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Comment: happened in philly suburb (Score 1) 474

I live in a suburb of Philadelphia, PA and comcast tried to do this to me. They did send me a notice though. I replaced their router with a third party wifi router and cable modem. I didn't trust that they would keep their traffic separate from my traffic and I didn't see how someone hanging off of my router wouldn't degrade my service.

Comment: large playlist handling and skipless play (Score 2) 400

by soldack (#45476209) Attached to: Winamp Shutting Down On December 20

Winamp was the first player that could handle massive playlists. I could drag a network folder with over 80 GB of music and it would populate the playlist in seconds. I could then randomize and walk through that list without repeats for days. It also played skipless so that live albums didn't have annoying breaks. New players today still can't do that. Sigh. Their android app is pretty good too. I guess I will jump to amazon now. Their cloud playing is great.

Comment: openwrt is very well maintained, full featured (Score 1) 193

by soldack (#45072963) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Open Source Project For a Router/Wi-Fi Access Point?

We use openwrt as a base OS. It works pretty well. It has a lot of packages and many single board computer vendors support it. It is pretty hackable and has lots of embedded patches that would never make it into mainline linux but you really need on embedded platforms.

+ - google drive is down

Submitted by soldack
soldack (48581) writes "Both my personal and professional (paid) google drive accounts are showing no documents. They just show an error: The server encountered an error. Please try again later."

Comment: Re:Best example of Vaporware I've heard in a while (Score 1) 130

by soldack (#41993137) Attached to: New WiFi Protocol Boosts Congested Wireless Network Throughput By 700%

My thought is what if a LAN client, C, is sending UDP traffic through the AP to A. As long it blasts, B can barely speak. It would be interesting if they were dynamically altering the multi-rate retry algorithm to decrease retries as the queue filled and to even turn on ack requests when the queue was all the way filled. That can help at the cost of reliability. Send it and forget it.
I wonder if they experimented with traditional router methods of dealing with queuing issues. Things like Random early drop may help as well.

Comment: Re:Best example of Vaporware I've heard in a while (Score 1) 130

by soldack (#41991073) Attached to: New WiFi Protocol Boosts Congested Wireless Network Throughput By 700%

While the AP is sending faster and more often, clients will suffer. If the AP is blasting to client A, client B will struggle to upload. This may cause client B to disconnect or reassociate. It isn't clear how they prevent starvation at the client transmit side.

Comment: dynamic QoS (Score 1) 130

by soldack (#41991025) Attached to: New WiFi Protocol Boosts Congested Wireless Network Throughput By 700%

As their txqueue fills up they are just shifting packets from the best effort queue to the video queue and then to the voice queue (highest priority). These queues use more air time and have less space between packets. I am curious how it performs under a variety of traffic conditions (upload vs. download vs. mix). It would seem that if uploads and downloads are done at the same time, the downloads will block the uploads. What if the clients do the same thing?

Comment: More importantly why don't more want to? (Score 1) 767

by soldack (#41358281) Attached to: Can Anyone Become a Programmer?

I think enjoying programming is some kind of genetic mutation. No matter who good the software jobs market is, few people get CS degrees or otherwise want to be software engineers or programmers. It isn't quite a mono-culture but programmers and software engineers have so much in common that one can almost forget about how the rest of the world thinks. As you move out to other engineering disciplines, there are still an amazing number of personality traits and interests in common.
This is all good for those of us who enjoy programming and would like to be paid well to do it but it is strange to me. I often see IEEE and ACM articles about how to "fix" this issue but I don't think it can be fixed. Most folks would not like what we do even if they were totally capable of doing it.

Comment: Sounds more like advice to get more compliant help (Score 1) 630

by soldack (#41308593) Attached to: Is a Computer Science Degree Worth Getting Anymore?

It sounds like advice to other folks to hire people without a degree in the field so that they will be more loyal to you and less expensive. Without a lot of experience this is true. Folks with a year or two of experience with a degree will earn more than folks with a year or two of experience without a degree. That said, after a few more years it events out.

In the end, you have to judge the individual, what they learned, and how they learned it. I have met idiots who had a degree (even multiple degrees!) and idiots who had no formal education. They come in all shapes and sizes. Anyone who thinks in blanket statements like, "All college graduates in CS are worse than self taught" is proving my point.

I found my programs at West Chester (CS undergrad) and Villanova (master computer engineering) to be very useful and improved my abilities at work. I learned a lot in both and I had been programming since I was 7 or so on my TRS-80 Model III. They also made me more marketable. I feel it was totally worth it.

Comment: Re:Not appropriate (Score 1) 200

by soldack (#41217577) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Ad-Hoc Wireless Mesh Network For Emergency Vehicles?

The military is using meshing products from the company I work at, Rajant, http://www.rajant.com/. They are secure enough for their use. As for reliable, we are used in open pit mining operations with 100s of mobile nodes in vehicles that are like multistory buildings on wheels. These folks loose tons of money if they are down for just the smallest amount of time and they rely on our meshing networks for their fleet control.

Comment: Rajant for rugged mobile mesh (Score 1) 200

by soldack (#41217535) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Ad-Hoc Wireless Mesh Network For Emergency Vehicles?

I work at http://www.rajant.com/ so I may be a bit biased but our BreadCrumb line will work great for rugged meshing. We support 4.9 GHz radios that are reserved for emergency responders. We are in use by the military and large mining operations that require 24/7/365 networks with 100s of nodes and lives on the line.

The only possible interpretation of any research whatever in the `social sciences' is: some do, some don't. -- Ernest Rutherford

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