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Comment: Re:And still (Score 1) 151

by TheRaven64 (#49157943) Attached to: One Astronomer's Quest To Reinstate Pluto As a Planet
If Pluto is a planet, then so is Eris (which is larger), and Earth's moon (around 5 times larger than Pluto) is possibly a binary planet. Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system, is under 3% the mass of Earth and is about ten times bigger than Pluto. There are quite a lot of moons bigger than Pluto, so would you want to classify them all as planets?

Comment: Re:White balance and contrast in camera. (Score 1) 342

by TheRaven64 (#49154111) Attached to: Is That Dress White and Gold Or Blue and Black?
Zoom right in on the bits that you think are white, so that they fill your entire monitor. They're obviously blue. For a lot of us, that's the colour that we see when we look at it in context as well. I can see how you'd interpret it as being white by overcompensating for the colour in the bottom right, but that doesn't stop you from being wrong. The gold bits are gold when you zoom in (mostly, some are black), but a shiny black often looks yellow-gold in overexposed photos.

Comment: Re:How about Lenovo go one step better? (Score 2) 205

by Junta (#49150105) Attached to: Lenovo Saying Goodbye To Bloatware

1. TPM costs money. Almost no one uses it. Therefore, it adds cost and almost no one realizes value.
2. Never used reachit, no idea.
3. A significant cost adder without much value. An eMMC might not be *too* much, but it's still significant. It'd probably be cheaper to ship with a distinct USB key, but really having the ability to put a recovery image to arbitrary USB key is more useful and less likely to become a source of servicing headache in and of itself.
4. Another cost adder that's likely to either be ineffective or a source of problems. 'Hardware' network engines are frequently problematic enough in high-end enterprise products. The absolute crap that would be a consumer grade product makes me cringe.

Comment: Re: Hard to believe (Score 1) 165

by TheRaven64 (#49148121) Attached to: Microsoft's Goals For Their New Web Rendering Engine

Who says the OS should provide nothing useful and let app makers make their money on it?

If you set up a straw man, then it's very easy to kill it. The issue is not an OS providing something, it's that Microsoft, which had a near-monopoly in the desktop space, used the money from selling the OS to fund development in another market (browsers) and then bundled their version, undercutting the competition with cross subsidies. There was a thriving browser market before IE was introduced, but it's hard to compete when most of your customers are forced to pay to fund the development of your competitor.

Comment: Re:"Free" exercise (Score 1) 276

by TheRaven64 (#49146301) Attached to: I ride a bike ...
150 km a day on a bike? How long does that take? According to my phone GPS, which isn't spectacularly accurate, I do about 18km/hour (though I'm far from the fastest cyclist), so even if you're twice as fast as me that sounds like it would involve a bit over 4 hours on a bike. That's a lot of time to spend commuting each day, it's adding over 50% to the normal work day!

Comment: Re:Kinda stupid since (Score 1) 512

by TheRaven64 (#49145303) Attached to: Machine Intelligence and Religion

Generally Fundamental Evangelical Christians teach humility and service to others and subscribe to the view that others are more important than me. That's exactly opposite to what you claim "ALL" religion is.

Really? Because that's exactly the set of values that I'd choose to indoctrinate my serfs with.

"You know that those who are recognized as rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them; and their great men exercise authority over them. But it is not this way among you, but whoever wishes to become great among you shall be your servant; "For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many."

Or, to summaries: 'Hey oppressed people, don't think about following a leader from amongst yourself, that kind of thing always ends badly'.

Comment: Re:file transfer (Score 1) 446

by TheRaven64 (#49145287) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Old PC File Transfer Problem
Laplink also had a neat mode where it would install on the remote machine for you (which was useful for me, because it came on 3.5" floppies and one machine only had a 5.25" drive). The mechanism for this was quite interesting - you ran command.com on the remote machine machine, telling it to use com1 as the console device (something I hadn't been aware DOS could do). Then it would use the type command (similar to cat on UNIX systems) to write a stream of data from the standard input to a file and finally run that file.

