than-Light Neutrino Update: Still Hope for Warp-Drive Fans? (

sciencehabit writes: The CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva has confirmed Wednesday's report that a loose fiber-optic cable may be behind measurements that seemed to show neutrinos outpacing the speed of light. But the lab also says another glitch could have caused the experiment to underestimate the particles' speed. The other effect concerns an oscillator that gives its readings time stamps synchronized to GPS signals. Researchers think correcting for an error in this device would actually increase the anomaly in neutrino velocity, making the particles even speedier than the earlier measurements seemed to show.

Submission + - Cosmic Buckyball Particle 'Factory' Discovered ( 1

astroengine writes: "For the first time, "buckyballs" have been discovered in the cosmos in a solid form. Until now, the only evidence in space for the bizarre little hollow balls of carbon atoms have been in interstellar gases, but with the help of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered buckyballs accumulating and stacking atop one another to form solid particles. "These buckyballs are stacked together to form a solid, like oranges in a crate," said Nye Evans of Keele University in England, lead author of a paper appearing in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. "The particles we detected are minuscule, far smaller than the width of a hair, but each one would contain stacks of millions of buckyballs.""

Submission + - Microsoft's Anti-Google Propaganda Campaign ( 1

eldavojohn writes: As the presidential race heats up, the smear ads on TV are also increasing. But Microsoft isn't going to site idly by and let the politicians engage in all that song and dance — and Microsoft really does employ both song and dance. Their Youtube channel appears to be slowly transforming from trade show videos and launches into a marketing attack or propaganda campaign that only targets Google (both videos I've watched seemed to have nothing positive about Microsoft in them). Under a month ago, they launched a spoof called GMail man, a creepy guy that flips through all your GMail and serves up super personal ads that are wrong (although they never say if Hotmail engages in targeted marketing). And a few days ago Googlighting shows up to spread fear and uncertainty about Google Docs. Most amusing to this viewer was that I found no such trace of 'Googlighting' on Bing's video service.

Submission + - Node.js Tools: Server-side JavaScript Comes of Age (

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Peter Wayner provides a comprehensive overview of the Node.js-inspired development environments and cloud platforms that are rapidly remaking the Web application stack. 'The scruffy, junkyard quality of the Node realm is rapidly disappearing as programmers build extras for Node as quickly as Node itself was born. Now Node is more of an ecosystem, with its own conference and a collection of tools that orbit around it. There are IDEs, deployment tools, and companies looking to offer Node hosting as a service. All are helping to transform Node from science experiment to real contributor in the data center and the cloud.' Wayner writes. 'These tools aren't luxury goods yet. They're largely the first builds, which means there are rough spots and glitches. They are typically small, simple, and far from full-featured solutions, but they're also a chance for the Node users to rethink what did and didn't work with the previous generation of Web tools. Node is addressing some of the problems people have found with the traditional stack and fixing them"

Submission + - Mcafee Report says Mobile Malware on the rise (

EliSowash writes: "Mcafee reports that mobile malware hit more than 400 unique samples in Q4 2011, nearly quadrupuling the previous quarter, and total unique malware samples topped 75 million. According to Adam Wosotowsky , senior anti-spam analyst and author of the report, malware authors are changing their tactics. "They are moving to a persistent model, where they are trying to get into corporations and steal intellectual property, more money, and to maintain the infection for a long period of time." Cybercrime and hacktivism were also notable in the last quarter of 2011, particularly the activities of Anonymous, LulzSec, and Sabu. The full report is available here (PDF)."

Submission + - China computer maker seeks iPad sale ban in Shanghai... ( 1

K7DAN writes: "Apple's battle defending the Ipad trademark in China is taking place in Shanghai. Proview Technology out of Shenzhen, China (a Taiwan affiliated company) claims that it registered the Ipad name in 2000 and the international patent secured by Apple was not properly secured in China. Analysts believe Apple will likely settle the dispute out of court. Chinese courts are notorious for ruling in favor of local companies no matter how strong the case presented by foreigners."

Submission + - Adobe to Abandon Flash Player on Linux ( 1

ekimd writes: Adobe has anounced their plans to abandon future updates of their Flash player for Linux. Partnering with Google, after the release of 11.2, "the Flash Player browser plugin for Linux will only be available via the 'Pepper' API as part of the Google Chrome browser distribution and will no longer be available as a direct download from Adobe." Viva la HTML 5!
The Internet

Submission + - UN pushes plan to regulate the Internet, makes SOPA look like a paper cut (

no0b writes: On Feb. 27, a diplomatic process will begin in Geneva that could result in a new treaty giving the United Nations unprecedented powers over the Internet. Dozens of countries, including Russia and China, are pushing hard to reach this goal by year's end. As Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said last June, his goal and that of his allies is to establish "international control over the Internet" through the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), a treaty-based organization under U.N. auspices.
" Subsume under intergovernmental control many functions of the Internet Engineering Task Force, the Internet Society and other multi-stakeholder groups that establish the engineering and technical standards that allow the Internet to work;"


