Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Submission + - Dev Shop Boot Camp: 7 Programming Languages In 7 Days (

snydeq writes: "Interested in vetting the cost of switching programming languages, Andrew C. Oliver ran an experiment on his firm's developers: learn a new language and developer a simple CRUD app in a day. 'Here are the results of this attempt to teach our developers seven languages in seven days. Armed with a pre-prepared PostgreSQL database and AJAX-y HTML, we implemented Granny [the CRUD app] as a "quintessential application" in Java, Kotlin, Ruby, Scala, Clojure, JavaScript (Node.js), and Go. You can find the list of GitHub URLs and basic instructions here. These aren't necessarily "best practices," and with a 24-hour deadline, there are bound to be mistakes. Still, the code is a good idea of comparative implementations in the various languages, as you'll see.'"
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Developer Divide: 19 Generations Of Computer Programmers ( 2

snydeq writes: From punch cards to JavaScript, computing history owes everything to the generations of develoeprs and engineers who have programmed the machines. 'Each developer generation has a distinctive flavor, often defined by a programming language or technology. They burst out with newborn fervor before settling into a comfortable middle age. They may not be on the top of the pop charts after a few years, but they're often still kicking because software never really dies. These new technologies often group programmers by generation. When programmers enter the job market and learn a language, they often stick with the same syntax for life — or at least as long as they can before having to make a switch. It's not that it's hard to learn a new language; they're all pretty similar underneath. It's just that you can often make more money with the expertise you have, so the generations live on. Here is our guide to some of the more dominant tech generations in computer history, as embodied by the programmers who gave them life.'

Submission + - Roll-Your-Own Dev Projects To Avoid (

snydeq writes: Andrew C. Oliver warns that rolling your own code can often be a waste of time and money. 'Many developers like to create software from scratch, even when there's perfectly good reusable code from other projects, open source, or even commercial products available to do the job. ... Whatever the reason, rolling your own code can be a waste of time and effort, as well as an opportunity for bugs to creep in — after all, new code is more likely to have bugs than existing code that's been reviewed and tested,' Oliver writes, offering a look at nine types of software projects that really shouldn't be roll-your-own efforts.

Submission + - 7 Apps Making The Most of HTML5 ( 1

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Peter Wayner offers a look at how seven powerful apps are implementing the HTML5 vision and how one high-profile detractor lost its love for the Web's next big thing. 'All provide insights on how to make the most of HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS, while avoiding the hard truths of relying on Web technologies to deliver your treasured app to your users.'"

Submission + - 9 Key Career Issues Software Developers Face (

snydeq writes: "Peter Wayner outlines nine concerns today's developers face in charting out a career path, from certifications, to the value of a computer science degree, to how to deal with ageism and the offshoring threat. 'Whether you're an independent contractor or a cubicle loyalist with a wandering eye, programming want ads abound, each stirring its own set of questions about how best to steer your career. For some, this is entirely new territory, having fallen into employment with computers simply as a means to scratch an itch. The following nine concerns are central to charting your career path. Some target the résumé. Others offer opportunities for career growth in themselves. Then there are questions of how to navigate unfortunate employment issues particular to IT. Thinking about your answers to these questions is more than a way of preparing for when someone comes to ask them. It is the first step in making the most of your interests and skills.'"

Submission + - The Truth About 'Rock-Star' Developers (

snydeq writes: "You want the best and the brightest money can buy. Or do you? Andrew Oliver offers six hard truths about 'rock-star' developers, arguing in favor of mixed skill levels with a focus on getting the job done: 'A big, important project has launched — and abruptly crashed to the ground. The horrible spaghetti code is beyond debugging. There are no unit tests, and every change requires a meeting with, like, 40 people. Oh, if only we'd had a team of 10 "rock star" developers working on this project instead! It would have been done in half the time with twice the features and five-nines availabilty. On the other hand, maybe not. A team of senior developers will often produce a complex design and no code, thanks to the reasons listed below.'"

Submission + - What Developers Can Learn From Anonymous (

snydeq writes: "'Regardless of where you stand on Anonymous' tactics, politics, or whatever, I think the group has something to teach developers and development organizations,' writes Andrew Oliver. 'As leader of an open source project, I can revoke committer access for anyone who misbehaves, but membership in Anonymous is a free-for-all. Sure, doing something in Anonymous' name that even a minority of "members" dislike would probably be a tactical mistake, but Anonymous has no trademark protection under the law; the organization simply has an overall vision and flavor. Its members carry out acts based on that mission. And it has enjoyed a great deal of success — in part due to the lack of central control. Compare this to the level of control in many corporate development organizations. Some of that control is necessary, but often it's taken to gratuitous lengths. If you hire great developers, set general goals for the various parts of the project, and collect metrics, you probably don't need to exercise a lot of control to meet your requirements.'"
Open Source

