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Comment: Re:Inflammatory description of article. (Score 1) 74

by Wonko the Sane (#48047727) Attached to: Intel Drops Gamasutra Sponsorship Over Controversial Editorials

The degree to which the SJW crowd has to resort to increasingly-inflammatory headlines and articles gives me a lot of hope, because it indicates that the collective unconscious of the Internet really does have a funcitoning immune response that can limit the damaged caused by that particularly nasty virus.

I was worried for a while.

Intel

Intel Drops Gamasutra Sponsorship Over Controversial Editorials 74

Posted by timothy
from the middle-of-the-road dept.
An anonymous reader writes Processor firm Intel has withdrawn its advertising from Gamasutra in response to the site's decision to carry feminist articles. The articles had drawn the ire of the self-described "Gater" movement, a grass-roots campaign to discredit prominent female games journalists. Intel was apparently so inundated with criticism for sponsoring the Gamasutra site that it had no choice but to withdraw support. An Intel spokesperson explained that "We take feedback from our customers very seriously especially as it relates to contextually relevant content and placements" and as such Gamasutra was no longer an appropriate venue for their products."

+ - MIT Thinks It Has Discovered the 'Perfect' Solar Cell->

Submitted by Daniel_Stuckey
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "A new MIT study offers a way out of one of solar power's most vexing problems: the matter of efficiency, and the bare fact that much of the available sunlight in solar power schemes is wasted. The researchers appear to have found the key to perfect solar energy conversion efficiency—or at least something approaching it. It's a new material that can accept light from an very large number of angles and can withstand the very high temperatures needed for a maximally efficient scheme.

Conventional solar cells, the silicon-based sheets used in most consumer-level applications, are far from perfect. Light from the sun arrives here on Earth's surface in a wide variety of forms. These forms—wavelengths, properly—include the visible light that makes up our everyday reality, but also significant chunks of invisible (to us) ultraviolet and infrared light. The current standard for solar cells targets mostly just a set range of visible light."

Link to Original Source
Security

Building a Honeypot To Observe Shellshock Attacks In the Real World 19

Posted by timothy
from the distract-them-with-fresh-targets dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes A look at some of the Shellshock-related reports from the past week makes it seem as if attackers are flooding networks with cyberattacks targeting the vulnerability in Bash that was disclosed last week. While the attackers haven't wholesale adopted the flaw, there have been quite a few attacks—but the reality is that attackers are treating the flaw as just one of many methods available in their tool kits. One way to get a front-row seat of what the attacks look like is to set up a honeypot. Luckily, threat intelligence firm ThreatStream released ShockPot, a version of its honeypot software with a specific flag, "is_shellshock," that captures attempts to trigger the Bash vulnerability. Setting up ShockPot on a Linux server from cloud host Linode.com is a snap. Since attackers are systematically scanning all available addresses in the IPv4 space, it's just a matter of time before someone finds a particular ShockPot machine. And that was definitely the case, as a honeypot set up by a Dice (yes, yes, we know) tech writer captured a total of seven Shellshock attack attempts out of 123 total attacks. On one hand, that's a lot for a machine no one knows anything about; on the other, it indicates that attackers haven't wholesale dumped other methods in favor of going after this particular bug. PHP was the most common attack method observed on this honeypot, with various attempts to trigger vulnerabilities in popular PHP applications and to execute malicious PHP scripts.

+ - Building a Honeypot to Observe Shellshock Attacks in the Real World->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "A look at some of the Shellshock-related reports from the past week makes it seem as if attackers are flooding networks with cyberattacks targeting the vulnerability in Bash that was disclosed last week. While the attackers haven’t wholesale adopted the flaw, there have been quite a few attacks—but the reality is that attackers are treating the flaw as just one of many methods available in their tool kits. One way to get a front-row seat of what the attacks look like is to set up a honeypot. Luckily, threat intelligence firm ThreatStream released ShockPot, a version of its honeypot software with a specific flag, “is_shellshock,” that captures attempts to trigger the Bash vulnerability. Setting up ShockPot on a Linux server from cloud host Linode.com is a snap. Since attackers are systematically scanning all available addresses in the IPv4 space, it’s just a matter of time before someone finds a particular ShockPot machine. And that was definitely the case, as a honeypot set up by a Dice (yes, yes, we know) tech writer captured a total of seven Shellshock attack attempts out of 123 total attacks. On one hand, that’s a lot for a machine no one knows anything about; on the other, it indicates that attackers haven’t wholesale dumped other methods in favor of going after this particular bug. PHP was the most common attack method observed on this honeypot, with various attempts to trigger vulnerabilities in popular PHP applications and to execute malicious PHP scripts."
Link to Original Source

+ - Intel drops sponsorship of Gamasutra in response to feminist articles

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Processor firm Intel has withdrawn its advertising from Gamasutra in response to the site's decision to carry feminist articles. The articles had drawn the ire of the self-described "Gater" movement, a grass-roots campaign to discredit prominent female games journalists. Intel was apparently so inundated with criticism for sponsoring the Gamasutra site that it had no choice but to withdraw support. An Intel spokesperson explained that "We take feedback from our customers very seriously especially as it relates to contextually relevant content and placements" and as such Gamasutra was no longer an appropriate venue for their products."

+ - Hacking USB firmware

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Now the NSA isn't the only one who can hack your USB firmware:

In a talk at the Derbycon hacker conference in Louisville, Kentucky last week, researchers Adam Caudill and Brandon Wilson showed that they’ve reverse engineered the same USB firmware as Nohl’s SR Labs, reproducing some of Nohl’s BadUSB tricks. And unlike Nohl, the hacker pair has also published the code for those attacks on Github, raising the stakes for USB makers to either fix the problem or leave hundreds of millions of users vulnerable.

