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+ - Public Mailing Lists are used for Flooding Attacks 1

Submitted by Tom Li
Tom Li writes: In last 24 hours, I have received more than 40k subscription confirmation emails from FOSS projects mailing lists (OpenBSD, GNU, Ubuntu, CentOS, etc). My mail have already stopped operating. "Subscribers" are from multiple IP addresses. After I shared my experience, I have found more than 10 victims from the same attack, included a well-known Chinese tech-blog writer (tweet in Chinese).

Since thousands of lists exist, flooding is easy. This is not the first attack. Last year, The GNOME foundation (FreeDesktop.org) faced the same problem, they solved it by adding reCAPTCHA by themselves.There are still no protection for most lists, e.g Fedora. If this method is used widely, such low-cost attacks will serious affects many users and developers.
Transportation

Uber Forced Out of Kansas 41

Posted by Soulskill
from the click-your-heels dept.
mpicpp sends news that Uber has been forced to leave Kansas. The company says a bill pushed through the state legislature (SB117) makes it impossible for the company to operate there. The bill had been vetoed by Kansas governor Sam Brownback, but lawmakers secured enough votes to override it. "The measure requires drivers for ride-hailing companies to undergo background checks through the Kansas Bureau of Investigation and hold additional auto insurance coverage for the period in which they have turned on the mobile app that connects them to riders."

+ - Uber? It's not in Kansas anymore->

Submitted by mpicpp
mpicpp writes: Need a cab in Kansas? You'll have to hail one the old-fashioned way. Uber isn't in Kansas anymore.

It stopped operations there Tuesday after the state legislature approved a new law the company says makes it "impossible" to keep operating.

Kansas legislators voted to override Gov. Sam Brownback's veto of new, stricter regulations on companies like Uber, that allow people to hail a ride with an app on their smartphone.

The governor said the new rules are "premature."
"To over-regulate or improperly regulate an emerging industry before the marketplace actors make proper arrangements is to invite more, problems, not less," he said in April, when he vetoed the legislation.

Uber first launched in Kansas about a year ago.
The company was actually on board with the original draft of the new rules. It required Uber to disclose certain information to customers, including how fares are calculated and the driver's license plate number before they get in the car. Uber already does those things in its app.

But, the final bill also requires Uber drivers to carry a level of insurance that the company said is not required in any other state.

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:But... (Score 2) 87

by Smidge204 (#49627485) Attached to: The World's Most Wasteful Megacity

As a resident of Suffolk County, about half the land area is pine barrens and farms. It sounds like they're deliberately stretching the definition of "city" to include a lot of territory that most honest people would not consider metropolitan at all. Many of the other counties they're including are in a similar state of relatively sparse population.

So if they're going to compare New York to Tokyo, applying the same logic, they should include the entirety of Japan as part of the "Tokyo Megacity."
=Smidge=

Privacy

French Version of 'Patriot Act' Becomes Law 91

Posted by Soulskill
from the privacy-surrenders dept.
Taco Cowboy writes: Thanks to the Charlie Hebdo massacre and other instances of terrorism, the French legislature has voted 438 to 86 in favor of the "Intelligence Service Bill," essentially a French version of the Patriot Act. It awards the French intelligence services sweeping powers to tap and intercept any kind of digital correspondence, including phone conversations, emails, and social media.

The bill decrees that hosting providers and Internet service providers in France must be equipped with a "black box" that can retain all digital communications from customers. "The new law would create a 13-member National Commission to Control Intelligence Techniques, which would be made up of six magistrates from the Council of State and the Court of Appeals, three representatives of the National Assembly, three senators from the upper house of Parliament and a technical expert. ... The only judicial oversight is a provision that allows the commission to lodge a complaint with the Council of State, but lawyers are doubtful that it could be convened on a routine basis." We previously discussed news that ISPs may leave France in protest if the bill was passed. Now we'll know shortly if those ISPs will live up to their word.

+ - Visualizations of Rebel Alliances in the UK Government->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: I just published this article and thought it might be of interest to Slashdot readers.

It's about a collection visualizations I created based on public voting data from The Public Whip project, which collects and normalizes voting data from the UK House of Commons. The visualizations show relationships between MPs, with a focus on agreement rates, and more interestingly — rebellion.

Link to Original Source
Earth

The World's Most Wasteful Megacity 87

Posted by Soulskill
from the it's-new-york dept.
merbs writes: The world's most wasteful megacity is a densely populated, steadily aging, consumerist utopia where we buy, and throw away, a staggering amount of stuff (abstract). Where some faucet, toilet, or pipe, is constantly leaking in our apartments. Where an armada of commerce-beckoning lights are always on. Where a fleet of gas-guzzling cars still clog the roadways. I, along with my twenty million or so neighbors, help New York City use more energy, suck down more water, and spew out more solid waste than any other mega-metropolitan area.

+ - The World's Most Wasteful Megacity

Submitted by merbs
merbs writes: The world’s most wasteful megacity is a densely populated, steadily aging, consumerist utopia where we buy, and throw away, a staggering amount of stuff. Where some faucet, toilet, or pipe, is constantly leaking in our apartments. Where an armada of commerce-beckoning lights are always on. Where a fleet of gas-guzzling cars still clog the roadways. I, along with my twenty million or so neighbors, help New York City use more energy, suck down more water, and spew out more solid waste than any other mega-metropolitan area.

