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+ - Gravity measurements can predict river flooding ->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "When ground water saturates a river basin, the risk for flooding goes up. So does the strength of Earth’s gravity in that region, ever so slightly, because of the extra mass of the underground water. By using tiny variations in gravity detected from space, researchers report online today in Nature Geoscience that they can identify basins that are primed for flooding if additional rains come—sometimes with several months' warning."
Link to Original Source

+ - YouTube issuing "report cards" on carriers' streaming speeds

Submitted by OakDragon
OakDragon (885217) writes "In the shadow of the "Net Neutrality" debate, Google's YouTube has created a service to report on your carrier's usage and speed, summarizing the data in a "Lower/Standard/High Definition" graph. You may see the service offered when a video buffers or stutters. A message could display under the video asking "Experiencing interruptions? Find out why." Find your own provider's grade here."

+ - A Modest Proposal, re: Beta vs. Classic 19

Submitted by unitron
unitron (5733) writes "Dice wants to make money off of what they paid for--the Slashdot name--, or rather they want to make more money off of it than they are making now, and they think the best way to do that is to turn it into SlashingtonPost.

They should take this site and give it a new name. Or get Malda to let them use "Chips & Dips".

Leave everything else intact, archives, user ID database, everything except the name.

Then use the Beta code and start a new site and give it the slashdot.org name, and they can have what they want without the embarrassment of having the current userbase escape from the basement or the attic and offend the sensibilities of the yuppies or hipsters or metrosexuals or whoever it is that they really want for an "audience"."

+ - Julian Assange Video DMCA'ed Offline During Aussie Election

Submitted by Pav
Pav (4298) writes "On the verge of going viral (600,000 views in a week) this video was taken offline during the Australian election. It's a humourous spoof of the various contenders, plus a guest appearance by the real Julian Assange, who breaks into a few bars of "The Voice" by John Farnham, jarringly and an octave too low — apparently this was the cause of the DMCA concern."
Transportation

+ - Wisconsin Begins Using Cheese to De-Ice Their Roads 1

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "The NYT reports that Milwaukee has begun a pilot program to use cheese brine to keep city roads from freezing, mixing the dairy waste with traditional rock salt as a way to trim costs and ease pollution. “You want to use provolone or mozzarella,” says Jeffrey A. Tews, the fleet operations manager for the public works department, which has spread the cheesy substance in Bay View, a neighborhood on Milwaukee’s south side. “Those have the best salt content. You have to do practically nothing to it.” Local governments across the country have been experimenting with cheaper and environmentally friendly ways of thawing icy thoroughfares, trying everything from sugar beet juice to discarded brewery grain in an attempt to limit the use of road salt, which can spread too thin, wash away and pollute waterways. “If you put dry salt on a roadway, you typically lose 30 percent to bounce and traffic,” says Emil Norby, who works for Polk County and was the first in Wisconsin to come up with the cheese brine idea to help the salt stick. In a state where lawmakers once honored the bacterium in Monterey Jack as the state’s official microbe, residents of Bay View say they have noticed little difference, good or bad, in the smell of their streets, and city officials say they have received no complaints. The mayor of Bay View says it's an experiment, but one that makes sense. The brine will come from the Dresser Farm in Polk County, where it is already being used on the roads. The only cost will be for transportation and distribution. "We thought, 'Well, let's give it a shot.' The investment in this project is $1,474.""

+ - Music Lessons Boost Intellectual Development

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "It's been known for a long time that student musicians perform better than their peers on a variety of measures including better grades but studies have been plagued by the chicken-and-egg question. Is the effect due to their musical training? Or are sharper, more motivated kids more likely to take up an instrument? Now Tom Jacobs reports in the Pacific Standard that new research from Germany presents evidence that improved academic performance truly is a result of musical training. "Even after controlling for a large number of parental background differences, learning a musical instrument is associated with better cognitive skills and school grades, as well as higher conscientiousness, openness and ambition,” say Adrian Hille and Jurgen Schupp of the German Institute for Economic Research. Reverse causality is “highly unlikely to entirely explain our results." They found musically active kids are “more conscientious, open and ambitious” than their non-musical peers. In addition, they scored significantly higher on a standard cognitive skills test—an advantage that, somewhat surprisingly, “is driven by verbal rather than mathematical skills.” One theory is that music’s value, from an evolutionary perspective, revolves around music's ability to help people cope with cognitive dissonance—that intense feeling of discomfort that arises when we encounter information that contradicts one of our core beliefs. According to this hypothesis, the ability to live with such feelings allows us to be open to fresh, challenging ideas, leading to intellectual and emotional growth. Another theory writes Jacobs that kids who feel socially connected (say, as members of a school band) develop the confidence and self-esteem that can lead to intellectual curiosity, and better grades. ""

