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Comment: Re:RAID? (Score 1) 20

by drinkypoo (#46778581) Attached to: SSD-HDD Price Gap Won't Go Away Anytime Soon

No RAID does not allow HDD to perform as SSDs. RAID increases throughput but it does not decrease access time, which in many cases is fare more important than throughput.

RAID doesn't improve first access time, but good RAID improves non-sequential seek times.

Having a seek time of 8ms when you are working with many small files is a huge hit on performance. The seek time of SSDs is well under a millisecond.

Yes, for some workloads it is very important. But for many of those, there's prefetching.

Comment: Re:McArdle is astute (Score 1) 3

by mcgrew (#46778449) Attached to: Obamacare is Not a Single-Payer Conspiracy [Bloomberg]

However, if there is anything in which I have confidence, it is this administration's commitment to slow, methodical, blame-laden screwings of the lower- and middle-class.

In what way has the lower and middle class been screwed by the present administration? I'll agree that the previous administration was great for the rich and crappy for everyone else, but I posit it's slowly improving.

The lower and middle classes have been getting royally screwed for at least half my life, and I retired earlier this year. The screwings started with Reagan's Capital Gains cuts, which caused an orgy of hostile corporate takeovers leading to layoffs and lowered hours. I was hurt badly when my employer staved off an attempted corporate pirate raid.

No, that suppository arrives with the Clinton Administration. I reckon she's wreckin'.

I certainly hope so, it would be nice for the US to raise to the level of the rest of the industrialized world from our historically barbaric health care "system". American health care is far from #1 in any measure except cost; ours is the most expensive. It's neither logical nor rational.

As to Clinton, if she's elected and half as good as her husband the country will be in fine shape. It would be incredibly hard for her to be anywhere as bad as George Junior, the worst President in my lifetime (AFAIC we've really only had two good Presidents in my lifetime, Eisenhower and Clinton, and as I was very young I could be wrong about Eisenhower but love that interstate highway system, as well as his cautions about a military industrial complex).

I'm more worried about Illinois. Dillard was Chief of Staff under Thompson and Edgar, and Illinois did pretty good until Ryan got in, and it deteriorated worse under Blago. It hasn't gotten much better under Quinn, but unfortunately Dillard lost the primary and the stupid Republicans nominated the only one of the four candidates that would get me to vote for Quinn.

Comment: Well said. (Score 1) 1

by mcgrew (#46778141) Attached to: Lies, damned lies, and ... oh no, you're going there.

Liars always lie. I think people mistrust statistics because they don't understand statistics, or worse, understand a little, just enough to be dangerous.

I worked with data and statisticians my whole career. I'm not a statistician, but learned a lot about the discipline from working with them. One of my co-workers had written a textbook on the subject that was used in colleges. Very interesting discipline.

Comment: Re:Helping the poor (Score 2) 221

How does the second part of that sentence not make you reconsider your assertion in the first?

I think you are right that might possibly be a very small fraction who actually do prefer the "vagabond" lifestyle, despite the obvious and many hardships. But to make a blanket statement that *all* homeless are in that situation as a matter of choice seems wildly inaccurate to me.

When I was young before the welfare state was dismantled and anyone in need had to be homed by law I remember seeing a couple of homeless. They lived outside in makeshift tents in the woods on the edge of town. I remember they seemed happy. Now I see hundreds of homeless people, mainly in cities and looking unhappy. I would guess based on this that maybe 1% choose to live homeless, and much fewer than this do in cities

Comment: Sounds like you work for the federal government (Score 1, Funny) 160

by MikeRT (#46777659) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: System Administrator Vs Change Advisory Board

Do exactly what they say to the letter. After the second "patch Tues" where they pound the ever lovin fuck out of Windows Server with updates and the CAB has a pile of paperwork big enough to roast a wild boar they'll suddenly regain a measure of common sense.

Comment: Re:Define homeless.... (Score 1) 221

The hustling scammers, the druggies and drunks, the mentially ill, or the real homeless that are down on their luck and actually trying?

All of those people are down on their luck, even the scammers. They were emotionally and/or socially undernourished, and they can't see any better way to live than a lifestyle which will lead to a sad and pathetic retirement, if any. The druggies and drunks are addicts, they're caught in the grip of something they can't get away from. It's not enviable.

Those people are helped by my donations to homeless shelters and to women and children shelters.

I hope your local shelters are actually good places. Often they are staffed with serious assholes. You wouldn't think that was possible. It is.

Comment: Re:Wrong, it's not the tech (Score 1) 221

For thousands of years, people have been getting mad at the beggars instead of those who profit from and thus are motivated to maintain the status quo that creates them, and indeed, depends on economic conditions which produce them. After thousands of years of this and nothing working, those who learn the lessons of history are doomed to stand around and watch everyone else repeat it.

Comment: Re:perception (Score 2) 221

The goal of Deinstitutionalization was that instead of being warehoused in huge, remote institutions, mental patients should be returned to communities where, with help, they might achieve some function in society. Unfortunately there was not much funding for the second part

Unfunded mandates are never benevolent. If the idea is that people will get help, but no mechanism for that is in the act, then that idea was constructed to fool fools.

Comment: Re:Uproar? (Score 1) 76

by drinkypoo (#46777591) Attached to: Vintage 1960s Era Film Shows IRS Defending Its Use of Computers

The old appeal to authority works every time. If your doctor is fifteen minutes late for your appointment, suck it up, buttercup. But if you're fifteen minutes late, they just might charge you for the visit and tell you to go home because the doc is seeing another patient right now. Or just banging an assistant. And if you overpay, the IRS might well keep it, but if you underpay your ass is theirs.

Or, you know, if they decide at any time that you might have underpaid once.

Comment: McArdle is astute (Score 1) 3

by smitty_one_each (#46777299) Attached to: Obamacare is Not a Single-Payer Conspiracy [Bloomberg]
McArdle is astute, combining some actual knowledge of economics (in contrast to Krugman).
However, if there is anything in which I have confidence, it is this administration's commitment to slow, methodical, blame-laden screwings of the lower- and middle-class.

But we're not getting the National Health Service anytime soon.

No, that suppository arrives with the Clinton Administration. I reckon she's wreckin'.

Comment: Re:Sorry (Score 1) 12

This is where I'm going with the argument. It's one thing to say "we cannot take any direct action now". It's quite another to lay zero foundation for any future action. As an example, we have NATO allies in the Baltics. Have we signaled anything to them other than "You are effed"?
Let's see: we've had some Navy presence in the Black Sea. I guess that's not fully nothing.

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