Comment: A sneak peak at the results (Score 4, Funny) 48

by SuperKendall (#49626235) Attached to: SpaceX Testing Passenger Escape System Tomorrow

Don't tell anyone, but I'm from the future and wanted to give you a heads up how it goes:

Test 1: Make sure all thrusters installed pointing out.

Test 2: Humans can only withstand how much thrust?

Test 3: Make sure to thrust away from, not underneath, falling debris.

Test 4: Emergency homing signal for safe landing should be changed to not match Arbys drive through wireless mics. "Smoked with real smoke from real wood that's on real fire" ended up being a grimly accurate tagline.

Test 5: Turns out Ed was right and we really do need to add a laser canon for those damn pelicans.

Test 6: Success!

Network

The Ambitions and Challenges of Mesh Networks and the Local Internet Movement 41

Posted by Soulskill
from the net-positives-and-net-negatives dept.
Lashdots writes: Two artists in New York are hatching a plan to teach kids about the internet by building their own. They'll be creating a small, decentralized network, similar to a mesh network, to access other computers, and they'll be developing their own simple social network to communicate with other people. It's part of a growing movement to supplement the Internet with resilient, local alternatives. "And yet, while the decentralized, ad hoc network architecture appeals philosophically to tech-savvy users fed up with monopolistic ISPs, nobody’s found a way to make mesh networks work easily and efficiently enough to replace home Internet connections. Built more for resiliency than for speed, each participating router must continuously search for the best paths to far-flung machines. For now, that makes them of limited interest to many ordinary consumers who simply want to check their email and watch movies."

Comment: Re:Scientifically driven politics (Score 1) 341

FOIA requests can be used for targeted denial of service attacks, yes. Look at what this chick is doing to a public library: http://dc.uwm.edu/cgi/viewcont... She's just a dumb blonde (look at her kooky museum tour videos) but she's still managed to deluge the library with hundreds of FOIA requests (demanding shit like "all the data produced on all employees' computers over the past year", etc.) She's a lone kook not even employed by a major industry, and the library has to hire two full time employees just to respond to her FOIA requests. If they are legally required to respond to them, most small research teams would easily be shut down by a torrent of FOIA requests coming from deep-pocketed industries.

Comment: More than you know (Score 2) 114

wyoming has radiation?

Hell yes! Have you measured background radiation in the rockies?

communication delays?

Ever tried to maintain cell signal on the way to Yellowstone?

nothing to see, or to do?

Once you've seen Frontier Days once...

No medical equipment?

I go up there all the time with no medical equipment.

I don't know what that gravity would do to your digestive systems.

That's why every astronaut has died immediately after return from space with even less gravity...

I have to break character here and say - you are SUCH a retard. That's enough fun for me. You may carry on if you wish.

+ - The Ambitions And Challenges Of Mesh Networks and The Local Internet Movement->

Submitted by Lashdots
Lashdots writes: Recently, a pair of artists in New York put forward an unusual plan for teaching middle school students about the Internet: specifically, by teaching them how to get off it and build their own. With a private social network and a wireless "darknet," OurNet is part of a growing movement that aims to consider and build alternative digital networks. Using affordable, off-the-shelf hardware and open-source software, communities around the world are assembling small, independent, nonprofit wireless mesh networks... And yet, while the decentralized, ad hoc network architecture appeals philosophically to tech-savvy users fed up with monopolistic ISPs, nobody’s found a way to make mesh networks work easily and efficiently enough to replace many home Internet connections. Meanwhile, in spite of the challenges, hackers and artists have located a broader educational and philosophical element to these projects. Says Dan Phiffer, an artist and programmer: "We kind of realize that none of these systems that we use are inevitable."
Link to Original Source
Security

Cyberlock Lawyers Threaten Security Researcher Over Vulnerability Disclosure 63

Posted by Soulskill
from the what-year-is-this dept.
qubezz writes: Security researcher Phar (Mike Davis/IOActive) gave his 30 days of disclosure notice to Cyberlock (apparently a company that makes electronic lock cylinders) that he would release a public advisory on vulnerabilities he found with the company's security devices. On day 29, their lawyers responded with a request to refrain, feigning ignorance of the previous notice, and invoking mention of the DMCA (this is not actually a DMCA takedown notice, as the law firm is attempting to suppress initial disclosure through legal wrangling). Mike's blog states: "The previous DMCA threats are from a company called Cyberlock, I had planned to do a fun little blog post (cause i ... hate blog posts) on the fun of how I obtained one, extracted the firmware bypassing the code protection and figured out its "encryption" and did various other fun things a lock shouldn't do for what its marketed as.. But before I could write that post I needed to let them know what issues we have deemed weaknesses in their gear.. the below axe grinderery is the results. (sic)" What should researchers do when companies make baseless legal threats to maintain their security-through-obscurity? Related: Bitcoin exchange company Coinbase has been accused of spying on a dark net researcher.

Humanity has the stars in its future, and that future is too important to be lost under the burden of juvenile folly and ignorant superstition. - Isaac Asimov

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