Comment: Because... (Score 5, Informative) 382

by snaFu07 (#45350701) Attached to: Republican Proposal Puts 'National Interest' Requirement On US Science Agency
"One day sir, you may tax it."
Faraday's reply to William Gladstone, then British Chancellor of the Exchequer (minister of finance), when asked of the practical value of electricity (1850), as quoted in The Harvest of a Quiet Eye : A Selection of Scientific Quotations (1977), p. 56 (wikiquote)

+ - Raspberry Pi to Get Camera Module Capable of 1080p Video Recording->

Submitted by hypnosec
hypnosec (2231454) writes "The Raspberry Pi Foundation has announced a new add-on – a camera module that will enable the credit card sized computer to snap pictures as well as record 1080p videos. Showcased by RS Components at the Elecontrica 2012 in Germany [watch video here] the £16 (apprx) module will be equipped with a 5MP sensor and will plug into the otherwise unused CSI pins of the Pi. The camera module’s board is still in prototype stage and is expected to reach production sometime soon. Liz Upton, Executive Director of the Foundation said in a blog post, “We’ve a (very) little way to go before we’re able to send it out to manufacture.” According to Upton, testing slots have been booked in December to check on electromagnetic radiations from the ribbon cable."
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - Senate Bill Gives Federal Reserve Warrantless Access to Your Emails and Facebook->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The Bill, The Electronic Communications Privacy Act, is supposed to make the internet more private, but instead has provided a wealth of organizations unfettered access to online communications. This grants warrantless access to government agency, including the ability to take over mail account without notifying owners or the judiciary. As a final affront, the Federal Reserve, which isn't even a government body with oversight, will have these powers"
Link to Original Source
Science

+ - Blind Patient Reads Words Stimulated Directly Onto the Retina

Submitted by
ScienceGeek.Michael
ScienceGeek.Michael writes "Neuroprosthetic device uses implant to project visual braille

For the very first time researchers have streamed braille patterns directly into a blind patient’s retina, allowing him to read four-letter words accurately and quickly with an ocular neuroprosthetic device. The device, the Argus II, has been implanted in over 50 patients, many of who can now see color, movement and objects. It uses a small camera mounted on a pair of glasses, a portable processor to translate the signal from the camera into electrical stimulation, and a microchip with electrodes implanted directly on the retina. The study was authored by researchers at Second Sight, the company who developed the device, and has been published in Frontiers in Neuroprosthetics on the 21st of November."

Comment: We've seen how it's done in Yes, minister. (Score 2) 295

by snaFu07 (#41413411) Attached to: Your Moral Compass Is Reversible
This reminds me of a clip from a British show called Yes, minister. This clip is about how to get two completely opposite answers on same topic, but in much shorter time.
While the series is about political tactics and machinations and it's satire of a political systems, it's spot-on. And if you watch real news after watching it, you'll uncontrollably laugh all the way.

Comment: SQL injection (Score 1) 289

by snaFu07 (#41326569) Attached to: QR Codes As Anti-Forgery On Currency Could Infect Banks

Since QR codes can hold arbitrary strings, why not sql injection attacks?

Given that at any time
    1) banks would not be the only party interested in tracking money and/or customers,
    2) codes would be scanned and entered into database,
    3) at some point tracking would become mandatory,
    4) there are still sloppy programmers out there building SQL statements by concatenating
      strings,
I can see, why this could be a not-so-good idea...

So... did you ever wonder, do garbagemen take showers before they go to work?

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