This obviously raises the question of why, when you have a serial console with working flow control, do you need laplink at all? If you have a null modem cable and a lot of patience, then you can always extract files by writing them to standard output and reading them off with a serial program - just make sure that you've correctly configured the UART first. If you're a bit paranoid, then running something like par2 first (I think there are DOS binaries and they're pretty small, though they may take a while on a 386) and you'll be able to recover small data errors.

Copying 160MB over a serial connection won't be fast, but I'm assuming that this isn't urgent if it's been sitting on a 160MB disk for years without backups...

Comment: Re: Hard to believe (Score 2) 165

by TheRaven64 (#49145269) Attached to: Microsoft's Goals For Their New Web Rendering Engine

IE itself can EASILY be removed from a system. Delete the EXE, done. Its been that way ALWAYS. Even during the court battles.

While this is technically true, it's also misleading. You could delete iexplore.exe, but don't expect a working system afterwards. Lots of other parts of Windows (and Office) invoked iexplore.exe directly, rather than providing a web view with MSHTML.dll or invoking the default browser via the URL opening APIs.

Comment: Re: Hard to believe (Score 1) 165

by TheRaven64 (#49145259) Attached to: Microsoft's Goals For Their New Web Rendering Engine
What is this, 1998? IE was never part of the kernel. The complaints were:
  • MSHTML.dll (around which IE was a very thin wrapper) was installed by default and used by loads of things.
  • Lots of things in Windows that should have used MSHTML.dll to embed a web view, or just invoked the default browser, used IE so that you couldn't uninstall IE without breaking Windows.
  • MS bundled IE with Windows and used their near monopoly in the desktop OS market to gain a dominant position in the browser market and push Netscape (and a few other browser makers) out of business.

It was never part of the kernel and never ran with system-level privileges.

Comment: Re:I got a goal for you (Score 1) 165

by TheRaven64 (#49145243) Attached to: Microsoft's Goals For Their New Web Rendering Engine
I've not been paying much attention to Windows for a few years, but does IE still have the same poor security reputation? I was under the impression that it did the multiprocess thing and sandboxed each instance, putting it in the same ballpark as Chrome and Safari and ahead of Firefox (which is finally going to start adding sandboxing support now). Did they manage to screw up the sandboxing and make something that's still trivially exploitable, or are you just repeating ten-year-old information?

Comment: Re: Fuck it - everyone for themselves. (Score 1) 360

by WindBourne (#49141927) Attached to: The Groups Behind Making Distributed Solar Power Harder To Adopt
The reason why America comes up with such high per capita is because we have such high GDP output, which is where our energy goes into.

The trade imbalance with China is because CHina manipulates their money illegally, along with dumps. What happens if they free their money the way that they were supposed to back in 2005? Well, it would overnight stop the imports.

Greed? You think that America is any more greedy than any other nation or their top ppl? Give me a fucking break. Our top 1% is just as greedy as your top 1%. The real difference is that our top 1% does not have regulations on them to keep the work at home. Nor do they have a gov that helps them keep it at home by manipulating money as well as massive subsidies for them to dump on other nations.

And being the largest consumer of resources? Not even close. Hell, CHina now burns 1/2 of all coal on this planet. They import and burn far more than America does.

It gets old when ppl make up BS about others with nothing to back it up.

And yeah, I think that you know that.

Comment: Re: Wrong! (Score 1) 360

by WindBourne (#49137445) Attached to: The Groups Behind Making Distributed Solar Power Harder To Adopt
The reason that america is in trouble is because of idiots like you far lefties combined with those on the far right.

Carter did not stop nukes. Secondly, it is fear from the far left that makes it expensive. And do not get me started on the fucking GOP. Those far right fascists are working hard to turn america into a China.

Counting in octal is just like counting in decimal--if you don't use your thumbs. -- Tom Lehrer

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