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Submission + - Russian official calls for 'international investigation' of the Apollo program (

MarkWhittington writes: According to a Tuesday article in the Moscow Times, a spokesman for Russia’s Investigative Committee named Vladimir Markin suggested that an international investigation be mounted into some of the “various murky details surrounding the U.S. moon landings between 1969 and 1972.” Markin would particularly like to know some of the missing moon rocks went to and why the original footage of the Apollo 11 moon landing was erased. Markin hastened to add that he is, of course, not suggesting that NASA faked the moon landings and just filmed the events in a studio.

Submission + - Dropbox Now Lets You Request Files From Multiple People With Just A Link

An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox today launched a very interesting feature: file requests. The new option, which essentially makes it easier to get files from multiple people, is available now to all Dropbox Basic and Pro users, with Business users getting the update “in the next few weeks.” In short, you can now ask one or more people to upload photos, documents, or any other files to a Dropbox folder you specify. All you need to do is put together the request, and Dropbox generates a link that handles the rest.

Submission + - Astronomers have discovered an exoplanet smaller than Earth

schwit1 writes: Scientists have measured the size and mass of the smallest exoplanet yet, a Mars-sized planet orbiting a star about 200 light years away.

The planet, named Kepler-138 b, is the first exoplanet smaller than the Earth to have both its mass and its size measured. It is one of three planets that orbit the star Kepler-138 and that pass in front of it on every orbit as viewed from Earth — a maneuver that astronomers call a transit. "Each time a planet transits the star, it blocks a small fraction of the star's light, allowing us to measure the size of the planet," said Dr. Daniel Jontof-Hutter, a research associate in astronomy at Penn State who led the study.

"We also measured the gravity of all three planets, using data from NASA's Kepler mission, by precisely observing the times of each transit," Jontof-Hutter said. The astronomers also were able to measure the masses of these planets. "Each planet periodically slows down and accelerates ever so slightly from the gravity of its neighboring planets. This slight change in time between transits allowed us to measure the masses of the planets," Jontof-Hutter explained. After measuring both the mass and size of an exoplanet, astronomers then can calculate its density and its bulk composition.

Submission + - ECMAScript 6 Is Officially A JavaScript Standard

rjmarvin writes: The ECMAScript 6 specification is now a standard ES6 is the first major revision to the programming language since 1999 and its hallmark features include a revamped syntax featuring classes and modules. The Ecma General Assembly officially approved http://www.ecma-international.... the specification at its June meeting in France today, ECMAScript project editor Allen Wirfs-Brock announced

Comment Re:Plex (Score 1) 122

While Plex does indeed have a paid tier, and they do charge for (some) of their apps, it's pretty much a free product. The paid tier gets you some of the newest features and access to the most recently supported platforms, but beyond that, the free product is not crippled in any way. None of that is my point.

Plex and Kodi started from the same project, and although the two products are not 1:1, they're pretty goddamn close. Plex is available in the Fire TV App Store but Kodi is not. Amazon could have believably cited the approval process to keep Kodi out of their app store (you could only sideload it as it was [and still is]) - hell, they haven't let a Plex update through since I bought the box - but they chose to go this piracy route. Pretty disingenuous, it seems to me.

Also, Plex rules. Kodi is a great product, but Plex is very full-featured, if less extensible, and is a lot easier to support.

Comment There's not an actual story here. (Score 1) 179

"Very convenient until you want to leave your iPhone and switch back to plain old text messages because suddenly you'll be unable to receive text messages from your iPhone-toting friends."

That's not how it works. And the "obscure workaround" linked is simply instructions for how to send an iMessage as a text, like in the cases where iMessage fails (poor reception).

Submission + - WWII Bugatti 100P Plane Rebuilt: Jet Fighter that Could Have Won Battle of Brita ( 2

concertina226 writes: Featuring forward pitched wings, a zero-drag cooling system and computer-directed flight control, plane was capable of reaching an air speed of 500mph, which would have made it the fastest and most advanced plane of its time.

If the Germans had been able to get hold of the Bugatti, it is believed that the plane could have outperformed the British Supermarine Spitfire planes during the Battle of Britain.

Submission + - Your Next Car's Electronics Will LIkely Be Connected by Ethernet (

Lucas123 writes: As the sophistication of automotive electronics advances, from autonomous driving capabilities to three-dimensional cameras, the industry is in need of greater bandwidth to connect devices to a car's head unit. Enter Ethernet. Industry standards groups are working to make 100Mbps and 1Gbps Ethernet de facto standards within the industry. Currently, there are as many as nine proprietary auto networking specifications, including LIN, CAN/CAN-FD, MOST and FlexRay. FlexRay, for example, has a 10Mbps transmission rate. Making Ethernet the standard in the automotive industry could also open avenues for new apps. For example, imagine a driver getting turn-by-turn navigation while a front-seat passenger streams music from the Internet, and each back-seat passenger watches streaming videos on separate displays.

Submission + - Whole Foods: America's Temple of Pseudoscience (

__roo writes: Americans get riled up about creationists and climate change deniers, but lap up the quasi-religious snake oil at Whole Foods. It’s all pseudoscience—so why are some kinds of pseudoscience more equal than others? That's the question the author of this article tackles: "From the probiotics aisle to the vaguely ridiculous Organic Integrity outreach effort ... Whole Foods has all the ingredients necessary to give Richard Dawkins nightmares." He points out his local Whole Foods' "predominantly liberal clientele that skews academic" shop at a place where a significant portion of the product being sold is based on simple pseudoscience. So, why do many of us perceive Whole Foods and the Creation Museum so differently?

Submission + - Exosuit lets divers go 1,000 feet deep (

KindMind writes: A new type of diving suit allows divers to go to 1,000 feet deep (at 30 times atmospheric pressure). A picture gallery at CNET has some neat pictures of the so-called Exosuit. According to the blog for the suit: "The first scientific exploration mission utilizing the Exosuit ADS is taking place this summer (2014), approximately 100 miles off of the Rhode Island Coast at a location called the Canyons, while working in the mesopelagic environment (depths of 200 to 1000 feet) ... The expedition's mission is to evaluate methods for improved human presence and scientific interaction at the edge of the mesopelagic realm as applied to the discovery, collection, and imaging of bioluminescent and biofluorescent organisms ..."

Submission + - Spark Advances From Apache Incubator To Top-Level Project

rjmarvin writes: The Apache Software Foundation announced the open-source cluster-computing framework for Big Data analysis has graduated from the Apache Incubator to a top-level project. A project management committee will guide the projects day-to-day operations, and Databricks cofounder and VP of Apache Spark Matei Zaharia will be appointed VP of Apache Spark.Spark runs programs 100x faster than Apache Hadoop MapReduce in memory, and it provides APIs that enable developers to rapidly develop applications in Java, Python or Scala, according to the ASF

Submission + - Open Source Brings High-End Canon Camera Dynamic Range Closer to Nikon's (

PainMeds writes: Magic Lantern is an open source "free software add-on" that "adds a host of new features to Canon EOS cameras that weren't included from the factory by Canon". One of ML's newest features is a module named Dual ISO, which takes advantage of the sensor in some of Canon's high-end cameras (such as the 5D MK II and MK III) to allow the camera to capture an image in two different ISOs, greatly expanding the dynamic range of the camera, and bringing its dynamic range closer to Nikon's popular D800 and D4.

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