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Submission + - Facebook Prism Pushes Beyond Hadoop's Limits (

snydeq writes: "Facebook has said that it will soon open source Prism, an internal project that supports geographically distributed Hadoop data stores, thereby removing the limits on Hadoop's capacity to crunch data. 'The problem is that Hadoop must confine data to one physical data center location. Although Hadoop is a batch processing system, it's tightly coupled, and it will not tolerate more than a few milliseconds delay among servers in a Hadoop cluster. With Prism, a logical abstraction layer is added so that a Hadoop cluster can run across multiple data centers, effectively removing limits on capacity.'"

Submission + - Banking On Your Personal Online Data (

snydeq writes: "While privacy groups are working to lock away your personal data, a better — or perhaps supplementary — option may be to let you sell it for what it's really worth. 'Whether it's Facebook, Twitter, Google Drive, or Pinterest, the truth is the product is you — all that data about you used to target ads and sales pitches. It's hardly a new business model — it's how trade publications have made their money for decades — but in the online world all that information is easily stolen, traded, and spread. ... If the data has value — and we know it does — its creators (you and me) should be paid for it. And if we take over the selling of our data, all those companies using it now have to respect us and abide by our standards.'"

Submission + - Facebook Shouldn't Be Afraid To Rewrite Its Code (

snydeq writes: "Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister suggests that even wildly successful organizations like Facebook shouldn't be afraid of starting from scratch when it comes to their code, in light of recent comments by Michael Stonebraker that Facebook's complex MySQL installation has become 'a fate worse than death.' 'At the early phases of a Web project, developer efficiency is often even more important than the efficiency of your infrastructure. The longer it takes to bring a site to market, the more opportunity competitors have to outflank you. When your budget is modest, it makes sense to choose tools that allow the smallest staff possible to get the most done in the least amount of time,' McAllister writes, adding that 'investing in Web infrastructure is not the same as investing in steel and concrete. Building Web applications is a business that's intrinsically more agile and flexible than building real-world objects, which is a big part of what makes it such an exciting business to be in. So why not act like it?'"

Programmers used to batch environments may find it hard to live without giant listings; we would find it hard to use them. -- D.M. Ritchie