Submission + - Great Open Source Map Tools For Web Developers (

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Peter Wayner surveys the rich ecosystem of free maps, free data, and free libraries that give developers excellent alternatives to Google Maps. 'The options are expanding quickly as companies are building their own databases for holding geographical data, their own rendering tools for building maps, and their own software for embedding the maps in websites. ... Working with these tools can be a bit more complex than working with a big provider like Google. Some of these companies make JavaScript tools for displaying the maps, and others just deliver the raw tiles that the browsers use to assemble the maps. Working with the code means making decisions about how you want to assemble the pieces — now within your control. You can stick with one simple library or combine someone else's library with tiles you produce yourself.'"

Submission + - 7 Hard Truths About The NoSQL Revolution (

snydeq writes: "The NoSQL buzzword has been metastasizing for several years. The excitement about these fast data stores has been intoxicating, but the honeymoon is coming to an end, and it's time to start balancing our enthusiasm with some gimlet-eyed hard truths about NoSQL data stores. 'The smartest developers knew this from the beginning, noting that NoSQL stood for "Not Only SQL." This list of gripes, big and small, is thus an attempt to document this fact and to clear the air. It's meant to set things straight now so that we can do a better job understanding the trade-offs and the compromises.'"

Submission + - When Functional Programming Makes Sense (

snydeq writes: "Unless you've been living under a rock, you know functional programming languages rank among the hottest languages used by so-called alpha geeks, writes Andrew Oliver. While this brave new world is upon us, and before we take things too far, it might be a good time to pause and reflect on the appropriateness of functional programming for everyday application development. 'Functional programming addresses the concurrency problem of state but often at a cost of human readability. Functional programmming may be entirely appropriate for many circumstances. Ironically, it might even help bring computer and human languages closer together indirectly through defining domain-specific languages. But its difficult syntax makes it an extremely poor fit for general-purpose application programming. Don't jump on this bandwagon just yet — especially for risk-averse projects.'"

Submission + - The Long Death Of Fat Clients (

snydeq writes: "With Adobe's divestment of Flex and mobile Flash and Microsoft's move from Silverlight to Metro, Oracle now seems all alone in believing that a fat client framework — in the form of JavaFX — is a worthwhile investment, writes Andrew Oliver. 'Fewer and fewer options exist for developing purely fat client desktop applications and fewer still for RAD applications with Web-based delivery (aka, "thick clients"). We are on the verge of a purely HTML/JavaScript client world. Or we would be, if it weren't for mobile pushing us back to client-side development.'"

Submission + - Ruby, Clojure, Ceylon: Same Goal, Different Results (

snydeq writes: "Charles Nutter, Rich Hickey, and Gavin King each discovered that 'simplicity' doesn't mean the same thing as they developed Ruby, Clojure, and Ceylon, respectively. 'Languages that are created with similar goals in mind may yield highly disparate final results, depending on how their communities understand those goals,' writes Andrew Oliver. 'At first, it surprised me that each language's creator directly or indirectly identified simplicity as his goal, as well as how differently the three creators and their languages' communities define what simplicity is. For Ruby, it is about a language that feels natural and gets out of your way to do what you want. For Clojure, it is about keeping the language itself simple. For Ceylon, it is a compromise between enabling the language to help, in King's words, "communicating algorithms to humans" and providing proper tooling support: the same general goal, three very different results.'"

Submission + - Microsoft Relents On Metro-Only VS Express (

snydeq writes: "After hearing objections from developers, Microsoft will offer a version of its Visual Studio Express 2012 package for desktop application development after all. The company had previously announced that Express 2012 editions, which are free, platform-specific versions of the Visual Studio 2012 IDE, would be limited to Windows 8 Metro-style development as well as development for the Windows Azure cloud platform, Windows Phone, and Web applications. 'We heard from our community that developers want to have for Windows desktop development the same great experience and access to the latest Visual Studio 2012 features at the Express level. ... And it will enable developers working on open source applications to target existing and previous versions of Windows.'"

Submission + - Review: WAMP Stacks For Web developers (

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Serdar Yegulalp provides an in-depth comparison of five WAMP stacks for Web developers, including AMPPS, WAMPStack, MS Web Platform Installer, XAMPP, and WampServer. 'One thing that's clear from having looked at these stacks: They're definitely not created equal. They may be built from the same components (they would scarcely be useful if they weren't!), but how those components are managed and deployed makes a big difference. Stacks with automatic customization are far handier, especially when you want to devote more of your attention to working with the stack than actually setting it up. Second, don't assume these stacks will be production-ready. ... Finally, the differences in deployment styles between each of these stacks means there's a stack for just about every need, application type, or work habit.'"

Use the Force, Luke.