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Submission + - Quitting MacBook Pro For Chromebook (

snydeq writes: "Simon Phipps provides an in-depth account of an ongoing shift from a MacBook Pro to a Chromebook. ' My experiences using a Chromebook for a month have been so good I believe it deserves serious consideration. ... The Chromebook line is probably the most successful Linux desktop/laptop computer we've seen to date. Most of the software on the device is open source and it relies heavily on open standards. The options for updating it yourself are openly discussed, and enterprising hackers have even loaded full GNU/Linux distributions onto it. ... It reminds me very much of the experience of adjusting to thin client computing five years ago. I can imagine it fitting easily into a corporate environment, especially using the administrative control features Google sells for business users. Businesses open to using a thin client desktop should be evaluating Chromebooks and Chromeboxes — they are today's open source equivalent of yesterday's proprietary thin clients and Sun Rays.'"
Open Source

Submission + - 5 Key Forces Driving Open Source Today (

snydeq writes: "Simon Phipps discusses the 15-year evolution of the open source movement, outlining the five key forces driving open source forward today. 'Today's open source movement is more mature, and the trends underlining it are more nuanced and widely engaged. The revolution has had a meaningful impact, and to treat open source as if it is still about saving a few bucks on a software license or socking it to Microsoft is to misunderstand how far the open source movement has come. The following five trends are key drivers of today's open source communities and projects. From governance to emerging revenue models, they paint a picture of an industry evolving to see the value of the freedoms at the heart of the open source movement.'"
Open Source

Submission + - Best Open Source Software of the Year (

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld has announced the winners of its sixth annual Best of Open Source Software Awards, including more than 100 worthy projects across seven categories, from desktop apps, to databases, to application development tools. 'We've taken it upon ourselves to plow through all that frenetic activity and dig up the juiciest, smartest, and most useful open source software available. If you'd just like to page through from beginning to end, start here. Stick around in this article and you'll get a tour of the important trends in open source this year.'"
Open Source

Submission + -'s Crowdfunders: Taken For A Ride? (

snydeq writes: "At least 10,000 people believe in's vision of a messaging platform for Web apps — but it's unclear whether those people will be peers or sharecroppers, writes Simon Phipps. 'Last week reached the milestone of 10,000 users who signed up for a new — mostly yet to be written — social network that looks like an early reimplementation of Twitter. Signing up people to claim user names on an (not vaporware) alpha Web service may not seem surprising or novel, but this time there's a difference: Everyone who signed up for paid $50 for the privilege,' Phipps writes. ' has used the crowdfunding approach, but it's not the same kind of project. While superficially similar — there's an offer of immediate use of its Twitter-clone service and reservation of the user ID of your choice — it's much more speculative. It's crowdsourcing the seed capital for a new venture, crowdsourcing the design, crowdsourcing the testing, and crowdsourcing most of the software that interacts with the venture, all without actually giving anyone but the founder a true stake in the outcome.'"
Open Source

Submission + - Great Open Source Map Tools For Web Developers (

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Peter Wayner surveys the rich ecosystem of free maps, free data, and free libraries that give developers excellent alternatives to Google Maps. 'The options are expanding quickly as companies are building their own databases for holding geographical data, their own rendering tools for building maps, and their own software for embedding the maps in websites. ... Working with these tools can be a bit more complex than working with a big provider like Google. Some of these companies make JavaScript tools for displaying the maps, and others just deliver the raw tiles that the browsers use to assemble the maps. Working with the code means making decisions about how you want to assemble the pieces — now within your control. You can stick with one simple library or combine someone else's library with tiles you produce yourself.'"

Submission + - Is OpenStack The New Linux? (

snydeq writes: "As the self-proclaimed 'cloud OS for the datacenter,' OpenStack is fast becoming one of the more intriguing movements in open source — complete with lofty ambitions, community in-fighting, and commercial appeal. But questions remain whether this project can reach its potential of becoming the new Linux. 'The allure of OpenStack is clear: Like Linux, OpenStack aims to provide a kernel around which all kinds of software vendors can build businesses. But with OpenStack, we're talking multiple projects to provide agile cloud management of compute, storage, and networking resources across the data center — plus authentication, self-service, resource monitoring, and a slew of other projects. It's hugely ambitious, perhaps the most far-reaching open source project ever, although still at a very early stage. ... Clearly, the sky-high aspirations of OpenStack both fuel its outrageous momentum and incur the risk of overreach and collapse, as it incites all manner of competition. The promise is big, but the success of OpenStack is by no means assured.'"

Submission + - Microsoft To Run Linux On Azure (

snydeq writes: "After years of battling Linux as a competitive threat, Microsoft is now offering Linux-based operating systems on its Windows Azure cloud service. The Linux services will go live on Azure at 4 a.m. EDT on Thursday. At that time, the Azure portal will offer a number of Linux distributions, including Suse Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP2, OpenSuse 12.01, CentOS 6.2 and Canonical Ubuntu 12.04. Azure users will be able to choose and deploy a Linux distribution from the Microsoft Windows Azure Image Gallery and be charged on an hourly pay-as-you-go basis."
Open Source

Submission + - What's Next After GPL and Apache? (

snydeq writes: "Simon Phipps discusses the likely outcome of a shift in open source license use among community and commercial projects, in light of recent indications of a decline in the use of the GPL in favor of Apache. 'While the newest open source projects such as OpenStack and OpenShift have chosen to use the Apache License, I believe in time we will see the licensing trend for new open source projects targeted at commercial collaboration swing back to the center, away from either the GPL or Apache extremities,' Phipps writes. Enter the Mozilla Foundation's updated MPLv2, which Phipps believes 'occupies a sweet spot: permissive enough for corporations, copyleft enough for communities, and well-written to boot.'"

