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sm62704's Journal: Thiotimoline and space exploration 3

Journal by sm62704

Nasa has created the first antigravity machine capable of travel not only to the furthest planets, but to the stars themselves!

"This will revolutionize not only space travel, but travel on earth as well" a NASA spokesman said.

The new fuel is Thiotimoline, first theorised by biochemist Isaac Asimov in a 1948 paper titled The Endochronic Properties of Resublimated Thiotimoline.

According to the late biochemist's paper, thiotimoline is notable for the fact that when it is mixed with water, the chemical actually begins to break down before it contacts the water. This is explained by the fact that in the thiotimoline molecule, there is at least one carbon atom such that, while two of the carbon's four chemical bonds lie in normal space and time, one of the bonds projects into the future and another into the past. Thiotimoline is derived from the bark of the shrub Rosacea Karlsbadensis rufo, and the thiotimoline molecule includes at least fourteen hydroxy groups, two amino groups, and one sulfonic acid group, and possibly one nitro compound group as well. The nature of the hydrocarbon nucleus is unknown, although it seems in part to be an aromatic hydrocarbon.

Asimov's second thiotimoline paper The Micropsychiatric Applications of Thiotimoline was the one that got Dr. Richard Gotweil of the Jet propulsion Labratore to think about string theory in relation to propulsion systems, and asked noted chemist Dr. hugh Isanerd and psysicist Stephen Hawking to help. Issit and Hawking are mentioned as co-authors of his seminal paper.

The reach into the time axis of the spacetime continuum is the exciting part of this research, as it allows one to apparently break the lightspeed barrier. Of course, the barrier isn't broken, it is only severely bent.

Wikipedia already has an article on the new propulsion system, as well as Thiotimoline itself.

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Thiotimoline and space exploration

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