Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:What is foursquare (Score 2) 92

by Have Blue (#41559787) Attached to: Curiosity Rover Makes First Foursquare Check-In On Another Planet
It's a service which helps you post your location/patronage on social media, basically. Rather than typing in "I'm at the Starbucks at 14th and 2nd Avenue" you use a GPS-driven search to find it.

It also gives you points for doing this and ranks your activity against your friends, which is why some people get really into it.

Comment: Re:Admitted Failure (Score 3, Informative) 451

by Have Blue (#41489081) Attached to: Apple CEO Tim Cook Apologizes For Maps App, Recommends Alternatives
Apple does show you a location which can be accurately described 315 E 15th- elsewhere in the city, on a different 15th Street. This location most closely matches the search term in that there is actually a building numbered 315 there, it just isn't in Manhattan.

If you force it to look only in Manhattan by searching for "315 E 15th St Manhattan", it does interpolate the building numbers as you describe and returns a location in the park.

http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/09/27/googles-ilost-motorola-ad-faked-an-address-to-lose-ios-6-maps

Comment: Re:iOS store price points were too low (Score 4, Informative) 270

by Have Blue (#39151685) Attached to: The Dark Side of Digital Distribution
That's not at all what happened. At the time the iPad was released, iPhone screens were all 480x320. The 960x640 phone came later (and, in the usual Apple fashion, not revealed to developers until that time).

Also, the store supports and encourages "universal" apps- a single purchase/single binary that works natively on both devices, and has done so since the iPad launched.

Comment: Re:Example of a publicly developed vaccine (Score 4, Informative) 491

by deglr6328 (#38223252) Attached to: Patent Expires On Best Selling Drug of All Time

I don't have the slightest clue as to why you're modded at +5, but I do know that you have literally no clue as to what in the hell you're talking about. I assume you're referring to the anti HPV vaccine Cevarix rather than Gardasil because you mention "the Australian taxpayer" and some of the technology used in Cevarix was discovered at Uni. Queensland. You conveniently neglect to mention that the Queensland researchers were collaborating with others at Georgetown, the Uni. of Rochester and the US National Cancer Institute, among others. The technology behind the discoveries made at these places was licensed to GlaxoSmithKline, a British company. The idea that the Australian taxpayer footed the bill for the FDA trials in the US is, frankly, idiotic. The trials were conducted by Glaxo, obviously. Additionally, there is no "US drug company that licenced [sic] it", it's being sold by Glaxo here just as it is everywhere else.

I know it's a crying shame that none of this fits into your wacky worldview where all corporations represent the nexus of evil and steal all their product ideas from "the people", but I guess you'll just have to find some way to get over it. I suggest you take some of your own advice about "paying more attention before writing" before your next post.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 800

by Have Blue (#37934676) Attached to: Siri Gives Apple Two Year Advantage Over Android
Talking at your phone like it was microphone makes you look like a total mong. Talking into a phone held up to your ear makes you look like a normal person having an important conversation.

That's why Siri ties into the phone's proximity sensor and will automatically start listening if you hold the phone up to your ear, so you can use it without having to look stupid.

Comment: Re:No kidding (Score 1) 1452

by Have Blue (#37673672) Attached to: Richard Stallman's Dissenting View of Steve Jobs
Funny you should mention that as a counterexample, because there's an anecdote about Steve Jobs and rounded corners:

Bill [Atkinson] fired up his demo and it quickly filled the Lisa screen with randomly-sized ovals, faster than you thought was possible. But something was bothering Steve Jobs. "Well, circles and ovals are good, but how about drawing rectangles with rounded corners? Can we do that now, too?"

"No, there's no way to do that. In fact it would be really hard to do, and I don't think we really need it". I think Bill was a little miffed that Steve wasn't raving over the fast ovals and still wanted more.

Steve suddenly got more intense. "Rectangles with rounded corners are everywhere! Just look around this room!". And sure enough, there were lots of them, like the whiteboard and some of the desks and tables. Then he pointed out the window. "And look outside, there's even more, practically everywhere you look!". He even persuaded Bill to take a quick walk around the block with him, pointing out every rectangle with rounded corners that he could find.

When Steve and Bill passed a no-parking sign with rounded corners, it did the trick. "OK, I give up", Bill pleaded. "I'll see if it's as hard as I thought." He went back home to work on it.

Bill returned to Texaco Towers the following afternoon, with a big smile on his face. His demo was now drawing rectangles with beautifully rounded corners blisteringly fast, almost at the speed of plain rectangles. When he added the code to LisaGraf, he named the new primitive "RoundRects". Over the next few months, roundrects worked their way into various parts of the user interface, and soon became indispensable.

Jobs did not create brand new designs and schematics and techniques out of whole cloth; he had his research staff to do that. His contribution was pushing the researchers in the right directions, pulling them back from going in the wrong ones, and enforcing a consistent vision and design strategy for the whole enchilada.

Comment: Re:No kidding (Score 4, Insightful) 1452

by Have Blue (#37662668) Attached to: Richard Stallman's Dissenting View of Steve Jobs
The one who pushes a new idea past the tipping point can be at least as important as the one who came up with it in the first place. Tim Berners-Lee did not invent the Internet, but without the Web it could not have become the inextricable part of life that it is today.. Henry Ford did not invent the car, but he applied to it the industrial practices (which he did invent) that put it in a position to change the world. Steve Jobs did not invent the smartphone or the tablet but it's because of him that those are now household words and we're moving towards a world where everyone carries a personal Internet-enabled device at all times, and all the technological and social change that entails. That's already shaped 21st century society more than any other person in the technology (or fashion) industry has to date.
Graphics

Unreal Engine 3 Running In Flash 138

Posted by Soulskill
from the putting-a-v-8-in-a-yugo dept.
Eraesr writes with news that Epic Games has added Unreal Engine 3 support for Adobe Flash Player. This comes alongside news that Flash Player 11 has been released, an update that added Stage3D, "a set of low-level GPU-accelerated APIs enabling advanced 2D and 3D capabilities across multiple screens and devices." "With its new hardware-accelerated Stage 3D APIs, Flash Player 11 allows 1,000 times faster 2D and 3D graphics rendering performance over Flash Player 10. Developers can now animate millions of objects with smooth 60 frames per second rendering and deliver console-quality games on Mac OS, Windows and connected televisions. 'With UE3 and Flash, games built for high-end consoles can now run on the Web or as Facebook apps, reaching an enormous user base,' said Sweeney. 'This totally changes the playing field for game developers who want to widely deploy and monetize their games.'"

Comment: Re:Annoying at night... (Score 1) 107

by deglr6328 (#37380144) Attached to: Glowing Cats a New Tool in AIDS Research

Mmmmmno, they don't. The fish are FLUORescent, not PHOSPHORescent. They're transfected with GFP like these cats. Hence the name GFP: green fluorescent protein.

FLUORESCENCE PHOSPHORescence ELECTROluminescence GALVANOluminescence BIOLUMinescence

All these phenomena are distinct. I'm wondering if anyone has ever heard of any naturally occurring PHOSphorescent molecules.

Advertising is a valuable economic factor because it is the cheapest way of selling goods, particularly if the goods are worthless. -- Sinclair Lewis

Working...