Personally, I always thought it was insane that USB drives don't come with physical write-protect switches to keep them from being infected by malware."

Bug

Xen Cloud Fix Shows the Right Way To Patch Open-Source Flaws 54

Posted by timothy
from the steady-as-she-goes dept.
darthcamaro writes Amazon, Rackspace and IBM have all patched their public clouds over the last several days due to a vulnerability in the Xen hypervisor. According to a new report, the Xen project was first advised of the issue two weeks ago, but instead of the knee jerk type reactions we've seen with Heartbleed and now Shellshock, the Xen project privately fixed the bug and waited until all the major Xen deployments were patched before any details were released. Isn't this the way that all open-source projects should fix security issues? And if it's not, what is?
Medicine

After Dallas Ebola Diagnosis, CDC Raises Estimate of Patient's Possible Contacts 160

Posted by timothy
from the avoiding-panic-has-an-upside dept.
As reported by Bloomberg News, The Washington Post, and other outlets, the Liberian patient whose diagnosis of Ebola infection marks him as the first such case to have been first diagnosed within the United States may have had contact with more people than previously estimated, and 80 people in the Dallas area are now believed to have come into contact with him. While Bloomberg reports that this larger group of potential contacts is "being monitored for symptoms," the Washington Post's slightly later story says that, in keeping with the best current knowledge about Ebola's spread, "Dallas County Health and Human Services Director Zachary Thompson said that these [newly identified contacts] are not being watched or monitored and are not showing any symptoms of the illness. Only the immediate family members of the victim are being regularly monitored for Ebola symptoms; they've been ordered to stay at home and avoid contact with others."
United Kingdom

UK Copyright Reforms Legalize Back-Ups, Protect Parody 31

Posted by timothy
from the thank-you-sirs-may-I-copy-another? dept.
rastos1 writes A law has come into effect that permits UK citizens to make copies of CDs, MP3s, DVDs, Blu-rays and e-books. Consumers are allowed to keep the duplicates on local storage or in the cloud. While it is legal to make back-ups for personal use, it remains an offence to share the data with friends or family. Users are not allowed to make recordings of streamed music or video from Spotify and Netflix, even if they subscribe to the services. Thirteen years after iTunes launched, it is now legal to use it to rip CDs in the UK. Just as interesting are the ways that the new UK law explicitly, if imperfectly, protects parody.
Australia

How Hackers Accidentally Sold a Pre-Release XBox One To the FBI 42

Posted by timothy
from the we-call-this-the-low-priority-unit dept.
SpacemanukBEJY.53u (3309653) writes Earlier this week, an indictment was unsealed outlining a long list of charges against a group of men that stole intellectual property from gaming companies such as Epic Games, Valve, Activision and Microsoft. An Australian member of the group, Dylan Wheeler, describes how it was betrayed by an informant working for the FBI, which bought a hardware mockup of an Xbox One that the group built using source code stolen from Microsoft's Game Developer Network Portal. The device, which the FBI paid $5,000 for, was supposed to be sent to the Seychelles, but never arrived, which indicated the hacking collective had a mole.

+ - New OS X Backdoor Malware Roping Macs Into Botnet

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "New malware targeting Mac machines, opening backdoors on them and roping them into a botnet currently numbering around 17,000 zombies has been spotted. The malware, dubbed Mac.BackDoor.iWorm, targets computers running OS X and makes extensive use of encryption in its routines, Dr. Web researchers noted. What's even more interesting is that it gets the IP address of a valid command and control (C&C) server from a post on popular news site Reddit. The malware is capable of discovering what other software is installed on the machine, opening a port on it, and sending a query to a web server to acquire the addresses of the C&C servers."
Facebook

Facebook Apologizes To Drag Queens Over "Real Name" Rule 206

Posted by samzenpus
from the our-bad dept.
An anonymous reader writes Facebook apologized to drag queens and the LGBT community after an outcry over the social network's policy of requiring members to use real names on their accounts. While the policy itself will stay in place, Facebook says, it will be changing how the rule is enforced. In a Wednesday post, Facebook's Chief Product Officer Chris Cox apologized to "the affected community of drag queens, drag kings, transgender, and extensive community of our friends, neighbors, and members of the LGBT community for the hardship that we've put you through in dealing with your Facebook accounts over the past few weeks."

+ - Facebook Apologizes to Drag Queens Over "Real Name" Rule

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Facebook apologized to drag queens and the LGBT community after an outcry over the social network’s policy of requiring members to use real names on their accounts. While the policy itself will stay in place, Facebook says, it will be changing how the rule is enforced. In a Wednesday post, Facebook's Chief Product Officer Chris Cox apologized to "the affected community of drag queens, drag kings, transgender, and extensive community of our friends, neighbors, and members of the LGBT community for the hardship that we've put you through in dealing with your Facebook accounts over the past few weeks.""

+ - How hackers accidentally sold a pre-release XBox One to the FBI->

Submitted by SpacemanukBEJY.53u
SpacemanukBEJY.53u (3309653) writes "Earlier this week, an indictment was unsealed outlining a long list of charges against a group of men that stole intellectual property from gaming companies such as Epic Games, Valve, Activision and Microsoft. An Australian member of the group, Dylan Wheeler, describes how it was betrayed by an informant working for the FBI, which bought a hardware mockup of an Xbox One that the group built using source code stolen from Microsoft's Game Developer Network Portal. The device, which the FBI paid $5,000 for, was supposed to be sent to the Seychelles, but never arrived, which indicated the hacking collective had a mole."
Link to Original Source

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