Submission + - Oracle: Google Knowingly 'Broke The Rules' With Java (

snydeq writes: "Oracle and Google kicked off a high-stakes jury trial in San Francisco on Monday, with Oracle arguing that Google ran roughshod over its intellectual property rights because the search giant was scared of getting left behind in the mobile advertising business. "This case is about Google's use, in Google's business, of somebody else's property without permission," said Michael Jacobs, an attorney for Oracle, in his opening remarks to the jury. Jacobs cited several emails to and from Google executives that he said would show that Google knew it needed a license for Java and that, having failed to negotiate one, it developed Android with Java anyway."
Open Source

Submission + - Red Hat's $1 Billion Proves Value Of Software Freedom (

snydeq writes: "Open Sources' Simon Phipps discusses how Red Hat's success is paving the way for open source in corner offices. 'This week, an open source company — Red Hat — reported annual revenues of more than $1 billion for the first time. For the full fiscal year 2012, total revenue was $1.13 billion, an increase of 25 percent over the prior year. That's more remarkable than it may seem. As Red Hat exec and open source pioneer Michael Tiemann comments, "I have found that for every $1 Red Hat sells, we have to displace $10 of proprietary junk that never really worked in the first place." Red Hat didn't get big the easy way; instead, it's been a purveyor of liberty to CIOs.'"
Open Source

Submission + - Linux Gets Bigger Shield Against Patent Attacks (

snydeq writes: "The open source community should feel a little safer from software patent attacks, writes InfoWorld's Simon Phipps. 'The Open Invention Network (OIN), a consortium of Linux contributors formed as a self-defense against software patents, has extended the definition of Linux so that a whopping 700 new software packages are covered, including many developer favorites. Just one hitch: The new definition also includes carve-outs that put all Linux developers on notice that Phillips and Sony reserve the right to sue over virtualization, search, user interfaces, and more.'"
Open Source

Submission + - Best Business Technologies of the Year (

snydeq writes: "The InfoWorld Test Center has announced the best business technologies of the past year based on extensive hands-on testing of enterprise hardware, software, and cloud services. 'Many of the winners — but far from all — are new to the list, but that doesn't mean they're new to us. One of the list's most distinctive features is how much it repeats the past, illustrating how much technology builds on what came before. Even the new entries are several years in the making. They didn't appear out of nowhere, but captured the strengths of trends that have been building for numerous years.' From Hadoop, to XenDesktop, to Node.js, to vSphere, this year's winners run the gamut of the IT stack, and include open source projects and proprietary offerings alike."

Submission + - How HP And Open Source Can Save WebOS (

snydeq writes: "If HP wants a future for struggling WebOS, it must invest in the platform, not abandon it, writes Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister. 'It seems HP may only be truly committed to the platform if it can offload the cost of developing and maintaining it. Yet if that's what HP hopes to achieve by opening the WebOS source, it's bound to be disappointed.' Instead, HP should dedicated its own developer resources and 'release as much code as possible under an Apache, BSD, or similarly permissive license. Dual licensing under the GPL might leave HP with more opportunities to monetize the platform, but it won't garner as much interest from hardware makers, who are what WebOS needs most.'"
Open Source

Submission + - In Favor Of FreeBSD On The Desktop ( 1

snydeq writes: "Deep End's Paul Venezia wonders why more folks aren't using FreeBSD on the desktop. 'There used to be a saying — at least I've said it many times — that my workstations run Linux, my servers run FreeBSD. Sure, it's quicker to build a Linux box, do a "yum install x y z" and toss it out into the wild as a fully functional server, but the extra time required to really get a FreeBSD box tuned will come back in spades through performance and stability metrics. You'll get more out of the hardware, be that virtual or physical, than you will on a generic Linux binary installation.'"
Open Source

Submission + - Why Eucalyptus Will Win Out Vs. OpenStack (

snydeq writes: "Open source history suggests vendor-backed Eucalyptus will ultimately win out over the foundation-based Open Stack as the open source cloud platform of choice for IT going forward. 'History has shown that when an open source project is dealing with a valuable layer of the software stack, that project has tended to be controlled by a single vendor that can directly make money from the project,' Rodrigues writes. 'History also shows that when an open source project is dealing with a commodity layer of the software stack, the project tends to be controlled by a foundation.' The question then boils down to whether cloud platforms are indeed a valuable layer, and thus directly monetizable, as Red Hat proved with Linux, or are they a commodity layer, like Apache HTTP Server or Eclipse. Ultimately, Rodrigues believes that the private cloud will prove to be a valuable component of the IT stack, thereby favoring Eucalyptus' AWS-based private cloud platform."

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