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Submission + - Who Controls Vert.x: Red Hat, VMware, Neither? (

snydeq writes: "Simon Phipps sheds light on a fight for control over Vert.x, an open source project for scalable Web development that 'seems immunized to corporate control.' 'Vert.x is an asynchronous, event-driven open source framework running on the JVM. It supports the most popular Web programming languages, including Java, JavaScript, Groovy, Ruby, and Python. It's getting lots of attention, though not necessarily for the right reasons. A developer by the name of Tim Fox, who worked at VMware until recently, led the Vert.x project — before VMware's lawyers forced him to hand over the Vert.x domain, blog, and Google Group. Ironically, the publicity around this action has helped introduce a great technology with an important future to the world. The dustup also illustrates how corporate politics works in the age of open source: As corporate giants grasp for control, community foresight ensures the open development of innovative technology carries on.'"

Submission + - Google Chrome: The New Web Platform? ( 1

snydeq writes: "The Chrome dev team is working toward a vision of Web apps that offers a clean break from traditional websites, writes Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister, in response to Google's new Field Guide for Web Applications. 'When you add it up, it starts to look as though, for all the noise Google makes about Web standards, Chrome is moving further and further apart from competing browsers, just by virtue of its technological advantages. In that sense, maybe Chrome isn't just a Web browser; maybe Chrome itself is the platform — or is becoming one.'"

Submission + - Why Microsoft Developers Need a Style Guide ( 2

snydeq writes: "What your interface communicates to users can be just as important as what your software does, writes Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister in discussing the latest edition of the 'Microsoft Manual of Style,' a style guide aimed at designers and developers who create Microsoft software, as well as those who write about it. 'The gist of much of Microsoft's advice is that a user's relationship with computer software is a unique one, and it's important to craft the language of software UIs accordingly,' McAllister writes. 'Occasionally, Microsoft's recommendations verge on the absurd. For example, you might not think it necessary to admonish developers to "not use slang that may be considered profane or derogatory, such as 'pimp' or 'bitch,'" but apparently it is.'"

Submission + - JavaScript Upgrade To Feature Modularization (

snydeq writes: "The next major upgrade to the JavaScript platform, tentatively named ECMAScript 6, is set to feature modularization along with other improvements aimed at providing developers with more convenience and security, InfoWorld reports. Also eyed for version 6 is binary data support, private key capabilities, string interpolation, and a new generators capability to boost asynchronous programs."

Submission + - Gosling: Oracle Selfishness Should Benefit Java (

snydeq writes: "Java founder James Gosling sees Oracle having no choice but to do a good job in its stewardship of Java, InfoWorld reports. Speaking at the Java Symposium, Gosling reprimanded Oracle's behavior toward Java user groups, but ultimately suggested that Oracle's heavy reliance on Java will ultimately require it to be a good Java citizen. 'It's in their own self interest to not be aggressively stupid,' Gosling said."

Submission + - MS Click-to-Run: The Future of Software Delivery? (

snydeq writes: Fatal Exception's Neil McAllisters sees a hidden benefit in Microsoft's new Click-to-Run streaming installation technology, one that could create new revenue opportunities for smaller software vendors just as they appear to fast be drying up. Based on Microsoft's App-V, the technology allows Office 2010 beta testers to stream the productivity suite to their systems in stages, rather than download it all at once. 'Users don't have to wait for the entire suite to download to begin using the applications. Instead, modules are downloaded and installed as users need them,' McAllister writes. Moreover, the applications exist in isolated operating environments, allowing them to coexist with earlier versions on the same PC. But the real upside for smaller software vendors may be the way a technology like Click-to-Run breaks down applications into component modules, allowing them not only to deliver the functionality users are willing to pay for, but in a way easy enough for home computer users to accomplish — important in an era when software retail outlets are fast dying out to the big-box chains.

Some programming languages manage to absorb change, but withstand progress. -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982