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Science

Colossal Squid Landed Intact In Antarctica 85 85

zakkie writes "New Zealand fisherman have caught a massive 450-kg colossal squid in Antarctic waters. This is by far the biggest yet found, measuring over 10 meters in length and weighing 450 kg. It has been taken back to New Zealand for study." The NZ government's announcement page features a downloadable backgrounder on the colossal squid (Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni) and a 1.1-MB popup portrait of the animal in the fishing boat's hold.
Security

Submission + - Email Security (gmail, yahoo etc...)

utefan001 writes: Many of us have email accounts that contain some level of sensitive data. A simple security measure that gmail could provide (but doesn't) is a log file of the date and time of the previous successful logins. Why doesn't any of the big online email providers have something like this? Some type of two-factor login would be good, but RSA type solutions still can fail using man in the middle attacks.
http://scmagazine.com/us/news/article/629853/messa gelabs-phishing-emails-outnumber-virus-trojan-emai l-attacks
Google

Submission + - Google Apps Premier Edition Aims At The Enterprise

twofish writes: "According to eWeek Google is adding Docs & Spreadsheets to its Google Apps Premier Edition and offering a pay per seat bundle to corporate customers at $50 a seat per year. For the $50 PE fee, you also get 10GB of storage compared to the free version's 2GB. The Paid for version also gives you access to APIs to hook the suite into existing corporate systems, so admins can still control provisioning, data migration, single sign-on etc. 24x7 support is also included, including phone support for administrators, and a 99.9 per cent uptime promise. Unlike Microsoft, Google seems to have a working currency converter, with UK clients being charged £26 a seat. Early adopters include GE and Proctor and Gamble, which are running beta programs on "point projects" in the US."
Programming

Submission + - Nifty shell tricks for new UNIX users

BlueVoodoo writes: "The objective of this tutorial is to show new users how to use and implement many of the shell's methods for providing automation at various levels. It demonstrates these methods by giving tricks and tips for special situations, and it also presents a rundown of useful shell one-liners for common tasks."
Announcements

Fran Allen Wins Turing Award 79 79

shoemortgage writes "The Association for Computing Machinery has named Frances E. Allen the recipient of the 2006 A.M. Turing Award for contributions that fundamentally improved the performance of computer programs in solving problems, and accelerated the use of high performance computing. Allen,74, is the first woman to receive the Turing Award in the 41 years of its history. She retired from IBM in 2002."
Software

Submission + - Turing award announced

wannabgeek writes: Turing award for the year 2006 is awarded to Frances Allen, an IBM Fellow Emeritus, for her work in compiler optimizers. From this article: she also "worked on writing intelligence analysis software for the National Security Agency. More recently she helped design software for IBM's Blue Gene supercomputer." It is the first time a woman won this honour. She was also the first woman to become IBM Fellow in 1989.
iMac

Submission + - Tons of Mac hardware updates in Q2? iMac Black?

An anonymous reader writes: "...tipsters well placed at Apple informed MacScoop that the company is preparing to make the fight harder for its competitors of the Windows world with several Mac hardware releases scheduled for calendar Q2." [...] "a black version of the iMac could make its way with the next update of the company's all-in-one consumer desktop Macs." Full article here. Just a rumor though.
United States

Submission + - Are we stuck with CYA homeland security?

netbuzz writes: "Security expert Bruce Schneier suggests this morning that "there might not be a solution" to our post-9/11 penchant for making domestic anti-terrorism decisions based on the basic human desire to cover one's backside. He might be right. But shouldn't we at least try to figure out a better way? For example, wouldn't "Commonsense Homeland Security" be a winning political banner, not a risky one? Aren't we sick and tired of taking our shoes off at the airport?

http://www.networkworld.com/community/?q=node/1174 6"
The Media

Submission + - Games as scapegoat

Megnatron writes: Penny Arcade has a letter from the stepmother of one of the kids who was recently charged with killing a homeless guy, defending the parents, and, in a refreshing twist, the games industry.
The Courts

Apple, Cisco Settle iPhone Trademark Lawsuit 111 111

A number of readers let us know that Cisco and Apple have settled the lawsuit over the use of the iPhone name for Apple's new multimedia phone. The agreement allows Apple and Cisco both to use the iPhone brand on their own products. Also, the companies said they would explore opportunities for interoperability in the areas of security, consumer and business communications. Apple still faces a suit over the name in Canada and one over its touch-screen technology in the UK.
Handhelds

Submission + - Apple, Cisco reach settlement on iPhone dispute

srussia writes: The Washington Post reports:"Apple, Cisco Settle Dispute Over Use of 'iPhone' Name". The companies said they agreed that Apple may use the name in exchange for exploring "interoperability" between the companies' products in security, consumer and business communications. No other details of the agreement were released.
Media (Apple)

Submission + - A tale of two Apples

An anonymous reader writes: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times... silicon.com is running a two-part column on the 10 best and 10 worst things about Cupertino — and it would seem Steve Jobs' latest magic trick is the ability to create products that are simultaneously Mitchell and Webb... Take the iPod — it's apparently blessed with "usability and simplicity". Yet has also "long been dogged by accusations of dodgy battery life, defective mechanics, easily scratched or cracked screens and a general lack of longevity"... Or the iPhone — a flagrant example of 'style over substance', says writer Seb Janacek, before really sticking the boot in: "A clutch of mobile devices have been offering the same services for the last year or so at a fraction of the price. And it doesn't arrive for another six months or so. And when it does there will be just one operator to choose from. The latest example of Steve Jobs snake oil?"... But wait! "The gloriously sexy iPhone was worth the wait"... gushes the same author... "Apple spent two and a half years developing a device that makes the usual phone functions, MP3 playing and internet browsing work as a whole"... Confused? It seems Steve Jobs is not the only one guilty of a 'reality distortion field'...
Graphics

Submission + - Consumers pledge to support open graphics drivers

the Hewster writes: "A pledge has been setup at pledgebank.com to let the Free Software and Open Source community show that they are ready to vote with their wallet and support graphics cards manufacturers with open graphics drivers.
To add incentive to either nVidia or ATI to open up their drivers, the pledge is to support the first of the two to open their drivers over the next 5 years. Disclaimer: I am the author of the pledge."
Patents

MS vs AT&T Case Stirs Software Patent Debate 218 218

Stormwave0 writes "A Microsoft appeal against a decision for AT&T and their speech recognition patent has reached the Supreme Court. AT&T has argued that they did not license software using the patent for sales overseas. Microsoft, in the original case, argued "that it wasn't really liable for infringing on AT&T's licensing rights because it only supplied the golden disk to the replicator one time, and that disk did not really contain software in a usable form anyway." With that argument rejected, the case has moved in an unexpected direction. The court is now debating whether or not software is actually patentable."

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