Submission + - Aging Eyes Blamed for Seniors' Health Woes

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Scientists have looked for explanations as to why certain conditions occur with age, among them memory loss, slower reaction time, insomnia and even depression looking at such suspects as high cholesterol, obesity, heart disease and an inactive lifestyle. Now Laurie Tarkan writes that as eyes age, less and less sunlight gets through the lens to reach key cells in the retina that regulate the body’s circadian rhythm, its internal clock that rallies the body to tackle the day’s demands in the morning and slows it down at night, allowing the body to rest and repair. “Evolution has built this beautiful timekeeping mechanism, but the clock is not absolutely perfect and needs to be nudged every day,” says Dr. David Berson, whose lab at Brown University studies how the eye communicates with the brain. Dr. Patricia Turner, an ophthalmologist who with her husband, Dr. Martin Mainster has written extensively about the effects of the aging eye on health, estimate that by age 45, the photoreceptors of the average adult receive just 50 percent of the light needed to fully stimulate the circadian system, by age 55, it dips to 37 percent, and by age 75, to a mere 17 percent and recommend that people should make an effort to expose themselves to bright sunlight or bright indoor lighting when they cannot get outdoors and have installed skylights and extra fluorescent lights in their own offices to help offset the aging of their own eyes. “In modern society, most of the time we live in a controlled environment under artificial lights, which are 1,000 to 10,000 times dimmer than sunlight and the wrong part of the spectrum,” says Turner. “We believe the effect is huge and that it’s just beginning to be recognized as a problem.""

Submission + - Recording Industry stealing from YouTube creators (

dingram17 writes: "Bruce Simpson from has found that the automatic pattern matching used by YouTube to identify copyright violations has flagged his videos. As he says "if the dull monotone voice you'll find on my RCModelReviews channel now qualifies as "music" (as they've claimed it does) then there can be little hope for that industry". Homeshot videos without any music at all are being flagged. The sinister aspect to this is that the 'claimant' then gets the advertising revenue from the video, not the creator that spent all the effort making the video. In Bruce's case, this ad revenue puts food on the table."

Submission + - The Pirate Bay: Banned in the UK? (

redletterdave writes: "Swedish filesharing website The Pirate Bay may soon be blocked in the UK after a London judge ruled that the site breaches copyright laws on a large scale, and that both the platform and its users illegally share copyrighted material like movies and music. In addition to finding legal fault with The Pirate Bay and its users, the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) also wants all British Internet service providers (ISPs) to block access to The Pirate Bay in the UK."

Submission + - Drones to fight bark beetles? (

garymortimer writes: "Our nation’s forests face blight on a scale rarely seen before. This is a pestilence that threatens to engulf our natural resources, laying them to waste. It not only is destroying the health of our forests, as well as their majestic look, but is ruining whole industries that rely on trees as a resource. It is raising the fire danger in these areas, taking homes away from animals, and makes thinning of the forests difficult with the debris of its passing due to fallen trees. This is the plague of the bark beetle and it is currently near unstoppable.

While some remote telemetry is used, most of the finding of the beetles (the first step to defeating them) is mainly ground work, and therefore the paper will then propose a few new methods using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as a way to find the bugs."

The Military

Submission + - Nuclear Truckers Haul Warheads Across US

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "As you weave through interstate traffic, you're unlikely to notice a plain-looking Peterbilt tractor-trailer and have no idea that inside the cab an armed federal agent operates a host of electronic countermeasures to keep outsiders from accessing his heavily armored cargo: a nuclear warhead. Adam Weinstein writes that the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) employs nearly 600 couriers to move bombs, weapon components, radioactive metals for research, and fuel for Navy ships and submarines between a variety of labs, reactors and military bases. Hiding nukes in plain sight, and rolling them through major metropolitan centers raises a slew of security and environmental concerns, from theft to terrorist attack to radioactive spills. "Any time you put nuclear weapons and materials on the highway, you create security risks," says Tom Clements, a nuclear security watchdog for Friends of the Earth. For security, cabs are fitted with custom composite armor and lightweight armored glass, a redundant communications systems that link the convoys to a monitoring center in Albuquerque, and the driver has the ability to disable the truck so it can't be moved or opened. The OST hires military veterans, particularly ex-special-operations forces (PDF), who are trained in close-quarters battle, tactical shooting, physical fitness, and shifting smoothly through the gears of a tractor-trailer. But accidents happen. In 1996, a driver flipped his trailer on a two-lane Nebraska hill road after a freak ice storm, sending authorities scrambling to secure its payload of two nuclear bombs and in 2003, two trucks operated by private contractors had rollover accidents in Montana and Tennessee while hauling uranium hexafluoride, a compound use to enrich reactor and bomb fuel."

Never say you know a man until you have divided an inheritance with him.